I am a SNCO and Former Drill Instructor

Good afternoon.  Let me get this out of the way:  I am a SNCO.  Gasp!  That may make you immediately think I am your enemy.  I am not, I assure you.  Here’s another one:  I was a DI for 3 years.  OMG, that must make me a complete asshole, right?  Nope.  I stumbled upon this website and have read a few of the articles.  While I may not agree with many of the opinions I have read about our shared organization, I do appreciate the fact that the architects of this website are trying to pass on knowledge by posting various Marine Corps orders.   Knowledge is very important and is one of the leadership traits.  Every organization (military, civilian, business, etc.) has rules and regulations that they expect their members and employees to follow.   It is important to note that in the Marine Corps, every single order and regulation is published by an officer.  Look at any MCO and you will not find a SNCO signature on it.  SNCOs do not make policy.  Our job is to enforce policy, regardless if we agree with it or not.

There are many misconceptions and a general lack of knowledge in regard to USMC orders and regulations.  This is a trend I see for every rank, not just junior Marines.  Many SNCOs and officers do not know the information or where to find it.  For example, when asked why a Marine had not received a haircut in a while, his response was that the order stated he only had to get one once a pay period.  Which order, I asked?  THE order, was his reply.  You know…..the haircut order.  I asked him to please print it off and bring it to me so that I can educate myself on the proper frequency of haircuts.  He could not find any such order. I showed him the website where to find every MCO and asked him to pass on what he learned to everyone else.  There is not just THE order, there are hundreds of them! There is nothing in MCO P1020.34G that references how often Marines should get a haircut. It simply states what the haircut regulations are.  0-3, evenly graduated.  Was this a PFC with only a few months of service?  Nope, it was a Sgt who has been in for 10 years.  Another common misconception is regarding the wear of t-shirts while in uniform.  Up until a couple years ago, I had never seen a Marine not wear a t-shirt in cammies.  I had a Marine show up without wearing one.  I told him to go put one on and he tactfully informed me that he was not required to wear one per the uniform regulations.  Yeah right, I thought.  Okay, I will play your game.  Show me.  He did!  It is there in black and white.  T-shirts are optional in uniform unless the commander specifies that you have to wear one in formation for uniformity purposes.  I am humble enough to admit when I am wrong.  I told my platoon what happened, that I was wrong and gave them the info on the wear of skivvie shirts.  Holy shit, a SNCO actually told Marines that they didn’t have to wear a skivvie shirt?  Yup.  Again, its not MY rules.  It’s the Commandant’s rules, I just enforce them.   If the CMC said that from now on, we are all going to unblouse our boots and grow beards……roger that.  Hey Devil, why aren’t your boots unbloused?  Why don’t I see hair on your face?  Again, SNCOs don’t make policy, we enforce it.  I cannot speak for every single SNCO, but I personally don’t give a flying fuck what the order says, my job is to ensure we are all in compliance.  Simple.

Long story short, it is important for all of you that are still in to understand what the regulations are.  There is a MCO governing every single thing we do.  Please educate yourselves.  Don’t listen to your buddy or your roommate because 9 times out of 10, they are wrong.  They haven’t actually seen it themselves or they heard it from someone else.  Research the orders yourself so you know what the actual info is.  If someone is telling you to do something that is contrary to an order, tactfully inform them what the proper regulations are.  That means you have to know your shit.  You can’t tell an NCO that you don’t have to field day because MCO 1234 says so.  You will look like an idiot and will have lost all credibility.  You have to actually read the shit and know the regulations.  BCP is another one.  That gets screwed up constantly.  Read the BCP order and you will know whether or not the proper procedures are being used. Do it, not because you want people to know you are right, but for the fact that you know something is being done incorrectly and you want to improve the organization.  You can complain about the Corps all day long, but if you are not doing something to improve it, then you are part of the problem.  I am passionate about Marines educating themselves and I can’t stand it when false information is being spread around.

If I hear an NCO tell a Marine that they have to do such and such because “the order” says so, I will take that NCO aside and ask them to produce the order and show that Marine where it states that. Every MCO can be found here: http://www.marines.mil/News/Publications/ELECTRONICLIBRARY.aspx

Hopefully, someone learned something by reading this.  Knowledge is power.

Thanks for reading.  Have a great day.

Semper Fi

Submitted by: Gunny

My experience so far in the USMC

When I began my four-year degree program at North Carolina State
University, I wanted something more in life than just a 9-5 job. I had this
clear vision of leaving a positive impact on the world, this grand plan that
through selfless sacrifice and pure love for my country, I could once again
restore the patriotism that has been lost and over come the anti-American
sentiment that had become so prevalent in the United States as well as the
world. I wanted my future wife and children to be proud of what I had
accomplished, not a false sense of love and lack of respect because I have a
well paying job and I can buy shiny things, so I found the United States Marine
Corps.

The day I graduated with my bachelor’s degree, the first thing I did, the
VERY FIRST THING was drive to the local Officer Selection Office in Raleigh,
North Carolina. I immediately began the paperwork process and challenged myself everyday to lower my run time and increase the maximum amount of pull-ups I was able to preform. My initial PFT score was around 250, with a
horrible run time. Within a few months, the score increased by nearly 30 points, with me doing well over 20 pull-ups; something I’ve never been able to do in my life. I was running almost every day at a local park that had great terrain for pushing my endurance to the max.

While I was enrolled in the Officer Selection Program, the Captain told
me very bluntly that I would not be able to participate in Active Duty OCS
since the USMC cancelled a few training sessions for them due to the budget
cuts. The USMC was downsizing drastically and the only thing I would be able to join (at my age 27) was the officer reserves. Although my heart was
set on active duty, I decided that my best bet was to join the ranks of the reserve
officers as he had suggested. I continued to train on my own time and worked as much as I could to save up money after college. After a year went by, the Captain told me that it would be hard to get me in the USMC at all.

I told him that this was something I really wanted, so he suggested I
talked to an enlisted recruiter. Upon his advice, I spoke with a Staff Sergeant who got me going with the enlisted paperwork. I told him that my wish was to go Intel, but he said that the job slots for that were taken, so he recommended I signed for a job that was available and he could make the switch later. I signed, like a naïve fool, believing the words of this marine; after all, marines don’t lie,
right? My ship out date was originally scheduled for December 15th
2014.

In August of 2014, my girlfriend was forced to move to Woodbridge, Virginia
by her parents. I followed her with the consent from both Captain and the Staff Sergeant. In September, my package was finally submitted to face my first officer selection board. I had high hopes because I thought I had proved my dedication to the Marine Corps by enlisting, making the package shine that much brighter. I called Captain about a week later and he said that I was not selected.

While I was upset, I still had hope: there was another selection board in
November. In the meantime though, I kept in touch with the enlisted side, asking them nearly every week if they had the Intel job for me yet.

Finally, November rolled around and I called Captain up and asked him about the board. I should have known something was wrong when he said “I haven’t heard from you in a while; you still are trying to join?” after explaining to him how much I have been training, he told me he would let me know the results of the package as soon as he hears anything at all. I never heard from him again; instead, it was the staff sergeant who informed me that I did not make the cut and I was very upset.
So, going with plan B, I asked the staff sergeant if he had secured my Intel slot. He replied “No, but I’ll make it happen before December”

About a month before I shipped out, I had already put in notice at my job, told my landlord my last day that I would be living at my residence and even sold my car to pay off the remaining debt I had on my credit card; my confidence and trust in the staff sergeant to secure my Intel slot was so strong because he was a United States Marine.  He was the symbol of honor, courage and commitment; he was a hero to me along with all the other men and women who wore the eagle, globe and anchor.

December 9th, I drove down to North Carolina to get ready to leave for boot camp. My family was so proud of me, and my girlfriend was too; she supported the hell out of me and still does to this day. I love her with all of my heart and soul.

I spoke with a new staff sergeant of Cary, North Carolina. The first thing he did was apologize to me for the previous staff sergeant who was there. I was told that he never once tried to reserve my desired Intel job, and that I never got it, but I was given a reassuring “Don’t worry, Avionics is a great job field, you’ll love it”

At this point, several red flags popped up, and I felt sick.

I thought to myself “I gave up everything based on the words of this Marine, and I was lied to. I have no job, no place to live and no vehicle aside from a motorcycle to ride in the beginning of winter near DC. What am I going to do?”

Reluctantly, I went to MEPS and prepared to ship out on Monday, the 15th. I couldn’t sleep, I couldn’t eat, I couldn’t enjoy myself…I even started smoking…something I’ve never done before in my life, but it helped a little with the massive amount of stress.

Monday eventually came, and I found myself sitting in a chair at the processing center, asking myself “What the fuck am I doing? Do I want this? Can I trust these people?!” The answer I concluded was “No, I can’t trust anything unless its documented on paper”.

I spoke with the MEPS liaison and told him if I can’t get Intel, then I will still join, but as a reservist only. After many attempts to convince me to ship out under my Avionics contract, including promises of “I’ll make a personal phone call just for you when you get to Parris Island and I’ll make sure you get Intel myself”, I turned them down and said I wouldn’t go unless they promised me in writing there that I would be given Intel. Needless to say, they wouldn’t do it, so they
called Ssgt over a speaker phone while I was sitting and waiting, “What
do you mean that stupid mother fucker won’t ship out?! That fucking piece of
shit!”

I should have known right then and there what character he was…but again, I
wanted to believe in the uniform and its meaning, so like an idiot, I chalked it up to him just overreacting out of stress, or frustration and I didn’t take his words serious. Hell, we’ve all taken things out of proportion when they don’t go the right way…so I wrote it off.

I left MEPS, contacted my former employer and landlord and they graciously
helped me out in my situation.

Before I left to go back to DC, I stopped at the enlisted office in Cary, NC to get going on my reservist contract. When I arrived, Ssgt greeted me warmly, apologizing for the problems.  When I told him I wanted the reserves, he tried to convince me to stay active duty. I told him it was either Intel or reserves, so he actively sought out an Intel contract for me while he said he was working on my reserve paperwork. I was told that I would ship out on March 3rd, 2015 for the reserves as an open contract out of NC.

When I left North Carolina, my father wouldn’t speak to me. He viewed me as
a fraud and a coward (although he has never served in any branch.

My mother and I went for a walk around the local park, and she began crying, saying that she wanted my existence to be special, and she really thought I was going to join and how proud she was of me. I told her that I still was joining but as a reservist if they could not get me an Intel contract. Seeing her cry broke my fucking heart and mentally ruined me for the next two and a half months before I joined. I felt like the piece of shit my father made me out to be, so I started drinking heavily and continued the tobacco use.

My girlfriend drove me back to Virginia, saying that she loves me no matter what path I choose in life. I knew she was disappointed as well, but I knew her love was strong enough to overcome anything as it has so far proved to be.

I left North Carolina with about 300 dollars in my bank account and lived dirt poor, not even being able to pay my landlord for the first month of me returning. Him being enlisted Army personnel understood what I went through; he is a good man.

When I arrived back in Virginia, I visited an officer selection office based on the recommendation of my girlfriend to see what exactly happened with my officer package. I’m glad she convinced me to go, because I found out, through the Officer Selection Office in Fairfax Virginia, that my Officer Package was NEVER EVEN SUBMITTED! Captain was lying to me about sending it. Why? I’m not sure. Perhaps it was because my GPA was a lousy 2.1 when I graduated, rendering it not very competitive, or because I was now living hundreds of miles away from the Raleigh Officer Selection Office. You know, I would have been upset if he said he didn’t want to submit it, but I would have gotten over it and worked with the enlisted side. Instead, I waited a year and a half for nothing. I wasted time and effort. I didn’t actively seek out a career with my degree based on believing that I would become a marine in the very near future; instead I waited tables, barely scraping by. That’s not Captain’s fault though; I should have sought out a better paying job. I was just stupid. Had the Captain told me that I was not going to be accepted, I would have done something with my life, whether enlisting or finding a private sector career, rather than playing the food industry game.

On January 12th, Ssgt contacted me saying he got me the job I wanted. I signed my job SOU and felt great. I saw what I wanted in writing and I proceeded to believe him. I told my landlord and employer once again that I had a new ship date set for February 9th.

When that weekend finally rolled around, I once again came back to NC, and my father thought I was going to back out again. I ignored him, and spent as much time with my family as I could, as well as my girlfriend. Since I didn’t have much money, I decided on selling more of my possessions. When I shipped to Parris Island, I felt scared as hell as if i made a horrible decision, as most recruits probably do.

Once on the Island, within 24 hours, I was told that I did not qualify for Intel because of past drug use, which I had waivers for. Before I left, when I first told the enlisted side I wanted Intel, I asked them many times about these waivers, ensuring they would not hinder me from getting the job I wanted. They lied and said they wouldn’t as long as I was honest, which I was. There were no moment of truth discrepancies, nor any information from them, which I tried to conceal; I was open and honest since day one.

While on the Island, I was told I was given the new MOS of Data, and that although it was a four year contract for that job and since I signed a 5 year MOS contract for a job I never received, I was obligated serve a 5 year contract. This bullshit was later reversed by a gunnery sergeant allowing me to serve a 4 year term instead.

I requested to be a reservist and explained my situation with what I had to deal
with, but he denied it saying “I’ll give you a 4 year contract, but I’m not allowing you to become a reservist.”

Since this happened, I’ve lost nearly all motivation to succeed. Who can I trust? The organization that I once thought stood for such high principles such as honor and trust has been shattered. I wake up everyday regretting my stupidity for not using my God-given logic and detecting the bullshit when it is clearing being observed by my five human senses. Now, I’m stuck. There is no reversing it, there is no way out until my time is up without potentially fucking my careers in the civilian world.

I’ve since contacted a military lawyer, seeing if there is anyway for me to become a reservist, but there seems to be no clear option for it.

While at MCT, I’ve asked my combat instructors for help, but it fell on deaf ears; they didn’t care either. Is that what the USMC is about? This once shimmering image of righteousness, tarnished by the majority of marines I’ve come into contact with makes me question the very essence of human compassion and the belief that man is born good (in the sense that a man will use his goodwill to fight off selfish temptations and self promotion when a sacrifice of innocence must be made to achieve it). Perhaps they thought what they were doing was right, that I would become a better man out of this experience (maybe I will…I’m just disillusioned and bitter now), but my better judgment tells me different. I know better now. I know that a uniform or a symbol does not make a bad person good.

So now I’m stuck in Twentynine Palms, California, training for a job I really have no desire in learning except for when I get out, there will be a well paying job in the private sector waiting for me. I’ve tried to convince myself that I want to go Officer still; but I don’t. I don’t even work out anymore like I used to. Hell, I am 5’9 and was 170lbs and 10-12% body fat before I joined and I have photos proving my fitness. Now I’m a meager 155 and struggle during every PT session. My fucking soul has been ripped apart from my body, amalgamating it into a conglomerate of 18-year-old children who have no self-discipline and are constantly ruining my freedom for me by screwing something up, resulting in mass punishment.

I’ve become an empty vessel, and no matter how much I try to pull something
up inside me, I find nothing, Void begets void.

This is my experience so far in the USMC.

Oorah.

So what would make this all better? What would turn my life around and make
living enjoyable once again? Being given what I was promised isn’t enough anymore. I don’t want Intel. I don’t want the 5-year commitment. I don’t want anything but to either be given the option of being a reservist or just getting out. That’s all I want; that’s what I feel I am entitled to based off of the lies and games I’ve had to put up with since my feet stood on top of the yellow footprints.
But hey, that’s life right? You can’t always get what you want. And as another
marine put it: “The USMC is a shit-sandwich. Yeah, they’ll dress it up for you
sometimes by throwing on lettuce, tomatoes, maybe some bacon…but you’re still
eating a shit sandwich.”

Only 3 and 1/2 more long years left.

Whoever created this site has done a wonderful thing for all of my fellow marines

who have no one to relate to or vent to. Really, thank you.

“Solamen miseris socios habuisse doloris”

Submitted by: Abdiel

Marines are like the manipulative, abusive husband we have all heard so much about.

The thought just occurred to me as I read the posts here, that the Marines are like the manipulative, abusive husband we have all heard so much about.

“You’re nothing without me. You’ll be crawling back to me in a month.”

“I don’t want to do this to you, but you are making me. This is your own fault.”

“Why do you keep making me hurt you?”

“Why do you want to leave? I give you everything! You’ll die on the street if you leave me!”

“If I wanted you to have (insert item here) I would have given it to you. You don’t need it. You only need me.”

“Stockholm Syndrome, or capture-bonding, is a psychological phenomenon in which hostages express empathy and sympathy and have positive feelings toward their captors, sometimes to the point of defending and identifying with the captors. These feelings are generally considered irrational in light of the danger or risk endured by the victims, who essentially mistake a lack of abuse from their captors for an act of kindness. The FBI’s Hostage Barricade Database System shows that roughly 8 percent of victims show evidence of Stockholm syndrome.”

I’m sure I’m not the first to notice this, in fact I’m probably not the first person on this site to put those two together. But it tells you all you need to know about careerists, doesn’t it?

Submitted by: Billiam201

Entry 1: The REAL bootcamp

To whoever runs this site: I, like many before me, was a motivated individual who wanted to join an organization that I thought held the same values as me. I wanted to something great with my life and be part of something that money could not buy. I have two college degrees (a BA and an AA) and enlisted anyway because I did not make the cut for OCS (gpa wise). After joining the USMC, I quickly found out what this government organization is all about.

I occasionally write about this in a personal document to see if my opinion will ever change, however I don’t think it will… My emotion, intellect and motivation…my very SOUL has been lost upon joining the USMC.

Here are a few of the things I’ve written since bootcamp. Hopefully it will reveal to those wishing to join what the Honor, Courage and Commitment is REALLY about.
Use it or not, edit what you like, I don’t care. It just feels good to vent to someone other than my wife, friends or family. Thank you for this site, it will help me through my few years of hell.

Cheers.

-=Entry 1: The REAL bootcamp=-

“…Everyday is a struggle to wake up…even though I’ve finally obtained a morsel of the dream that I thought I once wanted.  To serve in the United States Marine Corps has been a very difficult thing to do.

Some of you without military service probably think its nothing but grueling physical training…shooting guns, working out, strategizing how to eradicate the enemy…or let me put it in the terms how it was verbally taught to me: “The mission of the Marine Corps rifle squad is to locate, close with and destroy the enemy by fire and close combat.”
Bullshit.

The mission of the Marine Corps is to exploit, demoralize and humiliate the subordinate through drivel void of intellect, tedious labor accomplishing nothing and bumper-sticker slogans designed to create a hive mentality absent of commonsense and logic.

-That is my personal experience, not even a year in; perhaps it will change.

The most frustrating thing is dealing with enlisted superiors who lack the mental capacity to boil a fucking egg.  Many of them are selfish liars savagely bent on self-promotion through the slave-like labor of young skulls full of mush.

The sergeants and up (E5+) try to present themselves as military gods, despite their lack of combat experience or education.  Some of them treat us the way they do because they say it will toughen us up, others continue the cycle of shit because they went through it, thus finding the need to perpetuate it; that’s logical…right?

Instead of being competent, compassionate and possessing a mentor-like personality, they succumb to the ignorant ways that they were taught, be it in the Corps or during their youth.
It’s unbearable.

The officer side is much different from what I observe.  The officers (most of them, there are a few shit bags, don’t get me wrong…) have a vivid desire to mold their enlisted counterparts into being productive marines while reflecting the gentleman chivalry that the Corps supposedly prides itself on.

Officers use logic.  Officers use courtesy.  Officers can speak proper English.  The officer personality is what every enlisted marine should strive to act like.  Semper Fidelis (always faithful) should extend across the board.  The Non Commissioned Officers and Staff Non Commissioned Officers should be required to tow the line of the Marine Corps standards, yet many of them seem to fall well short of it.  Why?

And to top it off, the Enlisted ranks shit-talk the officers when they’re not around, claiming that a Marine Corps Officer is less of a Marine than they are.  Common phrases like “Don’t call me sir, I work for a living” (An enlisted Marine must refer to all officers as sir, and all superior enlisted Marines by their ranks…so to call an enlisted Marine a “sir” is highly offensive to them for some reason be it out of jealousy or unwarranted pride.)

Returning to what I initially started out with in the beginning of this entry, I’ll describe the average day for me beginning with boot camp.  This is for all of you desiring to become part of the world’s most elite fighting force.

1.) You will wake up every morning at 4am.  You will get yelled at and fucked with for about an hour while you’re cleaning the same shit you cleaned the night before you went to sleep.

2.) After being told what a piece of shit you are for that first waking hour, you will then march in formation to the dining hall (chow hall). Pray to God that its not winter when you go, because you will not be allowed to wear gloves or winter apparel despite it being 20 degrees outside…the sergeants though will, of course, be dressed for whatever weather the recruit depot throws at them.  On the march to the chow hall, you will be expected to preform drill movements (those fancy tricks you see Marines doing with their rifles on those commercials brainwashing that your purpose in life is to wear that sexy uniform).  If ONE of you fucks up a drill movement, you will be marched back to the squad bay (living quarters) and then try again.  Keep in mind; if it is winter, your hands will go numb.  Good luck preforming the proper movements…   I cannot tell you how many recruits I’ve seen contract pneumonia…

3.) Upon arriving at the chow hall, you will be treated like shit and fucked with while you eat. I’ve personally witnessed recruits being forced to walk around in circles with food in their hands while other favored recruits are allowed to indulge.  Once you’re finished eating, repeat step 2 in reverse.

4.) So now you’re back at the squad bay, can you guess what you’re doing next?  Cleaning again for another hour or so.  Yeah, the same shit you cleaned earlier, while getting fucked with and ridiculed for sneezing without permission.

5.) After the morning clean up is finished, its time to start training right? Wrong. Whatever the event of the day is, you’ll be stuck outside waiting for hours to do this one even that takes 15 minutes to accomplish.  Get used to it.  The majority of your time is spent sitting around with your dick in your hand.  Government efficiency, right?

6.) So by the time you’re done, its time to get lunch chow.  Repeat steps 2 and 3 again. Oh and pray to God that you’re not early for any meal.  You and your platoon could be the best damn recruits to ever grace the recruit depot…if the drill instructors have free time, they unleash their frustration of being in that shit-hole on you.  You’ll be doing creative things like running in whatever direction the drill instructor points or holding your rifle in one arm parallel to the deck (floor) until its time to eat.  What does this do?  I would say teach you not to fuck up, but if you aren’t fucking up and are still getting punished…why try not to fuck up if the end result is the same?  Positive reinforcement? Ha! What a crock of shit.

7.) So now that the chaos of the morning is over, and you’ve eaten lunch, depending upon what phase of training you’re in, you’ll either have classes on sexual harassment, sexual assault or hazing/fraternization.  Classes on combat support? Few and far between.  These classes suck too.  They are dry as hell and so common fucking sense that an autistic monkey could grasp the concept within the first minute of the “course”…yet you’ll be sitting there for 2-3 hours…being taught how you’re a rapist because some dumb cunt decided that she regretted spreading her legs open for you the night before.  You think that shit in college is rough?  How like one in four men will rape a girl?  Please, according to the Marine Corps, we’re all rapists that just haven’t been given the opportunity to molest the innocent yet.

8.) By now, its almost dinner chow.  Guess what we’re going to do… Yep, repeat steps 2 and 3 once more.

9.) After the last chow of the day, we’re finally back at the squad-bay which seems like heaven…in some sick way…  Get ready to clean weapons that you’ve never shot for 1-2 hours.  In addition to that, get ready to clean that same shit you cleaned earlier in the morning…again…

10.) Now its hygiene time.  You’ll get anywhere from 1 minute to 5 minutes to clean yourself up.  Shower, shave, brush your teeth, dry yourself off…everything in about 5 minutes.  You’re going to smell horrible still even after, and if you’re unlucky enough, you’ll develop some painful rashes and sores on your body in places you were not able to fully clean.

For God’s sake though, don’t go to the Corpsmen (Navy medical staff).  If you have ANY infection or tender area on your battered body, get ready to spend anywhere from an extra week to a year on the island depending upon the severity of your problem.  They don’t care about your mental state, or how it will crush your motivation to not graduate on time.  Uncle Sam wants to make sure his product, YOU, are 100% fit to do whatever bitch work he deems fit.

11.) Now, the best part of the day has arrived.  Mail time.  If you never cared about letters from relatives, you’ll be singing a different tune by this point.  Just knowing that someone gives a shit about you will help you make it through the day.  Believe me, they say that the DI’s (drill instructors) care about you deep down, but the majority of them don’t.  No, really, they don’t.  They’re just there to do their job and get the hell home.

My advice? Save EVERY letter you get. It will help greatly on days you do not receive mail.

12.) After you survived the soul-sucking day, its almost time for sleep…after you clean the same shit you did the whole day once more.  You’ll finish cleaning, and then you’ll get about 5 minutes for a group prayer.  At 8pm you’ll be in bed to go to sleep.  One thing I cannot complain about is that you really do get 8 hours of sleep, unless you’re fire watch, then you get 6-7 hours.  Take advantage of as much sleep as you can, because tomorrow is going to be the exact same thing.  THE EXACT SAME THING!

You’ll learn to daydream.  You’ll learn to stack rocks and blades of grass on top of each other to build little structures in the dirt while you await orders to do some other bullshit training exercise.  Who is qualified to be a United States Marine? Everyone. Who can make it through boot camp? Anyone. Who can become part of the few and the proud?  All of us.

Think long and hard before you join. Hell, if you’re a big moto-fuck like I was before getting in, thinking that every negative thing you read online is written by some pussy who couldn’t cut it, then go reserves.  Retain at least some of your freedom.  Just be sure its really what you want and do your homework on the job you’re signing up for…then again, that’s an issue in itself…actually getting the job…

I was promised intel. I even signed a job SOU for it and scored phenomenally well on my DLAB, only to have it taken away within less than 24 hours of bootcamp. I was then placed as an open contract.

Who am I?  An older private first class (E2) with a bachelor’s degree in Political Science and associate’s degree in Liberal Arts.  The USMC was always a dream of mine; now it’s my perpetual nightmare…”

—–And here is a message to my wife (who supported me joining) detailing my frustration with the USMC—-

“They (enlisted Marines) have an insipid intellect, and they do not care to educate themselves.  They are content with mediocrity and they always try to pass responsibility off on someone else so they are not held accountable.  They BLAST garbage pop-music in the barracks which details the extent of the brain power, and they waste their money on frivolous things such as expensive cars, basket ball shoes and flashy material possessions to give them the illusion that they are something more than they are.

I hate people like that.  I hate the need for attention and the endless thirst for popularity.  I hate the hive mind, and I hate not thinking for myself.  I’m the freak here.  I’m the outcast who is different because I don’t conform to their simple mindset, and I’m so damn proud of that.  Sometimes I wonder if I’m different because I choose to be different.  I wonder if all this mental rebellion I have is because I like being the outlier of the group.  I wonder these things, but then I always return to my conclusion that I’m not.  I’m different because I care about educating myself and acting like a gentleman.  I might not know all the bullshit jargon of the Marine Corps, but I am me.  I know what class is, and yet I’m humble. I know when to bite my tongue, and I (even though I don’t like to) know when I need to speak up.

I thought the USMC would give me some relief to the rotting American culture of materialism and popularity contests, but this is just high school all over again, and I hate it. Do you know what its like to wake up, knowing that your day is going to be filled with emptiness? Knowing that someone is going to bitch at you merely so they can seem like they have power in front of their superiors?  Knowing that the person to the left and right of you has the intelligence of a fruit fly?

If you have no idea, but would like to experience it because you’re a masochist, then please, join the USMC.  As soon as you open your eyes up in the morning (at 4am), the first thing you’ll think is “God damnit… …I’m still here…”

Submitted by: Abdiel

The “Title” “Marine” is Given, not Earned

As a teen in highschool, I didn’t know what I wanted to do when I graduated. So I decided joning the military would give me some time to decide and maybe even some money for school, or possibly even making it my career. I lived in a large military city of mostly Navy personnel so after seeing those cool marine commercials I decided to “challenge” myself and “try” to become one of the few & proud instead of just another sailor. I went to the recruiter and said I wanted to join when I graduated and the process began. I entered the dep program 5 months before my ship date. We didn’t have computers and internet at the time so it was done the old fashioned pen and paper way. I took the asvab. If I remember, I scored around 66 and the minimum is 35. I then went to the meps for the physical eval & such. It was determined that I was a good candidate since I was a normal healthy kid with just a few extra pounds. Finally after months of waiting, my ship date arrived. One last stop at the meps and it was off to basic training. When I first arrived, I fully expected the games and BS to happen. As I progressed through the different phases I came to realize that the “few” and the “proud” was just hype. I noticed many recruits who just couldn’t make the grade. Dropping out of runs, failing knowledge tests, unking on the range, etc but they were always given multiple chances to redo them. Several tried to quit but they were told they had to honor their contract & that was what really made me think. Anyone with half a brain, and a few minimum requirements could be given the title.
From the corpse FB page:
Anonymous asked, “How do you prepare for boot camp?”
To be a Marine is to become an elite and strategic warrior.
An “elite” and “strategic” warrior? Hmm. Let me see…..what does it take to “earn” the title and become one if the “elite.”
18 years of age
Legal US citizen
High school diploma
Minimum asvab score of 35
Reasonably good health
Sign the dotted line and swear an oath
3 pull ups
50 crunches in 2 minutes
Run 3 miles in 28:00 or less
Hit the target 75% of the time
Tolerate the bullshit for 90 short days and presto, The title of marine is given to you. (I kind of took Ninjas words where he said the title is really given & not earned)
If you fail any of these at boot camp you are given multiple chances to try again. Why would an “elite” force want that? Maybe its all just marketing BS to lure unsuspecting kids to something where they really just need warm bodies to perform grunt work. I fell for the hype. Recruiters don’t necessarily lie, but they’re not exactly Paul Harvey who will tell you “the REST of the story.” So there. The title is given. Its harder to quit than graduate. For those motards that call people pussies, non-hackers, wimps, quitters etc, maybe so but they quit and or got out because it was nothing like what they were told by their recruiters and other marines. I’ve also asked this question a few times. If the corpse is so great, then why do so few stay in and become lifers? My platoon graduated 63 and to my knowledge, only 3 served for 20. A few reenlisted once but the vast majority served their 4 and got out. Most of the ones I keep in contact with have very successful lives and families yet we were told we wouldn’t amount to anything by the corpse. I challenge anyone to prove me wrong that the title is given.
Submitted by: MasterLcpl

Why I decided to get out

In case some lifer thinks I’m a cry baby, I was SGT. in for 9 years with the intention of of staying for 20. Even after I saw through the bullshit I wanted to stay. I was in a Bulk Fuel company, most of our equipment was warehoused. The only orders I ever got was keep the troops busy. They were sweeping the parking lot twice a day, wiping imaginary dirt off equipment and straighten the hose rack twice a week. Winter and summer I had to keep them   outside while SNCOs stay inside. In one of the coldest winter North Carolina had, my platoon was outside stringing camouflage nets for summer So much for the Marine Corps taking care of their own. I foolishly thought taking care of the troops was part my job.

My C.O. wouldn’t recommend me for D.I. school, he said I would make a better instructor for reserves. The Parris Island board disqualify me for 2 office hours I had 6 years before for drinking. I got orders for Parris Island after three weeks in D.I. school I,m out for psychological reason. That was all over the company before I got back, and I thought my SRB. was confidential. I wasn’t the first person in the company that was put out of D.I. school. I wasn’t the first person  that year, but I had committed a sin.

There were a set a brothers in the platoon, they both stupid and assholes. They enlisted on the jail or Marine Corps choice. I asked why can’t they just be put out. They would have danced to the back gate for a U.D.  No we couldn’t do that it would make the company look bad. They went U.A. and while they were drunk and high. They ran their car into a tree both of them were dead. A Staff Sgt stood in front of the platoon he said he was glad they were dead and if he had been there, he would made sure they were dead. He was writing their parents to tell what assholes and shit birds  they were and make sure they wouldn’t get the insurance money. No officer or StaffNCO. called him on what he said. I followed him to the platoon office, I ask why would he want to torture the family like that. He said why do you care. I said they were in my platoon I’m suppose to care.

A few months later a kid came to me asked for a 96 so he could go home for sister’s wedding. He had used up all his leave time. I went to the platoon SGT. I explained the problem. His answer was Fuck him tell to go U.A. I blew up okay I tell one of the best men in platoon to go U.A. and when he’s standing in front of the C.O. I’ll be standing with him I’ll say you told him to go U.A. I went to the Lt. got the 96 and got screamed at for jumping chain command.

After that I decided it wasn’t worth it to stay in.

Submitted by: Fairhaired Kidd

Corporal Punishment

The only people who think the Marine Corps sexual assault programs work are people who have never been sexually assaulted in the Marine Corps.

Before I begin I would like to add that this blog will also touch on the subject of how commands deal with suicidal ideations and depression as one lead to the other in my case as well as many others. I am three weeks from going on terminal leave, and couldn’t be happier and this is a huge part as to why. I never submitted a re-enlistment package and I actually tried to VERP, but my MOS couldn’t at the time.

It started after boot camp. I went on boot leave and was raped by a former mentor of mine from my old rescue squad. I was truly devastated the Marine Corps made me feel like I was as tough as they come after boot camp, but that night did away with that mentality. I withdrew from people and tried to deal with it on my own. The result was I got bullied and made fun of a lot by my Marine peers. I do not hold a grudge over this anymore however, because I realized an inevitable problem in the USMC which is age. 18 year old kids fresh out of high school don’t know how to deal with real adult issues and its not their fault and no class is going to teach someone empathy, understanding, or compassion like experience would. two years later I finally decide to talk to someone, of course I cant talk to a friend or other Marine, because then it would be an open case. This is a huge flaw in the system as well. what happens is if you begin to talk about anything possibly deep the Marines literally would take their fingers plug their ears and say lalalala. They don’t want to be in trouble if they don’t report it, but also don’t want to deal with it or be a part of it either. The only people I cold see was the chaplain and UVA. The UVA gave me a military one source card. By the way military one source does not cover sexual assault specifically, the only thing it is good for is to talk to a stranger over the phone about your problems, because your command and friends can’t. So after that I went to the chaplain, which I didn’t want to because he tries to shove Jesus down your throat and repeats himself over and over, because he is a Korean guy who barely speaks English. Meanwhile in the 1st Sgt’s office my platoon sgt who never asked even how I was doing before is being ripped a new one, because a Marine of his is talking to the chaplain and he don’t know why. Later that day I am held well past working hours until I tell him why I went to see the chaplain. I can’t tell him, because the circumstances but he doesn’t care he just wants to cover his ass. after about three or four hours of what felt like interrogation I tell him. The next day I am called into 1st sgt’s office with the UVA present explaining that it is now an open case, because someone reported it, Caugh gunny fuckface because no one else knew. I was immediately alienated and told that I needed to heal. That I was broke and needed to recover. They moved me out of my PTP cycle to a holding platoon where I mowed lawns and other odd jobs. When we did unit PT I wasn’t allowed to participate just watch. When we went on hikes I was given a blue rubber rifle instead of a real one. I became so depressed I started contemplating suicide. I was denied the opportunity to see a real therapist. I saw one on base but he wasn’t licensed and was some old guy prob vet at the family recourse center who basically would relate every issue I brought up to how much a Marine I was and stupid shooting references etc. I requested mass and the Battalion CO saw to it that I got counciling off base. I then tuned out all the Marines around me focused on my workouts at the time boxing was my outlet and my therapy. After a year and being ripped to shreds cus I worked out so much from anger the 1st Sgt told me I was now fixed. I then got to go on a deployment however immediately following the deployment my security clearance gets revoked from me being suicidal before. Even though I did everything I was supposed to and sought help on my own. I didn’t ask for attention, in fact almost no one knew. I didn’t want to stop PT, in fact I worked out about 4 hours a day. I just wanted to be a Marine. The paperwork took a while so that explained the delay affect. to sum it up they took my clearance away with so little time left there really isn’t anything I could do about it. I never had a NJP, only 1 page 11 for not doing homework once, and 1 speeding ticket. I have done nothing wrong the only thing I did was ask for help when I needed it. I now have three weeks left and I cant wait to be done. I have made peace with what happened to me, but the way I was treated like a criminal for being a rape victim still to this day haunts me. I don’t know how many others can relate but this is my story, and is a large part of the reason I too hate the USMC.

Submitted by: Corporal Punishment

Rants of a Boot Marine Part V: Still Slowly Dying

Today was supposed to be the start of a great weekend. I had it all planned out: a camping trip with the Church youth group I volunteer with on the weekends, not having to deal with morning colors or any of the mediocrity of base life as a single Marine.

But it all came crashing down when a Sergeant from my work section comes back, telling me I failed field day. I was dumbfounded, I was pissed, I wanted to punch the wall. This didn’t sense at all as I had made sure EVERYTHING was wiped down. In the paradise air station located in San Diego, field day inspections involved NCO’s and the duties walking into random barracks rooms while everyone is at work, making sure that the room is organized, and that it didn’t smell bad.

Some people straight up suck at cleaning even with this rather lax policy, but my Sgt, being from the groundside, said that dust was all over the place. This was after my Corporal had already done a pre field day inspection, saying that I was good to go.

To make it worst, I asked if I could just do a re-inspection at the end of the work day just so that I could continue with the camping trip. They didn’t take it into consideration, telling me to clean again, prepare to report to the duty in my Chucks, and that I better suck it the hell up because I was also about to not get a decent amount of time for chow anytime soon.

I sit here after wiping down everything again, wondering why it’s completely unfair. Yeah, I sound like I’m whining, but I like to voice out the fact that this is utter BS.

Even my Cpl thought that this was BS, but because it would make it unfair for other members in the unit that failed too, I couldn’t make that camping trip. Talk about going UA but it’s not worth it for something that I volunteer for.

If they ever told me, do your four and get out, thinking that I would feel bad or whatever, fine, I’m actually happy. Because I plan to freaking VEERP a year earlier that my original EAS.

I don’t care if I have been on a deployment, you end up in a place the United States has no business in to begin with, you work crappy hours, and things like family fall apart at home. Sure you can get more money, but is it worth six months to a year of your time doing something you don’t like?

Call it not embracing the suck, but people have to realize that the stack of ribbons that you wear on your uniform don’t mean anything once you get out, but only a memorabilia of what you done. Some people deploy not for a patriotic sense, but because they want to increase their ribbon count, “slay bodies”, and have bragging rights of how they went to “Hajiland”, traveling all over the place.

To make it worse for those motivators out there, I don’t even care about being promoted. Those who think that rank means everything, don’t realize that experience trumps everything including rank. To show some examples, I’ve seen a Marine with a Tan Belt beat the crap out of a Marine with a Green Belt in MCMAP, a Captain falling out of a ruck run while a PFC was leading it at Basic Reconnaissance Course, and my own Sgt (the same one that failed me at Field Day today) getting a slow ass PFT run time, while ranting about how I should do more pull ups.

In the past recent months, I’ve experienced more stupidity, double standards, and the suicide of my friend and fellow unit member, which was viewed by almost a majority of the squadron, with little to no connection.

In the inside, I feel like I’m slowly wasting away, wondering why I am stuck now at a dead end admin job, waiting for the day where I am eligible to put in that VEERP package.

Submitted by: Anonymous 

Escape from Okitraz, Part 3

When I was sentenced to The Rock the “Liberty Card” policy had yet to be invented. As a result, my colleagues and I didn’t have to worry about making it back to our cells before bed-check.

After a few months of muttering about the bullshit, all the while becoming increasingly miserable, I decided that it was time to fight back. Being a firm believer in the fact that a person should know the regulations he was going to be governed by, I had read all sorts of MCOs, as well as DOD, USFJ, MARFORPAC, and innumerable other orders and regulations. Most of them were loosely interpreted stateside, but rigorously enforced on The Rock. I decided that the best part of the dagger in my back was that it cut in both directions.

A few marines, tired of 2 $10 haircuts a week on a $240 paycheck, started shaving their heads. The SNCOs immediately started reprimanding and counseling these marines, because their haircuts were “eccentric”. The next week, several of them showed up, still bald. When a particular MGySgt dragged them to his office to write them up on charges (he wasn’t recommending Ninja Punches, either. He was going to court-martial these men) one of them proceeded to reach in to his pocket and produce the page of the order that stated “While male marines are not required to clip their hair to the scalp except while undergoing recruit training, this order does not prevent any male marine from clipping his hair to the scalp should he so desire.” Left staring impotently into the face of 4 marines who all-of-a-sudden knew the rules, he made them sweep the entire complex before sending them home without supper.

All of a sudden, environmental was aware that the HVAC shop in avionics was performing unlicensed automotive air conditioning service, as well as repairing the air conditioner in the managers’ office at the USO on Futenma (it happened the Avionics Officer’s wife worked there) in direct violation of environmental regulations and MCOs against enlisted “personal servitude”.

The three marines in the squadron who the command had decided were “crazy” went to their various mental appointments at Lester and quietly let slip that they had no idea why they were there, that their appointments had been made for them, and their gunny had told them to be there.

The squadron had a “Restriction room” where they locked up marines on restriction after an NJP. I mean they literally locked them inside this room. They let them out for 5 minutes, once an hour, if they wanted to smoke and use the restroom. (This may be overinflated, I never spent any time in it, and marines have been known to embellish).

Once it became known to the Office of the Judge Advocate General that a squadron commander was imprisoning marines in a locked room (not only illegal, but dangerous as the marines only egress in the event of a fire was a 3rd floor window) they at least had to stop locking the door and let them use the bathroom when they needed to.

We all know that the duty driver is supposed to be rested, and we all know that SNCOs don’t care. They will continue to fuck with that driver as much as they want (even more so if he/she asserts that they need sleep so they can drive in the morning. There is nobody in the entire maween corps who cares about this.

On the other hand, a handful of Japanese citizens found out that the Americans were making marines drive these enormous vehicles on their public streets without any sleep. I hadn’t quite planned on politicians getting involved, but it was amusing nonetheless.

At first, the officers had no idea how all this information was reaching the marines. A handful of printed pages, distributed to the right people in the right bars can make a hell of a difference, once you know who to hand them to.

Needless to say, once some people ran their mouths, they weren’t very happy with me once they found out. The threats and under-the-table torments began to leach from the offices on the flight line. The officers and senior enlisted didn’t like being hit over the head with their own rule books, especially by a “shitbag Lance Corporal”. Those rules were not meant to be applied to officers, and those that were, they said, had to be flexible enough to “allow officers to properly manage their men”

They demanded to know why I felt that I felt I “got to do what the hell I wanted” and “didn’t have to follow the same rules as other marines”. I told them that I did have to follow the same rules as other marines, but the regulations were very clear that this included them as well. According the the Commandant, as well as other generals and the Chief of Naval Aviation, these were the rules. I didn’t write them and, as marines and men of integrity, they should be enforcing them with equal vigor.

Needless to say, this was not what they wanted to hear.

Submitted by: Billiam201

Peanut Butter Platoon

Back in the day when I was with my good old unit we had this asshole Corporal that everyone hated. I’m not gonna us any real names to lets call him Corporal Fuckface, anyway Corporal Fuckface had this habit of going through peoples rooms and eating food while they were gone. He was able to do so because he was the BEQ manager and had a master key. It pissed everybody off but no one could say anything. One day me and my roommate came up with the idea to fuck with the food.

Being the nasty little fucking marines that we were, we came up with the brilliant idea of having the entire platoon bust a load in a jar of peanut butter, (which was his favorite). Of course we had to put our high school educated minds to work and figure out how to convince everyone to do this with out some overly motivated boot ratting on us trying to look good for promotion. We also had the task of finding a jar of peanut butter big enough that could hide 30 loads of jizz, thanks Costco.

Surprisingly it wasn’t difficult to convince everyone to participate , and after a couple days we had 28 generous donors. We mixed it up to the point where you couldn’t tell, and put it in the fridge. The next days we went to work to do more mindless shit as usual, and waited to see him at formation. When our dear Corporal Fuckface finally showed up I was ready for him to kill me and the roommate, as I was positive he noticed the taste of jizz from his weekends clubbing in Hollywood, but he stood there talking as usual, the following week went on to be some of my fondest memories from the Corps.

Every time he would fuck with us, every time he would break shit in our rooms during field day, ever time he would yell at us in front of the officers trying to look good, our faces hurt from holding in the laughter knowing that he had a mouthful of 1st platoons jizz . He finished the entire jar in a week, still left it empty in the fridge when he was done…. asshole. Moral of the story, dont’ t eat peoples fucking peanut butter. THE END

Submitted by: Mark

How to Determine if you are Fit for the Marine Corps

Step one:
Purchase a 12oz. ball-peen hammer, and label it “jarhead calibration device”.

Step two:
Hit yourself in the head with three times with the hammer.

Step three:
Ask yourself if you still want back in.

If yes, repeat step two.

If no, place hammer in a drawer, and wait until you feel the urge to go back in, then repeat this procedure. When 30 days have passed between treatments, you may consider yourself cured.

If you still determine that more treatments are needed, the size of the hammer may be increased, or the number of strikes with each treatment, but I recommend against doing both except in extreme cases.

If you frequent iHateTheUSMC.com you obviously don’t understand the Marine Corps.

Your comment isn’t going to be deleted because it’s not spam and doesn’t violate opsec. We aren’t in the habit of deleting comments offhand. I have to say though that your assertion that we don’t have an understanding of the Marine Corps is a bit strange, as most of us went through at least one enlistment. I do however agree wholeheartedly that “there is a reason for everything you NCO’s and CO’s do”, what matters then is what those reasons are.

For example, there are “reasons” for why enlisted Marines in Oki are treated like naughty twelve year olds, those reasons just aren’t very good ones. Following the 1995 rape of a 12 year old native girl by a Navy Corpsman and two pathetic Marine hangers-on who later cried racism in their treatment in an Okinawan prison, liberty restrictions began to be put in place.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1995_Okinawa_rape_incident

Now, the fact that these restrictions really only applied to “junior” enlisted Marines on island could be argued for at this point, the major incident sparking these restrictions was perpetrated by their demographic. Following this, the restriction remained in place and only became a bit worse until 2002, when Marine Major Michael Brown assaulted a bartender:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Brown_Okinawa_assault_incident

With this, those damn “junior” enlisted Marines really started to feel the restrictions. But wait, it was a Major that did it this time, shouldn’t the restrictions now extend and rigorously apply to field grade Marine Officers? Why are the lower enlisted ranks being punished for a crime that wasn’t even perpetrated within their demographic? Well, there’s a reason for this, and it can be summarized in one word: careerism.

When someone fucks up, they’re done, and so is their leadership. As one officer said to me, “when a dog shits on your carpet, do you blame the dog, or his master, the one who trained him?” These incidences add fuel to the fires of the protests against our continued presence on island by the natives; potentially weakening our presence in a strategically critical location. So, when word of these incidences hits the higher levels of command, they demand to know what’s being done about it, and more importantly, who’s to blame for it. When you take command of a unit and have the choice of either trusting your men, which runs the risk of damaging your career, or playing it safe and cracking down on those who can’t do anything about it, the choice is often depressingly clear. The morale and well being of your men come second to the security of your career, oh, I mean of the local populace after all, who could argue with that?

It’s awfully difficult to quantify how well you did at your last unit on your next performance review by citing the number of good Marines you got to re-enlist because you treated them like men. It’s so much easier to cite the lack of incidences under your firm “leadership”. You can’t just go around punishing all field grade Officers though, so what to do? Why, crack down on the Enlisted scum of course! They’re all lazy assed criminals anyway, that’s why they get a medal if they don’t get caught for three years. If they wanted to be treated like people they should have commissioned. It’ll add an extra incentive to get to that next rank, and it’ll be doubly hilarious when they get to that next rank and the restrictions are suddenly and unexpectedly advanced to include their new rank as well.

As to the “10% who will not be happy and who have bad experiences” assertion, let’s check out the average reenlistment rate for the Marine Corps:

https://www.hsdl.org/?view&did=716162

Wow, a whopping 35% average reenlistment rate for first timers. And before you spout off the ever available catch-all “the USMC is not for everyone”, oh, too late…Let’s look at the passing rate of USMC boot camp in 1998 and 2006; prior to the flooding of the Marine Corps with 25,000 new members over the course of 3 years with the Grow the Force Initiative beginning in 2007:

http://usmilitary.about.com/od/joiningthemilitary/l/blbasicattrit.htm

What a truly elite organization, with a grueling 88.3% graduation rate, which is higher than either the Navy or Army. How do they manage to keep their standards so incredibly high? Hell, the University of Phoenix online has a lower graduation rate than that. The few the proud? There are currently about 182,000 active duty Marines, the only reason there aren’t more is because the Marine Corps can’t afford them. Without the Marine Corps the US would be a very different place? It sure would! It would be a place with only one Army, two Air Forces, and about $22.7 billion to spend elsewhere. Christ man, I’m begging you, bring up an actual argument that we haven’t heard before and can’t be summarily disproved with a cursory Google search. Or, at the very least, don’t just automatically assume that we’re all shit bags who are crying about our wittle feewings getting hurt by the big bad NCOs. Try actually backing up your claims with a little thing called any fucking evidence at all.

Submitted by: freeatlastfreeatlast in response to:

“It saddens me to see some of you who do not have an understanding of the Marine Corps. The USMC is the best thing that has happened to me. But there is always that 10% who will not be happy and who have bad experiences. It is what you make of it. And there is a reason for everything you NCO’s and CO’s do, again most of the time. The Corps is the most feared military organization in the world and there is only way to make Marines, who can carry on that legacy. If it weren’t for the Corps then the US would be a very different place. I’m a third generation Marine and have my family who are Marines have said they would never of changed anything. The brother hood is undesirable. It’s something you have to experience your self. Now don’t get me wrong the USMC is not for everyone. There is a reason we are THE FEW, THE PROUD! I’m sure this will get deleted by the admin, but it is what it is. SEMPER FI!!”

The Marine Corps is not an “Elite Organization”

“Play Marine”? Would you give the same advice to a SEAL, to put on his uniform and “play SEAL”? In an elite organization, or any organization really, why would you want to keep guys around who aren’t going to add to mission accomplishment, and just go through the motions to avoid making waves? Before I joined, I expected boot camp and the Marines to be some ultimate rite of passage to manhood. I expected overall camaraderie between the ranks, because we were all Marines. In short, I expected a “few good men”. Expecting all this, I trained for about 2 years prior to shipping out.

When I got to boot camp, they were graduating about 600 Marines a week. How well you could drill was more important than how well you could shoot or PT. The majority of my platoon seemed to have just rolled out of bed one morning and decided to sign up for the Marines. Actual comradeship within the platoon was discouraged in favor of giving a handful of recruits positions of “power” over their fellow recruits if they were willing to treat their peers like shit. It didn’t matter how well you performed, you were still fucked with because it was a safe bet that the majority of the platoon had fucked up somehow. We were starved because it was a safe bet that the majority of recruits were overweight. The PT was a joke, because it was a safe bet that the majority of recruits couldn’t even keep up with that. I was expecting BUDs, I got a beauty pageant.

I came to realize that boot camp wasn’t about weeding out the weak, it was a one-size-fits-all cookie cutter approach to flooding an organization with much needed slave labor. We were treated like shit, because the easiest way to deal with a large group of people is to simply assume that they are all underhanded turds and treat them accordingly, the lowest-common-denominator approach. We weren’t given the opportunity extended to Officers, to drop on request, because we were slaves, not overseers. This allows hundreds of poorly fitting inductees into the organization every month, and initiates them by ingraining into them that the fastest way up the ladder is on the backs of their peers. There are many things that could be changed for the better in the Marines, and the first and foremost would be to encourage those who want to drop out of boot camp to get the fuck out. No more “the fastest way out of here is to graduate” bullshit, it should be “we only want the best of you to stick around”.

Submitted by: freeatlastfreeatlast

Sgt. Thompson: The Yoda of Camp Wilson.

Around 1997, I was sent to CAX at beautiful, scenic Twenty-Nine Palms. In keeping with my hatred (which I have already explained) of the birthday ball, the fact that this exercise spanned the Maween Corpse birthday suited me just fine. This was a double, and halfway through the first exercise, I found that I actually enjoyed these things. I suspect it had something to do with not having to field day everything and deal with the rear echelon’s idiotic bullshit every day. In any event, it was my first arms exercise, and I was somewhat excited as a young jarhead.

During this exercise, I met Sergeant Thompson. A holder of the Skating Expert badge (8th award), Sgt. Thompson taught me more in two months than my own NCOs would in two years. I didn’t have much time in the fleet, so I didn’t have a lot of knowledge about how the corpse actually worked, just how it was supposed to work. In the two months I spent in this environment, I saw a lot. I saw piles of second bootenants (not something that was common in a MALS at the time) acting like spoiled children, taking out their frustrations on anyone who happened to come within arms reach. Most of them were upset and ‘having to sleep in the sand like rats’ and were going to make sure everyone knew it. Sgt. Thompson knew a simple way around this. In the words of Mr. Miyagi, ‘best way to take a punch, no be there’. In this case, by simply avoiding the mess area in the first hour after work, bootenants could be avoided. Small tweaks like this could make one’s life a lot easier with very little effort. From avoiding officers to knowing the right places to stand, and the right buses to catch, and how to spot the patterns in behavior that would reveal the characters I was dealing with, this NCO was like a mustachioed jarhead Jedi.

Eventually, word trickled down that the higher-ups weren’t willing to let a ball weekend go by without some sort of festivities. The rumors flew around that there would be free beer and supermodels. It came down to a couple of stand-up comics, two (moderately attractive) Miller Lite girls, ONE free beer, a DJ, and a piece of cake. Not too bad, for a birthday party for hundreds and hundreds of people held in a sandbox.

We stood for the speeches, ate the mystery meat tetrazzini, and listened to the comics, and enjoyed the DJ. About 2 hours into the festivities, Sgt. Thompson asked me and the other boots to look around. SNCOs and bootenants were starting to fan out along the perimeter. He said he thought we had about 10 minutes to get out before we were commandeered for the working party to clean up the mess. A couple of the others wanted to stay, but several of us left with Sgt. Thompson.

We walked out of the ball, and over the berm line. As we made it back to our lean-to (the Quonset huts hadn’t been erected yet) we piled into the van, and drove over to our shop on the other side of the flight line.

We hung out at the shop for an hour or so (until the end of second shift), smoking cigarettes and bullshitting. After we finished our smoke-n-joke session, we hopped back in the van, and drove back to the camp. Once we made it back to our hooch, we were alone for about half an hour. The guys who had stayed at the ball had been corralled, and ended up raking sand and policing cigarette butts by flashlight.

Over the course of this two-month exercise I learned many other indisputable maween corpse truths at the feet of the master:

1) It doesn’t matter how good a job you do, or even how long it takes, as long as your SNCO has the opportunity to look good doing it. It doesn’t matter if it took 23 men 4 days to make a sandwich, and you spent half a million dollars in the process. If gunny can claim that something innovative took place over the course of this epic sandwich-making for which he and his tremendous leadership skills are directly responsible, he’s a happy gunny. As we all know, happy gunnies equal happy lives.

2) If you have some sort of excellent idea, that will improve unit productivity, save money, etc. it will not be recognized for any reason. Even if you can demonstrate how incredibly efficient it is, nobody will have any interest in implementing it, unless a SNCO has the opportunity to take credit. Additionally, it has to have a built in blame-valve (someplace to put the blame if it doesn’t work as promised, usually the person who actually came up with the idea) to allow the SNCO in question to avoid the responsibility for the idea that was never his in the first place.

3) the fact that a punishment has been meted out is not sufficient. You must be seen to suffer. Cheerfully dealing with the most hideous punishments will only invite more creative torments at the hands of those who want to see you beg. The ability to put on a hang-dog look and appear downtrodden will get you out of far more than any gesture of obeisance ever will.

And many more.

At the time, I discounted many of his teachings as the ravings of a perpetual cynic but, over time, I realized the wisdom of his words.

The Yoda of CAX had gone back to his unit, and been tossed for failing to make SSgt. His wisdom was even lost on the corpse itself.

Thank you Sgt. Thompson, wherever you are.

Submitted by: Billiam201

Marine Corps Mythical History

The United states has two armies. Today we take this for granted, and
don’t question the reasons for funding both the United States Army, and
the United states Marine Corps. But it wasn’t always this way.

There were no Marines in the Continental Army that won the
Revolutionary War. During the Civil War, Congress authorized less than
3,200 men for the Marine Corps, this while the Union Armies totaled
nearly one million men. The fact is, for most of their history the
United States Marine Corps was little more than a security force for the
Navy.

The myth of the Marine Corps as a second army began in WW I. When the
United states entered the war in 1917, over two million U.S. Army
soldiers were deployed to France along with one brigade of marines,
about ten thousand strong. Despite being a tiny fraction of the
American forces fighting in WW I, the Marines managed to make a name for
themselves at the U.S. Army’s expense.

General Pershing, the Commander of all U.S. Forces in France, had
ordered a news blackout that prevented reporters from mentioning
specific units in their dispatches. The purpose of the order was
obvious; to prevent German intelligence from learning about American
troop movements. But one reporter circumvented the order, a war
correspondent for the Chicago Tribune named Floyd Gibbons.

After Mr. Gibbons was severely wounded at the battle of Belleau Wood,
the press corps passed on his dispatches without the approval of Army
censors. The result was a storm of press coverage in the US claiming
that the Huns were being defeated with “the Help of God and a few
Marines”. No mention was made of the thousands of Army soldiers who were
fighting and dying with equal valor.

Floyd Gibbons made no secret of his “friendship and admiration for
the U.S. Marines”. There is no proof that his writings created the
mythology of the Marine Corps, but we do know he wrote a biography of
Baron von Richthofen, more popularly known as the Red Baron. His
description of the German aviator reads as propaganda, not journalism,
and his other works were probably embellished as well.

Today all Marines in basic training are taught that German soldiers
in WW I referred to them as “Devil Dogs”. H.L. Mencken, an American
writing in 1921, clearly states that; “The Germans, during the war,
had no opprobrious nicknames for their foes…Teufelhunde (devil-dogs),
for the American marines, was invented by an American correspondent; the
Germans never used it.”

In addition, there is the legend of “Bulldog Fountain”, where the
U.S. Marine’s mascot originated. This fountain is located in the village
of Belleau, not the wood of the same name. Although the Marines fought
in Belleau Wood, the US Army’s 26th division liberated the village,
three weeks after the Marines had left the area.

There is no documented evidence that Germans ever referred to Marines
as “Devil dogs”, and the Marines never captured the village of Belleau
with its “Bulldog Fountain”. It is not clear exactly where these stories
come from, but their source is most likely Floyd Gibbons. Perhaps the
Marines knew this, because they made him an honorary Marine posthumously
in 1941.

Floyd Gibbons helped enhance the image of the Marines, but the United
States Marine Corps as we know it today came of age in WW II. Most
Americans believe that the Marine Corps won the war in the Pacific,
while the US Army fought in Europe. In fact our Pacific operations were
hampered by a conflict between the Army and the Navy, that split the
theatre in two.

The Navy adamantly refused to place their fleet, (and their Marines),
under the command of the Army. After five weeks of bureaucratic
wrangling, General MacArthur was given command of the Southwest Pacific
theatre, while Admiral Nimitz had jurisdiction over the remainder of the
Pacific ocean. The result, in Macarthur’s own words, was a “divided effort, the… duplication of force (and) undue extension of the war with added casualties and cost”.

The US Army fought the main force of the Japanese Imperial Army in
New Guinea and the Philippines. The Navy and Marines carried out an
“island hopping” strategy that involved amphibious assaults on islands
such as Guadalcanal and Saipan. General Macarthur complained bitterly to
the President that “these frontal attacks by the Navy, as at Tarawa, are tragic and unnecessary massacres of American lives“.

By way of comparison, General Macarthur’s Army killed, captured, or
stranded over a quarter of a million Japanese troops during the New
Guinea campaign, at a cost of only 33,000 US casualties. The Navy and
Marines suffered over 28,000 casualties to kill roughly 20,000 Japanese
on Iwo Jima. Even then, the Army played a greater role than Marines like
to admit; the Army had more divisions assaulting Okinawa than the
Marines.

The famous image of Marines raising the US flag on Mount Suribachi is actually a photograph of the second, staged
flag-raising ceremony. The Marines raised the flag a second time to
replace the original, smaller flag, and to provide the press corps with a
better photo opportunity. That photograph has become one of the most
enduring images of WW II, and served as the model for the Marine Corps
Memorial statue.

The Secretary of the Navy, James Forrestal, was on Iwo Jima that
morning in 1945, and when he saw the Stars and Stripes go up he
declared; ‘The raising of that flag on Suribachi means a Marine Corps
for the next five hundred years!”

In fact the Marine Corps was nearly legislated out of existence two
years later. After the bureaucratic infighting that characterized
inter-service relations during WW II, there was a strong desire among
military professionals to unify the military commands. President Truman
agreed, and in 1946 his administration proposed a bill to unify the
separate service bureaucracies.

Having one budgetary authority for the Armed Forces, and one chain of
command each for land forces, ships, and aircraft makes sense. But this
would have placed the US Navy at a distinct disadvantage. The Navy had
their own air wings aboard their carriers, and their own army, the
Marine Corps.

The Navy and Marine Corps were determined to scuttle this legislation. Marine generals created a secret office code named the Chowder Society
to lobby behind the scenes, (in opposition to their President and
Commander in Chief), and thwart the unification bill before Congress.
The Commandant of the Marine Corps even made an impassioned speech
before Congress to plead for his separate service.

It worked. Congress rejected the Truman administration’s unification
bill, and instead passed the National Security Act of 1947. This Act
guaranteed separate services, with their own independent budgets, and
was a victory for the Navy and Marine Corps.

In addition, the Marines succeeded in having their separate force
structure written into the language of the legislation. It is very
unusual for Congress to dictate the actual composition of a military
service. Yet the National Security Act mandates that the Marines Corps
must maintain “not less than three combat divisions and three aircraft
wings and such land combat, aviation, and other services as necessary to
support them“.

President Truman was furious, and military professionals were appalled. General Eisenhower characterized the Marines as “being
so unsure of their value to their country that they insisted on writing
into the law a complete set of rules and specifications for their
future operations and duties. Such freezing of detail…is silly, even
vicious.”

The war between the Army and Marines would get more vicious in Korea.
On November 27th, 1950 a division of Marines 25,000 strong, was ordered
to proceed along the west side of the Chosin reservoir, while a much
smaller task force of 2500 Army troops went up the eastern side. Waiting
for them were 120,000 troops of the Chinese Communist 9th Army Group.

The Army soldiers fought a running battle for three days against a
Chinese force eight times their size, in temperatures as low as minus 35
degrees. Despite the death of two commanding officers, the task force
lumbered south with over 600 dead and wounded soldiers loaded into
trucks, fought through repeated ambushes, and was even mistakenly bombed
by US Marine aircraft. Finally, just four miles from safety, the convoy
was cut off by the Chinese and annihilated.

385 men made it to the safety of American lines by crossing the frozen Chosin Reservoir.

The First Marine Division, with the help of allied air power, managed
to fight their way out of the Chinese encirclement. Marines claimed
that the Army had disgraced itself, and passed on stories of US soldiers
throwing down their weapons and feigning injuries. A Marine Chaplain
even made statements to the press and wrote an article accusing army
soldiers of cowardice.

There were so few officers and men left from the Army task force that
the Marine’s claims were accepted as fact. But newly released Chinese
documents prove otherwise. The Army task force fought bravely against
overwhelming odds before being destroyed, and their stubborn defense
bought time for the Marines to escape the encirclement.

Nevertheless, Marines to this day hold up the fight at the Chosin reservoir as proof of their superiority over the Army.

In Vietnam, a Marine regiment at Khe Sanh refused to come to the aid
of a Special Forces outpost only four miles from their perimeter. On
Febuary 7th, 1968, the camp at Lang Vei was overran by heavily armed
North Vietnamese troops during an all-night battle. The Marines had
earlier agreed to reinforce the camp in the event of an attack, but two
requests for assistance were denied.

General Westmoreland himself had to order the Marines to provide
helicopters for Special forces personnel, so they could be airlifted
into the besieged outpost. By this time the post had been overrun, at a
cost of 208 soldiers killed and another 80 wounded. Ironically, two
months later this same Marine regiment would be besieged at Khe Sanh,
and they would be relieved by Army troops of the First Cavalry Division.

During Operation Desert Storm 90,000 Marines attacked Iraqi forces
alongside over 500,000 US Army and coalition troops. Yet the Marines
garnered 75 percent of the newsprint and TV coverage. This was not an
accident.

The Commanding General of the Marines in Iraq, Gen. Walt Boomer, was
the former Director of Public Affairs for the Corps. He issued the
following order to Marine units in the theater:

“CMC [Commandant of the Marine Corps, then General A. M. Gray]
desires maximum media coverage of USMC … The news media are the tools
through which we can tell Americans about the dedication, motivation,
and sacrifices of their Marines. Commanders should include public
affairs requirements in their operational planning to ensure that the
accomplishments of our Marines are reported to the public.“

During the war Marine officers used military communications systems
to transmit stories for reporters in the field, and even assigned
personnel to carry press dispatches to rear areas. The Marine Commander
also had his own entourage of reporters complete with satellite uplinks,
and used them to good effect. He received far more air time than his
Army counterparts.

The US Army performed a “Hail Mary” operation that trapped Iraq’s
Republican Guard divisions and fought numerous running battles in the
Iraqi desert. But no one saw them. Instead the press focused on Lt. Gen.
Walter Boomer parading triumphantly through the streets of Kuwait City.

When George Bush the Second launched his misguided invasion of Iraq,
the Marines were once again included, and this time the goal was
Baghdad. The invasion, which began on March 20th, 2003, called for a
two pronged assault on Baghdad. The Army’s 5th Corps would advance from
the desert west of the Euphrates river, while the First Marine division
was ordered to cross the Euphrates and make a parallel advance through
central Iraq.

The invasion did not go well for the Marines. In several cities,
including Umm al Qasr and Nasiriya, their units suffered heavy
casualties fighting remnants of the Iraqi Army and fedayeen guerrillas.
Since the Marines had fewer armored vehicles, and they were exposed to a
more tenacious enemy, their progress was slower than the Army’s.

Major General Mattis, the commanding general of the Marines in Iraq,
was not pleased. He repeatedly pressured his regiments to make greater
speed, and this pressure grew more intense as the Marines lagged further
behind Army units. On the morning of April 3rd, the First Marine
Regiment, commanded by Colonel Dowdy, was ordered to drive to the town
of al-Kut.

The city was another choke point, where Iraqi fedayeen guerrillas
could ambush Marine convoys in city streets. As soon as his Marines
reached the city, they began taking fire. Colonel Dowdy could not forget
the mauling another regiment had received in Nasiriya, where 17 Marines
were killed and another seventy were wounded.

He had to make a choice. His orders were to proceed to al-Kut, but
the decision to push through or bypass the town was up to him. However,
Colonel Dowdy was receiving mixed signals from his superiors. According
to him “there was a lot of confusion”, some officers were recommending
an attack, others urged withdrawal.

Colonel Dowdy decided to bypass al-Kut. His regiment would take an
alternative route to Baghdad that was safer, but the detour of 170 miles
meant that the Marines fell further behind schedule. Colonel Dowdy‘s
superiors were furious with his decision.

After the withdrawal from al-Kut, General Mattis and other staff
officers let the Colonel know that his regiment was to make greater
speed. That night on the road to Baghdad, vehicles of the First Marine
Regiment were ordered to drive the highways of Iraq with their headlights on, irregardless of security. But their progress was not good enough, the Army‘s Fifth Corps had already reached Baghdad.

Colonel Joe Dowdy was relieved of his command the following day. The
Marine Corps will never admit it, but he was fired because he failed to
carry out the Corps most important mission in Iraq: Colonel Dowdy failed
to upstage the US Army by being the first to reach Baghdad.

The Marines would return to Iraq one year later, when the First
Marine Expeditionary Force assumed responsibility for Al Anbar province,
which includes the city of Fallujah.

During the change of command ceremony Lt. Gen. James T. Conway of the
I MEF proclaimed that; “Although Marines don’t normally do
nation-building, they will tell you that once given the mission, nobody
can do it better.” The Marines took control of the area from the U.S.
Army’s 82nd Airborne Division, and they made no secret of their distain
for the Army’s strategy in Iraq.

Before deploying, General Conway had told the New York Times
“I don’t envision using that tactic“, when asked about Army troops
using air strikes against the insurgents. “I don’t want to condemn what
[Army] people are doing. I think that they are doing what they think
they have to do.”

On March 30th, General Conway told a reporter that “There’s no place
in our area of operation that we won’t go, and we have taken some
casualties in the early going making that point“. The next day four
civilian contractors were killed and mutilated in Fallujah, and five
Marines also lost their lives. The Marines sealed off the city and
attempted to reassert control over Fallujah, but the insurgents proved
to be more determined than expected.

When their patrols came under heavy fire the lightly armed Marines
had only two choices; Fight it out with the insurgents on foot, or call
in artillery and air strikes. The inevitable result was scores of
Marines killed or wounded, and hundreds of civilian casualties. The
world was appalled by the carnage in Fallujah, and the Marines were
called off.

While Marines were fighting in Fallujah, the US Army was heavily
engaged against militiamen loyal to Muqtata al-Sadr in cities throughout
Iraq. But in contrast to the Marine’s failure to recapture Fallujah,
the US Army’s heavy armored vehicles could enter hostile cities with
impunity. They brought al-Sadr to heel after two months of fighting,
while suffering relatively few casualties.

An uneasy truce was made between the US Army and al-Sadr’s militia,
that would last until the Marines again became involved. On July 31st
2004, the 11th Marine Expeditionary Unit replaced Army units in the holy
city of Najaf, headquarters of Muqtata al-Sadr. Just five days later,
al-Sadr’s militia would again be waging open war against the US, and the
Marines would be calling for reinforcements.

The Marines began skirmishing with al-Sadr’s militiamen as soon as
they were given responsibility for Najaf. After the uprising in April,
US Army units had avoided driving past al-Sadr’s house as part of the
informal truce, but this would not do for the Marines. The second Shia
uprising began after Marines in Najaf provoked al-Sadr by driving their
patrols right up to his stronghold.

A firefight ensued, and al-Sadr’s militiamen took up arms in cities
throughout Iraq in a replay of the uprising in April. The Marines had
not just picked a fight with Muqtada in Najaf, they had engaged his
militia in an ancient cemetery that abutted the Imam Ali Mosque, Shiite
Islam’s holiest shrine. And they did this without informing the Army
chain of command, or the Iraqi government.

According to Maj. David Holahan, second in command of the Marine unit
in Najaf, “We just did it”. But in a replay of the Fallujah assault,
the Marines faced an enemy that they were not prepared for. Within hours
of launching their attack on August 5th, the Marines were pinned down,
and requesting assistance.

Unfortunately for the Marines, their rash attack on al-Sadr’s
headquarters had sparked another revolt by his militiamen. Army units
were once again fighting the Mahdi army in cities throughout Iraq. When
the Army’s Fifth Cavalry Regiment received orders to reinforce the
beleaguered Marines, they were deployed against al-Sadr’s militia in the
outskirts of Bagdhad, 120 miles away.

The Fifth Cavalry arrived in Najaf after a two day drive through
insurgent controlled territory. By then any opportunity to capture
al-Sadr had been lost, because the press, and the Islamic world, were
focused on the Imam Ali Mosque and the adjacent cemetery. Any attack on
Shiite Islam’s holiest shrine, where Muqtata al-Sadr was holed up, would
have had disastrous consequences for the US war effort.

In Fallujah and Najaf, inexperienced Marine units picked fights with
insurgents, and in both cases ended up handing the enemy a strategic
victory. Their failure to recapture Fallujah made the city a rallying
cry for Islamic militarism worldwide, (that is until the second US
assault rendered Fallujah uninhabitable). The Marine’s botched attempt
to capture Muqtata al-Sadr has only strengthened his hand.

Today there are 23,000 Marines in Iraq, out of a total 138,000 U.S.
Armed Forces personnel. Marines are 17 percent of our total force, yet
they have suffered 29 percent of all U.S. casualties; 530 of the more
than 1,820 U.S. service personnel killed in Iraq. The Marine’s
aggressive tactics combined with a lack of armored firepower has proven
lethal, their bravery notwithstanding.

The United States Marines pride themselves on being better
than the US Army. They are harder, more gung-ho, and they possess some
magic that enables them to do things the US Army can’t do. If this is
not true, (as recent events in Iraq suggest), then there is no reason
for a separate Marine Corps.

President Harry Truman once stated that Marines; “Have a propaganda
machine that is almost equal to Stalin’s.” The Marines have always
advertised themselves, but in Truman’s day, they at least had something
to sell. The original raison d’etre of the USMC was their ability to
carry out amphibious landings on hostile beaches.

The truth is, the US Army conducted the biggest amphibious assault in
our nation’s history when they captured the Normandy beaches. And
neither the Army or the Marines have assaulted an enemy held beach since
the Korean war, over fifty years ago. In every subsequent conflict
Soldiers and Marines have fought in the same way, using similar
equipment and tactics.

The Marines are in fact a second Army, and since they compete with
the Army for funds, missions, and prestige, their real enemy is… the US
Army.

However, the Marine Corps has an unfair advantage in this
competition. Since the end of Desert Storm the US Army has been
downsized by one third, losing over 200,000 troops and eight combat
divisions. By Contrast the Marines have lost only twenty thousand
personnel. The reason is the National Security Act of 1947, which
prevents any changes in the force structure of the Marines.

Today’s United States Marine Corps is only slightly larger than the
US Army in Iraq. That war is stretching our Army to the breaking point.
The obvious solution is to merge the Army and Marine corps into one
service.

The savings would add up to tens of billions of dollars when their
training, logistics, administration, and headquarters were merged. The
personnel shortages that are now crippling both services would
disappear. And so would the rivalry between the Army and the Marine
Corps.

Submitted by: Anonymous

Let’s talk about going UA

I think something that should be discussed is the lack of awareness of the high rate of UA’s in both the active and reserve component of the marine corps. And I mean A LOT. In my platoon alone at least 10 have gone UA and that is not accounting for those in the rest of the company.

One thing is for certain, when a person hates a place, you can not bind them to it regardless of the repercussions. I have witnessed friends use any means to get out, I have seen friends get hurt and be tossed under the rug and ridiculed and belittled as if they were the enemy. It’s sad the culture that has become the marine corps.

We’re told that it’s great from the beginning with it’s promises of camaraderie, leadership, integrity, all flew out the window the second one hits the fleet, active or reserves. The lack of informing applicants of their options because of recruiters wanting to meet their quotas, or fear being the recipient of the boot. Applicants days away from boot camp being dumped by their wives for another, recruits attempting suicide to get out, marines going UA, doing drugs, being injured, etc.

Whether it’d be intentional or not, it has always bothered me. But what has bothered me the most was the lack of care. The lack of care from the “leaders”, “fellows”, and attachments. I have had good friends do all of the above, and I won’t lie I have thought about it in the past as well.

I and the rest of the marines whom have had the bitter taste of reality come to the front so much that they have come to the point of wondering whether what we are doing is worth it or not.

The same leader one day who is “motivated” in the presence of leadership is the same person the next day laughing off people who are gone. I’m tired of the lack of professionalism, the lack of care, the deception, the THIEVERY, the back stabbing. If recruiting posters really showed the reality of the situation, every poster would have an asterisk attached and a brief description of what someone is to expect.

Now, as I get my rant out of the way, and as I reflect on the years that have passed and the people who have done the things they did to get out of the corpse, I don’t blame them. I truly do not blame them one bit. The marine corps sucks, and those who say otherwise are lying.

This branch has built up too much momentum in the direction it’s headed, and the generals and politicians have thrown money and powerpoints at this organization thinking it’ll be for the better but what they fail to see is that it hasn’t gotten any better for decades.

The best image that comes to my mind is that of a coin that is minted perfectly and once it’s damaged, rusted, and worn, can not be utilized anymore and is tossed out and condemned. God forbid you become injured or ill, because there will be no use for you.

I know I’m beating a dead horse but this is a great site that has been made to make the general public aware of the situation the marines find itself in, truly.

Submitted by: broman

Rants of a Boot Marine Part IV: Dying Slowly Inside

I get it, the POG life is supposed to be easy and the Grunt Life sucks. You know what, both equally suck. I don’t care what you say it is, both just suck. Let’s leave it at that.

I don’t know who else feels this way, but the Marine Corps sure as hell doesn’t build you into “a man”, a “gentleman”, or “ladylike” or whatever it is.

Okay, I take that back, maybe it can teach you how to dress well, but that’s completely on you to have a good appearance or not. THAT right there, is an adult decision, something that sure can make you a man/adult, or continue looking like whatever you were previously.

Like other Marines who are venting their anger out on here, I see it all: So called professional Marines who party it up like college students, treating their barracks like a dorm, “lady-like” Marines who soon become infamous barracks bunnies, and being treated like a child/messed around by NCO’s who claim they get you because they once were in your shoes. Okay, then why mistreat the Marines under you? Because you’re trying to one up somebody from your past?

I have only been in for a year and I feel burnt out. I just feel physically, mentally, spiritually, and emotionally taxed, wanting it all to go away whether it’d be drinking or going to a massage parlor for “discreet” massages. That sure as hell doesn’t work, it made me feel emptier.

The Marines Corps, being known for making simple things hard, has made Admin into some monster of itself. My shop is now working almost the same time as a SDA, which will make some of you laugh, but if we’re all missing out on chow hall hours, not coming back to the barracks until 2100, and having to show up around 0530-600, might as well get Commuted Rations or even a bit of an incentive pay?

Being in the shop and watching all these Marine VEERPing out, or soon retiring, I wish I was in their shoes badly. I wish I was that Marine, walking into the S-1 with the last space to fill in, getting that DD-214, and driving out without looking back.

Some people say, “Hey look, maybe if you took some leave just to decompress, maybe that’ll work!”

Sure, but if only I had enough leave days, 18 total isn’t enough.

I want to save up all those days for a trip to Europe next year, provide that I could get through the bureaucratic process to get Foreign Leave approved. I tried saving by being willing to take Special Liberty instead of Leave for Christmas, but was forced to take it when they found out I was flying back later than the time Liberty was secured (0730 on the West Coast, I wanted to fly back at 1630). There goes 6 days!!!

But really, you can’t imagine even if I had those 6 days, I literally hoped out of where I worked. I didn’t care what Marines were thinking, I was just that damn happy! It sucked coming back though, feeling like 6 days went by way too fast.

Hence why if I wanted to take leave, I’d want to take an entire month. Hell, I’ll even beg for PTAD before Christmas if I have to, but I just want time off. That’s how bad it is.

Sorry if it sounds super random or doesn’t make sense guys, I just know if I write something, I feel somewhat better than resorting to wasting money on “happy” massages. But that’s a completely different story for a different website.

Submitted by: BrassNecked14

Ballad of QA, Part IV

(or is it 1?, I can never remember)

Having reached the end of my 30 days restriction and EPD, the time came for my freedom. I stopped by the legal office on the last day, and procured a letter explaining that I was a free man after my last restriction muster at 2045.

I arrived at my final muster at 2245, in my own car, driven by a friend (I couldn’t drive, as I was on restriction). Having gotten my sheet signed, and signed the SDO copy, I hit the men’s room, and drove off into the sunset (which any single marine knows means a strip club.)

I had been stuck in the barracks for a month, but the ninja-punch hadn’t taken any money from me. This left me a free man, on a Friday night, with three paychecks burning a hole in my pocket. Being a bit of a snob, I had never frequented the strip clubs near any of the bases. I went to the higher end places, that had at least one scotch whiskey that wasn’t Johnny Walker. Having arrived with my friends, the doorman (a coworker at the security company I worked for off-duty) obviously recognized me, cleared my table, and gave me a slew of free drink tickets (this was the main reason I could afford to patronize this establishment). On my route to my table, I was asked by three different girls why I hadn’t been by for my Friday lap dance in what seemed like forever. At this point, my friends realized what I had been getting up to after work on Friday, Saturday and Sunday nights, and settled in to enjoy the ride.

We made it back to the barracks at the relatively sane hour of 3am, and went to our respective rooms.

For those who may be wondering why I had pestered the legal chief for a letter stating the obvious (that I was no longer restricted, nor usable for bitch-work once my sentence had been served) guess who was pounding on my door at just after 7am the next morning?

I dragged myself, barely conscious and slightly hung over, to my door to find QA, who wanted to know why I had missed my 7am muster, since he was the duty NCO that day. (I had never been required to check in with the barracks duty, merely to report to him/her that I was leaving the barracks for a meal or religious observance, all of my check-ins were with the SDO.) Being the duty NCO, he had a copy of my restriction muster, and was of the opinion that, since my restriction ended after 1630 on Friday, that meant I was on restriction all weekend as well, and he would be using me to police call the barracks (this wasn’t new, I had done it several times already.)

I pointed out that all the blocks were full, and that there were no places left for me or him to sign. He told me that, since I had missed my sign-in, he had already informed the SDO, the GDO, and the officer of the day, who were already on their way. I had been prepared to furnish him a copy of my letter, but this was about to be too much fun. (I was smart enough to have made several copies. He was absolutely the type of guy to tear up a single copy, leaving me with no evidence.)

We waited outside of my room for everyone to arrive, and QA gave his side of the story to each as they arrived. Needless to say the screaming awoke many hungover marines, who did NOT appreciate being awakened at 6am by QA ranting about discipline, rules, and adherence to orders. Once the OOD arrived and heard the story he asked me to explain myself. He wanted to know, in no uncertain terms, just where I thought I got off. If I was on restriction, that meant I was on restriction. That meant no booze, and no leaving the base. I was clearly hung over, and still had the stamps from the bars on the back of my hand. I had exactly 2 seconds to give him a good ******* reason why I had chosen to disobey the lawful orders of a LtCol in the United States marine corps.

At this point I asked the OOD for a moment, walked over to my desk, and handed him a copy of the letter from the legal chief. He read aloud to the assembled masses (to include several spectators who, despite the efforts of the staff duty clerk, had congregated to see what I was up to) that my restriction had expired with my final restriction muster, and I was of course a free man, as of 2245 the night before. The fact that the command had not accounted for the fact that this would leave me out on a Friday, going into a 96 was neither my fault, nor my problem.

Needless to say, the SDO, GDO, and OOD were not happy to have had their time wasted by an overzealous sergeant who was plainly carrying a grudge. The fact that these men had all been called within moments of assuming their posts, to race to a barracks and find nothing of note was not going to help matters. QA, now suitably humiliated, had managed to make a big enough wave that, over the next several hours, the barracks would be visited by my SNCOIC, OIC, SgtMaj and even the old man himself. QA found himself explaining this story in great detail to the entire chain of command for the better part of the day. I was happy to furnish copies of the letter to anyone who asked.

Again, I may have enjoyed this a bit more than was entirely healthy.

Submitted by: Billiam201

If you are still going to join, here is some advice.

Well, I can see that you’re not going to be swayed by arguments or experiences, and that you’re going to join up after graduating high school. To be honest, even if I’d known this site existed before I enlisted, I’d probably have done what you’re doing right now. You see the Marine Corps as a band of brothers where you strive towards a noble goal. If you’re anything like I think you are, you’ll have memorized the leadership traits and principles, all three verses of the Hymn, general orders, and love history in general and Marine Corps history in particular. Since you’re not going to be swayed by anything we say, I guess the best I can do is give you some advice to make your time in more likely to be less sphincter-busting:

1.) Boot camp is three months long, after which you spend about a month or two in SOI, and then either the fleet or the schoolhouse depending on what job you got. You’re then going to be locked into that job for the next four+ years. Don’t bother focusing on initial training, what matters is the four+ years you’re going to be spending doing a job. You have to be absolutely certain that you have the job you want in print BEFORE you ship. I don’t mean a contract with ten jobs on it and your recruiter’s word that you’ll get the one in the middle, I mean a no shit contract for one job that you think you’ll enjoy doing for four years.

2.) If you get to request a duty station, they have you write down an O for overseas, W for west coast, or E for east coast. Write down either W or E if you can’t get W. AVOID OKI LIKE IT’S THE FUCKING PLAGUE. Trust me on this, you want to get some time in a state-side station before you hit that place. If you go there as a Cpl, it’s a very different experience than if you go as a PFC or Lance.

3.) Get your recruiters to let you try on different (bates) boot, shoe, and cami sizes before you go, make sure to check out wide sizes for boots, and then remember those sizes when you hit receiving. There should be a base somewhere near you that has an exchange, just have them take you there. You’re paying for that stuff, you should be sure it fits you and you don’t have to replace it all with new shit when you hit the fleet.

4.) When they ask you if you want to pay the $100 a month for the Montgomery GI bill for 12 months, politely tell them to go to hell. You don’t need to pay for the Post 9/11 GI bill. Go to these websites to learn more about the Post-9/11 GI bill, which is a better deal than the Montgomery ever was:
http://www.military.com/educat…
http://www.benefits.va.gov/gib…

5.) MCIs are little tests that everyone cheats on, and can be worth college credit. They probably won’t apply to any real degree you could want after you get out (unless you get your BA in weapons of mass destruction from Patriot Bible University or some shit) but they do help with your class standing. Most Universities have a limited number of seats in their classes, so the more credits you have, the sooner you can enroll for classes. This hasn’t bothered me, because I’m an honors student and I get to apply a few weeks before the upper classmen, but I have about fifty credits from MCIs and stuff sitting on my college transcript that don’t apply to my degree. If nothing else, it gives you something to do that could potentially benefit you in service, and might benefit you when you get out. Trust me, nobody gives two shits if you memorized the drill manual once you get out. Just be sure to do the ones that count for more college credit first, the list I used is several years old and from a different branch, but it’s the best that’s out there currently as far as I know:
https://answers.yahoo.com/ques…

6.) When you leave boot camp and hit the fleet, do not do any of the following:
– Buy a new vehicle at high interest rates, or any vehicle that you can’t pay off in 6 months or less.
– Walk off base in boots, a backpack, 7.62 design clothing, a cowboy outfit, or with your dogtags hanging out of your shirt.
– Go to the strip clubs or bars outside the main gate.
– Drink underage.
– Marry your high school girlfriend to get off base and higher pay.
– Marry a stripper/hooker (you’ll be surprised to see how often that happens).
– Use BAMCIS as an expletive in a sentence.
– Talk about your boot camp/SOI stories.
– Get a moto tat or meat tag (a tattoo with your social security number on it is a bad idea).
– Walk around a boot trap. If you’re stateside, there’s areas where the boots accumulate off base called boot traps. Salesmen know where those places are and are looking to rob you blind through scams, people who’ve been there a while know where those places are, just ask.

7.) Understand how the promotion system works for E5 and below. The Marine Corps is unique among the armed forces in that it doesn’t care if you’re good at your job for promotion. Military Occupational Specialty (MOS, your job) proficiency matters dick, what counts is whether or not your SNCOs like you. Different MOSs have different cutting scores to pick up Cpl and Sgt. Check out this list:

http://www.killfoot.com/cuttin…

This month, say you have a 1400. If you’re a 2147 LAV mech, your cutting score to meet or beat is a 1335, you might be a CPL before you hit the fleet, and you’ll definitely be one as soon as as you rate a score. If you’re an 1812 M1A1 crewman on the other hand, your cutting score for Cpl is a 1694, and you have a few years to go. Once you max out your P/CFT, rifle, and education scores, there’s really nothing you can do to raise your score; you get to sit around and get fucked with for however long it takes to pick up. If you’re willing to be the office bitch and pick up faster, get to know Excell and PowerPoint before you ship.

8.) Cleaning:
– Windex is great for wooden ledges and planes, don’t use pledge, it attracts dust. Don’t use Windex on your corframs or any other shiny “leather” or “brass” article of clothing. It leaves a residue that gives off a rainbow shine.
– Be sure to use Brasso on your door knob and shiny things, not uniform items.
– The grout in your bathroom wasn’t white when they put it in, but it’s going to have to be now. You can use white-out, or this product:
http://www.livelovediy.com/201…
– Pull your carpet out of your room (if you have one) the first time you can, and sweep, vacuum, mop, and use Mop & Glo under and around it. Then bring the carpet back in and duct tape that thing to the floor.
– Get two shower curtains, one’s an inspection curtain and the other is the one you use, just put the one you use in a trash bag in something you can lock for field day.
– When you’re buffing the floor (if you didn’t take my advice and chose
Oki) lean back to make it go left, lean forward to make it go right.
Don’t let on that you’re able to do that though, or your ass is going to
be up till three every Friday morning buffing and stripping and buffing
and stripping the no-buff floors of your barracks.

9.) Uniforms:
– Determine the length of your hanger rod in inches, divide that by the
number of things you’re going to be hanging from it and that’s how many
inches of separation you should have between each of your hangers. Use
your ribbon measuring tool to be certain.
– Don’t use edge dressing on your corframs if you can avoid it, it makes a mess, looks like shit, and is generally worthless.
– Once you’ve accumulated what you think is going to be the last ribbon you’re going to get, order a rack from here:
https://www.ultrathin.com/
It looks good and no, there’s no order that says only drill instructors can wear them.
– Use a web belt to back your ribbons, it’s the perfect length and you should have oodles of spares coming out of boot camp.
– Don’t use starch on your cammies, they say not to on the tag inside of those $120 outfits. You light up like a Christmas tree on NVGs if you do, it shortens their life-span and can stain them. Just wash them and hang them in the shape you want when they come out of the drier.
– For fucks sake, don’t starch your cover into a rigid shape. Just wash it, don’t send it through the dryer, and pull the sides up so it dries in the shape you want it.
– Don’t iron your Chucks. There’s super glue in the seams of the shirt to keep them there that you’ll melt if you do.

10.) Lastly, mental dissonance. If you’re anything like I was, you’re going to hit a point where you realize that the Marine Corps isn’t a rite of passage, and that you’re being judged based off of your ability to parrot and follow orders regardless of their validity, nothing else. At this point, you’re going to have to make a decision, do you turn on your peers and step on them to get up, or do you hold to your honor and get passed over for those who are willing to play the game? Are you a prisoner, or a convict? I hope that you make a decision you can live with when that time comes.

– freeatlastfreeatlast

Why Do Marines Need Such big Balls?

Ok, I know we have all had this complaint, but I haven’t heard or read any really high-quality, nostril-flaring rants about it, so I’m going to give it a rip.

We all know that the marine dress blue uniform has exactly three purposes:

1) To be worn on television commercials.

2) To be worn to the USMC birthday ball.

3) To be worn by the Silent Drill Team (a purpose stunningly similar to item 1)

Whereas the USMC birthday ball has only one purpose: to give marines who aren’t a member of the Silent Drill Team a chance to wear those shiny dress blues.

I can’t speak for how much a set of dress blues cost nowadays, but when I last owned a set (let’s just say there were still two towers in NYC, so my memory may be a little faded) the jacket was around $200. Of course that was just a jacket, and it had the crappiest brass buttons you could imagine. If you wanted nice ones those ran around $100 a set. Let’s not forget that this came without the chicken/ball/hooks, for another $10. Gloves, white belt, buckle appropriate to your rank, special red/gold chevrons and you’re in for another $100 or so. You have now blown an entire paycheck on a jacket.

Unless of course you had had actual medals, and wanted to wear those, instead of ribbons. Of course, you weren’t issued anodized medals, so you’ll need to pick those up at $25-$50 apiece, depending on which ones they were.

So, if I wanted a set of dress blues, I would have been out around $400 ($600 with my medals) for the sole purpose of paying another $80 (or the bargain price of $150 for a pair) to attend a ‘voluntary’ function.

I doubt I am alone in saying that, apart from threats and intimidation, many marines would elect not to attend this farce. As most know, torment awaits those who don’t attend the ball, most times. In my personal opinion, telling me that attending is voluntary, but I will spend the entire time on a working party cleaning up the messes left by the drunken revelers if I don’t go, doesn’t count as voluntary. If you have to have sentries standing outside to make sure I don’t leave before the appointed time, it’s not a voluntary function. Just tell me it’s mandatory, rather than insulting my intelligence by making up some song and dance about how I had a choice. (By that logic the prisoners at Leavenworth have a choice, they can stay ‘voluntarily’ or be shot trying to leave.)

My unit in San Diego was enormous. Large enough that there were precious few facilities large enough to accommodate an enormous horde by the time all the marines brought their wives/husbands/girlfriends/boyfriends along. As a result, ball attendance those three years wasn’t that unique brand of voluntary and compulsory that it was in my other two service years, you just didn’t get the half day off the day of the ball, and the next day off. (Of course, it was widely whispered that your marks or fit-reps would reflect your absence, but I never saw any evidence of this)

This was the best part of ball season, as far as I was concerned. I got to sit at the barracks, watch the drunken sword fights (participate in a few) show up at work the next day, hang out with my people (the angry, disgruntled and unmotivated), answer phones and go home to mess with everyone just waking up with a massive hangover. We were allowed to do this because there were flight operations to support, and someone had to be there in case a flying squadron needed something.

One year, the ball was in Laughlin, Nevada at a low-budget casino/resort with a campground across the street. Now, as an added bonus, we got to pay for a hotel room as part of our ball ticket, and a bus would be provided if we didn’t want to drive. We would not be allowed into the casino, nor to drink outside of the ball area. Additionally, if we weren’t bringing a date (enabling us to pay for both beds in the room) the command did not have the time or the inclination to take room requests, so you might have ended up paired with someone you truly hated. Sounds like a blast doesn’t it?

Now that we have been duly threatened, and spent a month’s pay on our uniform and tickets, we finally get to go to the ball itself. This should be a decent experience, shouldn’t it? Hang out with your pals, have a few drinks, maybe even make fun of all the ugly, fat dependapotamus herds slowly making the rounds of the dance floor, while yelling at the boots for ‘leering’ at them.

Not so fast, my friend. You now get to spend upwards of an hour listening to speeches from your CO (who obviously didn’t get his job for his public speaking skills), the SgtMaj, and that grizzled old warrant officer that every unit has, who has been in since the ‘shores of tripoli’ line was written, and has a social security number of 17. After all this, we get to eat our $80 piece of dry, lukewarm chicken and wilted salad, before listening to another speech from CWO-4 leatherbrains before he cuts a cake, making sure to allow all the officers to get a picture of it.

After the cake has been passed out, now we can get to the fun, right?

Hold on, devil nuts.

That beer that you’ve been rubbing your head and wishing you could have all night? Get in line. 1000 other guys have been begging for the same beer, and were inevitably closer to the bar than you. On top of that, your date wants a drink, and you may have a one-drink-at-a-time limit to discourage abuses at the ball (just for E5 and below, of course).

After several minutes of being pressed like a gabardine ham, you make your way back to your table, carrying two drinks, to find your date being systematically stalked by your superiors. They have somehow been drinking heavily all evening, and are frustrated with the red-faced rhino-beast at their table, so they want to take a crack at the girl you brought. You are forced to laugh at their jokes, and try to find a remotely courteous way to get her out of there, before Gunny’s eyeballs actually pop from his head and land in her décolletage.

After enduring three to four hours of this siege, largely spent apologizing profusely to the young lady who ‘thought it would be fun’ to go to the ball, you make a run for it, and are stopped at the door by the bootenant that the old man has cleverly placed in the smoking area to ‘discourage’ early departures. If you have a particularly clever girlfriend (which I did – once) she makes some remark about how badly she needs you to help her out of her dress once you get her home <wink> and the butter-barred door guard will let you go.

So now, still hungry, broke and wandering the streets in a dress blue uniform dragging along a young lady in an evening dress, you have to either find a cab (if you could afford more than one drink) or whatever means you arrived at the ball. If it was that bus, you’re still fucked. It’s not leaving until the old man is too drunk to prevent it.

Admittedly, sometimes this is the fun part. As you leave the ball, you wander around downtown, go to a couple of places, maybe even hit an In-N-Out Burger in dress blues, wearing a sword. Most of the time, you’re exhausted, let down, and just want to go home.

And the officers will spend the entire next year sitting around and wondering why they have to force you to go to this thing.

Submitted by: Billiam201

The Ballad of QA, Part III: Revenge of the Shitbag

When last we left our intrepid author, there was finally a charge sheet on its way down from legal for failing to properly sort cigarette butts.

In this case, as I was deposed QA was unable to produce enough evidence to get past the sergeant major, leaving QA embarrassed and seeking revenge.

Unfortunately for me, nobody is NJP-proof. They will get you if they want you. Also during this time, I was struggling with my weight due to some injuries I had suffered.

Soon, the mando PT gods would come calling, and sure enough, I was shortly found up an unsanitary tributary lacking adequate means of propulsion.

To make a long story short, I was charged with UA for failing to go to PT which I had not been assigned to yet. The SSgt wrote a statement that he had ordered me to go, but had been unable to contact me to sign my assignment letter because I had been on leave. (The fact that I had not been on leave was completely irrelevant to my case)

I showed up to my first restriction muster with a gold star in place of the crossed rifles on my rank, which the SDO (whom I had known for some time) found moderately amusing, we laughed a bit, and I put on the proper rank. In our conversation I remarked that I had actually not even been a sergeant long enough to have had my uniforms done, and the only thing that had been done was the alpha blouse that I had hand-sewn the Sgt. chevrons on the night before.

We had a good laugh that, in this case, not being ‘squared away’ actually paid pretty big dividends. The half-month pay actually being less than having the base tailor do the ranks, and then have everything cleaned and pressed again.

About this time, QA shows up (to make sure I am properly suffering under the yoke I am supposed to be under) and overheard that last part. I was now ‘fraternizing’ with the SDO, and was being blatantly disrespectful to the uniform.

(How I am supposed to be disrespectful to my own property is STILL beyond my comprehension)

As QA whined to my superiors about how horrible a person I am, he came to the realization that I was suddenly the junior corporal in the shop. I can still almost hear his little shoulder devil, cackling like an inbred hyena and drooling on itself, as he realized that he ‘had me right where he wanted me’.

Now he could send me on every shitty little assignment he could think of (The fact that this got me out of the shop, and I actually enjoyed it was completely beside the point). Additionally, I actually read the disciplinary manuals, much to his chagrin, and my amusement. I discovered that (because I had to muster with the SDO every 2 hours all weekend) I rated to be escorted to the PX during the business day, to purchase whatever essentials I might need. Not many members of the shop had cars, and I wasn’t allowed to drive mine. The escort also had to be senior to me, so that left three corporals and a sergeant (besides QA, who certainly wasn’t doing it himself. He would have to have stopped surfing blackvoices.com) eligible to escort me. I was friendly with them all, and we took full advantage.

Given that Miramar had greatly increased in population, it only makes sense to knock down the chow hall, and build a smaller one. As a result the lines were horrendous. This left my escort and I waiting forever to get our food, and if we weren’t in a great hurry, so be it. Upon finishing our meals, we proceeded to the exchange, where the first thing I did was get in line for a haircut. Since many other marines were trying to squeeze in haircuts during lunch, this took a while (I had decided to cultivate the low-reg to end all low-regs, just to piss off QA at this point). After that, we headed into the exchange itself, just in time for the dependa-wave, as they all finished grazing with their husbands and headed inside to buy inane shit.

After searching for the perfect razor, and killing about two smoke breaks, we would head back to the shop, freshly shorn, and in possession of all needed cleaning supplies.

Just in time to go home for the day.

FY16 VOLUNTARY ENLISTED EARLY RELEASE PROGRAM

R 132014Z JAN 15
MARADMIN 020/15
MSGID/GENADMIN/MPP//
SUBJ/FY16 VOLUNTARY ENLISTED EARLY RELEASE PROGRAM//
REF/A/MSGID:DOC/SECNAV/YMD:20120323/NOTAL//
REF/B/MSGID:MSG/CMC/171750ZDEC13//
REF/C/MSGID:DOC/CMC/YMD: 20131126//
REF/D/MSGID:MSG 2006/CMC/-//
REF/E/MSGID:DOC/MIO/YMD: 20080819//
REF/F/MSGID:DOC/N130/YMD: 20130102//
REF/G/MSGID:DOC/RFF/YMD: 20140801//
REF/H/MSGID:DOC/MRR/YMD: 20100901//
REF/I/MSGID:MSG/CMC/311723ZDEC13//
REF/J/MSGID:WEB/VA/YMD: 20140815//
NARR/REF (A) IS SECNAV APPROVAL OF VOLUNTARY ENLISTED EARLY RELEASE PROGRAM (VEERP) DATED 23 MAR 2012. REF (B) IS MARADMIN 662/13, FY15 VOLUNTARY ENLISTED EARLY RELEASE PROGRAM (VEERP). REF (C) IS MCO 1900.16, MARINE CORPS SEPARATION AND RETIREMENT MANUAL (MARCORSEPMAN). REF (D) IS PERSONNEL ADMIN ADVISORY (PAA) 06-06. REF (E) IS ONLINE MARINE CORPS TOTAL FORCE SYSTEM (MCTFS) PERSONNEL REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS USERS MANUAL. REF (F) IS OPNAVINST 1900.4, SEPARATION PAY FOR INVOLUNTARY SEPARATION FROM ACTIVE DUTY WITH CHANGE TWO. REF (G) IS DFAS 7220.31R, MCTFS AUTOMATED PAY SYSTEM MANUAL. REF (H) IS MCO 1560.25, MARINE CORPS LIFELONG LEARNING PROGRAM. REF (I) IS MARADMIN 704/13, UPDATE TO TRANSFER OF EDUCATION BENEFITS (TEB) POLICY. REF (J) IS THE MONTGOMERY GI BILL WEBSITEWWW.GIBILL.VA.GOV.//
POC/D. R. BUCK/CAPT/UNIT: CMC MMIB-1/-/TEL: DSN 278-9971//
POC/A. C. FITZGERALD/CAPT/UNIT: CMC MPP-20/-/TEL: DSN 278-9361//
GENTEXT/REMARKS/1. PURPOSE. THE FY16 VOLUNTARY ENLISTED EARLY RELEASE PROGRAM (VEERP)IS A COST SAVINGS INITIATIVE THAT WILL PERMIT SHAPING AND SUSTAINING THE FORCE WITHIN THE CONSTRAINTS OF THE APPROVED BUDGET. THE PROGRAM REMAINS FOCUSED ON COST SAVINGS FOR THE MARINE CORPS AND IS NOT AN INDIVIDUAL ENTITLEMENT PROGRAM. THIS MESSAGE SERVES TO ESTABLISH THE AUTHORITY, ELIGIBILITY, AND PROCEDURES FOR THE VOLUNTARY EARLY RELEASE OF ACTIVE DUTY ENLISTED MARINES WHOSE TERM OF SERVICE WILL EXPIRE DURING FY16 (1 OCTOBER 2015 TO 30 SEPTEMBER 2016).
2. BACKGROUND. REFERENCE (A) PROVIDES THE AUTHORITY FROM THE SECRETARY OF THE NAVY TO ESTABLISH A VOLUNTARY ENLISTED EARLY RELEASE PROGRAM. THE FY16 VEERP WILL COMMENCE UPON THE PUBLICATION OF THIS MARADMIN AND WILL RUN CONCURRENTLY WITH REF (B) FY15 VEERP. MARINES APPROVED FOR THIS PROGRAM MAY SEPARATE NO GREATER THAN 365 DAYS PRIOR TO THEIR CURRENT EXPIRATION OF ACTIVE SERVICE (EAS). MARINES APPROVED FOR THE FY16 VEERP WILL BE CONSIDERED TO HAVE COMPLETED THEIR FULL ACTIVE SERVICE COMMITMENT. THIS MARADMIN DOES NOT EXEMPT MARINES FROM COMPLETING RESERVE OR READY RESERVE OBLIGATIONS PER THEIR INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ENLISTMENT CONTRACTS.
3. ELIGIBILITY
A. ANY ACTIVE DUTY ENLISTED MARINE WITH A FY16 EAS (1 OCTOBER 2015 TO 30 SEPTEMBER 2016).
B. MARINES MAY REQUEST TO SEPARATE NO GREATER THAN 365 DAYS PRIOR TO THEIR CURRENT EAS. FY16 VEERP AUTHORIZES MARINES TO SEPARATE CROSS FY (I.E. FY16 EAS ADJUSTED TO FY15).
C. MARINES REQUESTING TO SEPARATE GREATER THAN 180 DAYS EARLY MUST HAVE AN ENDORSEMENT FROM THE FIRST GENERAL OFFICER IN THE CHAIN OF COMMAND. THE FOLLOWING EXAMPLES ILLUSTRATE DIFFERENT HYPOTHETICAL SITUATIONS:
(1) A MARINE WITH AN EXISTING EAS OF 1 AUGUST 2016 REQUESTS TO DEPART THE MARINE CORPS ON 1 SEPTEMBER 2015. SINCE THE REQUESTED EAS DATE IS GREATER THAN 180 DAYS FROM THE ORIGINAL EAS DATE, THIS REQUEST MUST HAVE AN ENDORSEMENT FROM THE FIRST GENERAL OFFICER IN THE CHAIN OF COMMAND.
(2) A MARINE WITH AN EXISTING EAS OF 31 JANUARY 2016 REQUESTS TO DEPART THE MARINE CORPS ON 15 SEPTEMBER 2015. SINCE THE REQUESTED EAS DATE IS LESS THAN 180 DAYS FROM THE ORIGINAL EAS DATE, THIS REQUEST CAN BE FORWARDED WITHOUT A GENERAL OFFICER ENDORSEMENT.
D. MARINES MUST NOT BE STABILIZED FOR DEPLOYMENT AT THE TIME OF REQUESTED EARLY RELEASE (NEW EAS). ADDITIONALLY, MARINES NOT STABILIZED BUT POSSESSING OBLIGATED SERVICE TO MEET FUTURE DEPLOYMENT DEMAND WILL BE CONSIDERED ON A CASE-BY-CASE BASIS.
E. MARINES ARE REQUIRED TO ATTEND MANDATED PRE-SEPARATION COUNSELING PER TITLE 10 USC 1142. MARINES MUST BE TRANSITION READINESS SEMINAR (TRS) COMPLETE AND MEDICALLY QUALIFIED PRIOR TO EARLY RELEASE.
F. MARINES MUST BE ELIGIBLE FOR AN HONORABLE OR GENERAL (UNDER HONORABLE CONDITION) DISCHARGE CHARACTERIZATION AT TIME OF EARLY RELEASE.
G. INDIVIDUAL REQUESTS 180 DAYS AND LESS MUST BE SUBMITTED VIA THE ADCON ENDORSING CHAIN OF COMMAND (BATTALION/SQUADRON). REQUESTS GREATER THAN 180 DAYS MUST BE SUBMITTED VIA THE ENDORSING CHAIN OF COMMAND TO INCLUDE GENERAL OFFICER ENDORSEMENT TO BE CONSIDERED ELIGIBLE.
H. MARINES CURRENTLY SERVING AS PERMANENT RESIDENT ALIENS, IN ANTICIPATION OF GAINING UNITED STATES CITIZENSHIP, MUST HAVE SERVED A MINIMUM OF THREE YEARS ACTIVE SERVICE AT THE TIME OF EARLY RELEASE.
I. MARINES WHO HAVE ONE OF THE FOLLOWING PRIMARY MOS’S ARE INELIGIBLE FOR AN EARLY RELEASE GREATER THAN 180 DAYS FROM THEIR ORIGINAL EAS UNDER THIS PROGRAM: 0211, 0231, 0241, 0321, 0372, 0651, 0689, 0842, 0861, 1171, 1391, 2111, 2141, 2147, 2621, 2631, 2651, 2671, 2673, 2676, 2831, 2847, 2874, 4133, 4612, 4821, 5512, 5524, 5821, 5948, 5954, 6042, 6112, 6116, 6152, 6154, 6156, 6172, 6173, 6174, 6176, 6213, 6217, 6218, 6257, 6258, 6276, 6283, 6287, 6288, 6313, 6317, 6322, 6326, 6333, 6337, 6338, 6386, 6492, OR 7257. THIS HEADQUARTERS RESERVES THE RIGHT TO ADJUST THE PRECEEDING LIST AS NECESSARY TO MAINTAIN MOS AND GRADE HEALTH IN RELATION TO AUTHORIZED STRENGTH REQUIREMENTS.
4. INELIGIBILITY. MARINES MEETING ANY OF THE FOLLOWING CONDITIONS ARE INELIGIBLE TO PARTICIPATE IN THE FY16 VOLUNTARY ENLISTED EARLY RELEASE PROGRAM:
A. MARINES WHO DO NOT HAVE A FY16 EAS (1 OCTOBER 2015 TO 30 SEPTEMBER 2016)
B. MARINES SCHEDULED FOR TRANSFER TO THE FMCR OR RETIRED LIST.
C. MARINES WHO ARE INDEBTED TO THE GOVERNMENT (TO INCLUDE ADVANCE AND EXCESS LEAVE). INDEBTED MARINES DESIRING EARLY SEPARATION CAN MAKE ACCELERATED REPAYMENT OF THEIR DEBTS BY INCREASING SCHEDULED INSTALLMENT AMOUNTS AND BY MAKING CASH COLLECTIONS TO REPAY THEIR INDEBTEDNESS. INDEBTEDNESS MUST BE ENTIRELY RESOLVED PRIOR TO EARLY RELEASE.
D. MARINES BEING RELEASED UNDER OTHER HQMC DIRECTED EARLY OUT PROGRAMS, E.G., EARLY RELEASE FOR EDUCATION, TEMPORARY EARLY RETIREMENT AUTHORITY, VOLUNTARY SEPARATION PAY PROGRAM.
E. MARINES PARTICIPATING IN THE NATIONAL CALL TO SERVICE PROGRAM.
F. MARINES CURRENTLY ON TERMINAL LEAVE AWAY FROM THE PERMANENT DUTY STATION (PDS) PENDING SEPARATION.
G. MARINES WHO MANIFEST SYMPTOMS OF POST TRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER/TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY AND ARE UNDERGOING POST DEPLOYMENT HEALTH EVALUATION AND MANAGEMENT CARE WILL NOT BE SEPARATED UNDER THIS AUTHORITY UNTIL THAT PROCESS IS COMPLETE OR A WAIVER OF TREATMENT EVALUATION HAS BEEN EXECUTED.
H. MARINES PENDING LEGAL ACTION OR PROCEEDINGS, ADMINISTRATIVE SEPARATION, OR DISABILITY SEPARATION OR RETIREMENT ARE NOT ELIGIBLE FOR THE VEERP. THE MARINE MAY SUBMIT FOR VEERP ONCE PROCEEDINGS ARE COMPLETED AND IF HE/SHE REMAINS ELIGIBLE FOR RELEASE UNDER HONORABLE CONDITIONS. THE VEERP SHOULD NOT BE VIEWED AS AN EXPEDITIOUS MANNER TO SEPARATE MARINES WHO FALL INTO A CATEGORY WHICH REQUIRES MANDATORY PROCESSING FOR ADMINISTRATIVE SEPARATION PER REFERENCE (C).
5. PROGRAM TIMELINE
A. APPLICATION PROCESSING WILL COMMENCE IMMEDIATELY UPON RELEASE OF THIS MARADMIN. MARINES REQUESTING A NEW CROSS FISCAL YEAR SEPARATION DATE FROM FY16 TO FY15 MUST SUBMIT THEIR VEERP REQUEST IN ENOUGH TIME TO REACH THIS HQ (MMIB) NO LATER THAN 120 DAYS PRIOR TO THE NEW REQUESTED EAS DATE. MARINES REQUESTING NON-CROSS FISCAL YEAR SEPARATION DATES WILL SUBMIT THEIR REQUESTS IN ENOUGH TIME TO REACH THIS HQ 60 DAYS PRIOR TO THE NEW EAS REQUESTED DATE. VEERP PROCESSING EXAMPLES ARE PROVIDED BELOW:
(1) CROSS YEAR VEERP (UP TO 365 DAYS): A MARINE WITH AN EXISTING EAS OF 31 AUGUST 2016 REQUESTS TO DEPART THE MARINE CORPS ON 31 AUGUST 2015. SINCE THE EAS DATE CROSSES FISCAL YEARS, THIS REQUEST MUST REACH HQMC (MMIB) NO LATER THAN 2 MAY 2015.
(2) CROSS YEAR VEERP (LESS THAN 180 DAYS): A MARINE WITH AN EXISTING EAS OF 31 OCTOBER 2015 REQUESTS TO DEPART THE MARINE CORPS ON 31 JULY 2015. SINCE THE REQUESTED EAS DATE CROSSES FISCAL YEARS, THIS REQUEST MUST REACH HQMC (MMIB) NO LATER THAN 1 APRIL 2015.
(3) NON-CROSS YEAR VEERP: A MARINE WITH AN EXISTING EAS OF 31 JULY 2015 REQUESTS TO DEPART THE MARINE CORPS ON 31 MAY 2015. SINCE THE REQUESTED EAS DATE DOES NOT CROSS FISCAL YEARS, THIS REQUEST MUST REACH HQMC (MMIB) NO LATER THAN 31 MARCH 2015.
B. ADDITIONALLY, THE MARINE MUST MEET ALL ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA OUTLINED IN PARAGRAPH 3 OF THIS MARADMIN PRIOR TO EARLY RELEASE. UPON EARLY RELEASE, THE MARINE WILL BE CONSIDERED TO HAVE COMPLETED HIS/HER FULL ACTIVE SERVICE COMMITMENT. COMMANDERS ARE ENCOURAGED TO MAXIMIZE THE USE OF THIS CROSS FISCAL YEAR PROGRAM IN ORDER TO MAXIMIZE BUDGETARY SAVINGS AND FAVORABLY IMPACT MARINE CORPS ENDSTRENGTH GOALS.
6. COORDINATING INSTRUCTIONS
A. HQMC (MP) MAINTAINS ALL POLICY ASSOCIATED WITH THIS PROGRAM.
B. HQMC (MM) MAINTAINS FINAL APPROVAL AUTHORITY FOR ALL REQUESTS.
C. INDIVIDUAL MARINES MUST SUBMIT REQUESTS BY AA FORM VIA THEIR ADCON CHAIN OFCOMMAND TO CMC (MMIB-1).
D. IT IS UNDERSTOOD THAT FULL PARTICIPATION IN THIS PROGRAM MAY RESULT IN SOME UNITS ACCEPTING TEMPORARY RISK BY FALLING BELOW HISTORICAL STAFFING LEVELS AS OUTLINED IN PREVIOUS VEERP MESSAGES. COMMANDERS’ SUPPORT OF THIS FORCE SHAPING TOOL IS CRITICAL FOR THE MARINE CORPS TO ATTAIN ITS DRAWDOWN GOAL.
E. SUBMIT ALL VEERP PACKAGES TO THIS HQ (MMIB) FOR PROPER ADJUDICATION VIA OUTLOOK TO SMB.MANPOWER.MMIB1(AT)USMC.MIL USING THE FORMAT AND ATTACHMENT FOUND ON THE MMIB-1 DISTRIBUTION/MODELS/SYSTEMS SUPPORT/REQUIREMENTS DEVELOPMENT SECTION WEBSITE.
(1) EARLY RELEASE REQUESTS 180 DAYS OR LESS FROM AN INDIVIDUAL’S EXISTING EAS MUST BE SUBMITTED VIA THE ADCON ENDORSING CHAIN OF COMMAND (BATTALION/SQUADRON).
(2) EARLY RELEASE REQUESTS GREATER THAN 180 DAYS FROM AN INDIVIDUAL’S EXISTING EAS WILL BE SUBMITTED VIA THE ADCON CHAIN OF COMMAND AND ENDORSED BY THE FIRST GENERAL OFFICER.
(3) WITHOUT THE REQUIRED ATTACHMENTS AND ACCURATE ELECTRONIC DATA INTERCHANGE PERSONAL IDENTIFIER (EDIPI), REQUESTS WILL NOT BE PROCESSED. USE PROCEDURES FROM REF (D) TO TRANSMIT MARINES’ PERSONAL DATA. THE REQUIRED SPREADSHEET ATTACHMENT CAN BE FOUND ON THE MMIB-1 WEBSITE IN THE DISTRIBUTION/MODELS/SYSTEMS SUPPORT/REQUIREMENTS DEVELOPMENT SECTION AFTER LOG-IN TO THE MANPOWER AND RESERVE AFFAIRS PORTAL. CONTACT THE HQMC (MM) POC WITH SUBMISSIONS QUESTIONS TO ENSURE ACCURACY IN SUBMISSION PROCEDURES.
(4) COMMANDERS WILL RECOMMEND APPROVAL OF THE SPECIFIC DATE FOR SEPARATION ON THE SPREADSHEET WHEN ENDORSING A MARINE’S REQUEST FOR EARLY RELEASE. COMMANDERS ARE ADVISED THAT VACANCIES OCCURRING FROM MARINES APPROVED FOR VEERP WILL BE FILLED AS SOON AS PRACTICABLE BASED UPON PRIORITIZED REQUIREMENTS. TERMINAL LEAVE IS AUTHORIZED AT COMMANDERS’ DISCRETION UPON APPROVAL OF THE VEERP BY HQMC.
(5) COMMANDERS WILL PROVIDE SPECIFIC JUSTIFICATION FOR INDIVIDUAL MARINES NOT RECOMMENDED FOR APPROVAL TO PARTICIPATE IN THE PROGRAM. COMMANDERS UTILIZING STABILIZATION FOR DEPLOYMENT AS JUSTIFICATION MUST ENSURE THAT MARINES HAVE BEEN REPORTED TO MMEA FOR PROPER STABILIZATION AND DCC REPORTING. FOR DEPLOYMENT PLANNING PURPOSES, MARINES DEPLOYING IN SUPPORT OF A MEU REQUIRE 15 MONTHS REMAINING ON CONTRACT WHILE UDP DEPLOYMENTS REQUIRE 12 MONTHS REMAINING ON CONTRACT. FAILURE TO PROVIDE SPECIFIC RECOMMENDATIONS DOES NOT ALLOW THIS HQ TO MAKE INFORMED DECISIONS.
F. HQMC (MM) RESERVES THE AUTHORITY TO APPROVE/DISAPPROVE/RESTRICT THE TOTAL NUMBER OF EARLY RELEASE DAYS TO MEET THE NEEDS OF THE MARINE CORPS. MARINES OVERSEAS AND IN SOME PRIMARY MILITARY OCCUPATIONAL SPECIALTIES MAY BE RELEASED AT LESS THAN REQUESTED RELEASE AND/OR COMMANDER RECOMMENDED DATES. UPON HQMC (MM) FINAL APPROVAL, MMIB WILL REPORT THE NEW EAS/ECC VIA MCTFS UNIT DIARY ENTRY PER REF (E). COMMANDERS WILL BE NOTIFIED OF VEERP APPROVAL VIA DIARY FEEDBACK REPORT WITH HISTORY STATEMENT INDICATING APPROVAL FOR VEERP. IN THE CASE OF VEERP DISAPPROVAL, HQMC (MM) WILL REPORT A DISCHARGE DISAPPROVED ENTRY VIA UNIT DIARY.
G. MARINES BEING SEPARATED UNDER VEERP WILL SIGN A PAGE 11 ENTRY FOR INCLUSION IN THEIR OFFICIAL MILITARY PERSONNEL FILE ACKNOWLEDGING THAT THEY ARE A VOLUNTEER FOR THE PROGRAM AND THAT SEPARATION REQUIREMENTS WILL BE COMPLETED PRIOR TO EAS. EXAMPLE PAGE 11 ENTRY: I HAVE BEEN APPROVED FOR PARTICIPATION IN THE FY16 VOLUNTARY ENLISTED EARLY RELEASE PROGRAM. I UNDERSTAND THAT MY NEW EAS IS (YYYY/MM/DD). I HAVE BEEN COUNSELED ON THE CONTENTS OF THE FY16 VOLUNTARY ENLISTED EARLY RELEASE PROGRAM MARADMIN AND UNDERSTAND THAT I WILL BE CONSIDERED TO HAVE COMPLETED MY FULL ACTIVE SERVICE COMMITMENT. I UNDERSTAND THAT I AM REQUIRED TO COMPLETE ANY REMAINING RESERVE OR READY RESERVE OBLIGATIONS PER MY INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ENLISTMENT CONTRACT. ADDITIONALLY, I UNDERSTAND THAT PRE-SEPARATION COUNSELING, TRS AND MEDICAL SCREENING FOR SEPARATION MUST BE COMPLETE PRIOR TO MY NEW EAS.
H. UNIT DIARY ENTRIES REPORTING RELEASE FROM ACTIVE DUTY OR DISCHARGE WILL BE SUBMITTED PER REF (E).
(1) THE SEPARATION PROGRAM DESIGNATOR CODE (SPD) FOR ACTIVE DUTY ENLISTED MARINES BEING RELEASED FROM ACTIVE DUTY IS MCC1, REDUCTION IN FORCE. THIS SPD APPLIES TO MARINES THAT HAVE REMAINING OBLIGATED SERVICE OR WISH TO TRANSFER TO THE RESERVES. REF (C), PARAGRAPH 6404.3 PROVIDES THE AUTHORITY FOR THIS SPD.
(2) THE SPD FOR ACTIVE DUTY ENLISTED MARINES BEING DISCHARGED FROM ACTIVE DUTY IS KCC1, REDUCTION IN FORCE. THIS SPD APPLIES TO MARINES WHO HAVE COMPLETED EIGHT YEARS ACTIVE DUTY OBLIGATED SERVICE AND DO NOT WISH TO TRANSFER TO THE RESERVES. REF (C), PARAGRAPH 6404.3 PROVIDES THE AUTHORITY FOR THIS SPD.
(3) MARINES ALREADY DENIED FURTHER SERVICE WILL RETAIN THE APPROPRIATE SPD CODE AND MUST SUBMIT FOR SEPARATIONS PAY DETERMINATION PER REFS (C) AND (F). RELEASE OF REGULAR ACTIVE ENLISTED MARINES WITH MILITARY SERVICE OBLIGATIONS FROM ACTIVE DUTY WILL BE AFFECTED IN ACCORDANCE WITH REF (C).
I. IT IS IMPERATIVE THAT COMMANDS NOTIFY THEIR DISBURSING OFFICERS/FINANCE OFFICERS (DO/FO) REGARDING EARLY SEPARATIONS IN ACCORDANCE WITH REFERENCE (G).
J. MARINES WISHING TO WITHDRAW FROM PARTICIPATION IN VEERP FOLLOWING APPROVAL SHOULD SUBMIT CORRESPONDENCE VIA THE MMIB-1 SMB ACCOUNT, SMB.MANPOWER.MMIB(AT)USMC.MIL, REQUESTING THAT THEIR VEERP REQUEST BE CANCELLED. MARINES WISHING TO REQUEST A LONGER VEERP PERIOD THAN ALREADY APPROVED SHOULD FIRST REQUEST THEIR ORIGINAL APPROVAL BE CANCELLED AND SUBMIT A NEW PACKAGE FOR THE FULL DESIRED PERIOD.
K. IN ANY CASE WHERE A MARINE PREVIOUSLY APPROVED FOR THE VEERP IS CHARGED WITH ANY OFFENSE WHICH REQUIRES MANDATORY PROCESSING FOR ADMINISTRATIVE SEPARATION PER THE MARCORSEPMAN, CONTACT MMIB-1 IMMEDIATELY TO HAVE THE VEERP CANCELLED.
L. IF A MARINE PREVIOUSLY APPROVED FOR THE VEERP IS FOUND TO BE NOT MEDICALLY QUALIFIED TO SEPARATE AT THEIR ADJUSTED EAS, NOTIFY MMIB-1 IMMEDIATELY TO HAVE THE VEERP DATE EITHER MODIFIED OR CANCELLED.
7. RESERVE COMPONENT OPPORTUNITY. THE SELECTED MARINE CORPS RESERVE IS ACTIVELY SEEKING THE SERVICE OF SEPARATING MARINES WHO WANT TO REMAIN AFFILIATED WITH THE MARINE CORPS UPON TRANSITION FROM THE ACTIVE COMPONENT. OPPORTUNITIES EXIST FOR ADVANCED OR ADDITIONAL MOS TRAINING. DEPENDING ON MOS AND BILLET AVAILABILITY, AFFILIATION BONUSES MAY BE AVAILABLE FOR TRANSITIONING MARINES. INTERESTED MARINES MAY JOIN A UNIT BY APPLYING FOR THE DIRECT AFFILIATION PROGRAM (MARADMIN 419/13) OR REQUEST ADDITIONAL INFORMATION BY CONTACTING YOUR CAREER PLANNER OR A RESERVE TRANSITION COORDINATOR (RTC). TO CONTACT AN RTC, EMAIL SMB_DIRECT_AFFILIATION_PROGRAM (AT) USMC.MIL OR SELECT THE NEAREST POC FROM THE LIST BELOW:
A. MCAS CHERRY POINT, MCB CAMP LEJEUNE, MCAS BEAUFORT, AND MCRD PARRIS ISLAND: SSGT CECILIA GONZALEZ AND SSGT BOBBY KYLES AT COM: (910) 450-6291/6537.
B. MCB CAMP PENDLETON, MCAS MIRAMAR, AND MCRD SAN DIEGO: GYSGT ROBERT MARCHAND AT COM: (760) 763-3426.
C. OKINAWA AND MCAS IWAKUNI: SSGT BRIAN JOSEPH AT (011) 81-611-722-6004.
D. NATIONAL CAPITAL REGION, MCB QUANTICO: MSGT PATRICK FOREMAN AT COM: (703) 784-9143/4.
8. GENERAL INFORMATION
A. IN THE EVENT OF FUTURE RECALL, MARINES RELEASED UNDER THIS MARADMIN WILL BE CONSIDERED AS BEING IN THE SAME STATUS AS THOSE WHO HAVE COMPLETED THEIR OBLIGATED PERIOD OF ACTIVE DUTY.
B. ENLISTED MARINES SEPARATED UNDER AUTHORITY OF THIS MARADMIN MAY BE AWARDED THE GOOD CONDUCT MEDAL IF THEIR ADJUSTED EAS FALLS WITHIN 90 DAYS OF THEIR 3 YEAR GOOD CONDUCT MEDAL ANNIVERSARY DATE.
C. MARINES WHO ARE ENTITLED TO SEPARATION PAY UPON NORMAL EAS, WHO ELECT AND ARE APPROVED FOR EARLY RELEASE FROM ACTIVE DUTY UNDER THIS MARADMIN, WILL RETAIN THEIR ENTITLEMENT TO SEPARATION PAY PROVIDED THEY HAVE COMPLETED SIX YEARS OF ACTIVE SERVICE PRIOR TO THE DAY OF EARLY RELEASE (NEW EAS) FROM ACTIVE DUTY. MARINES ARE REMINDED THAT EARLY RELEASE FROM ACTIVE DUTY UNDER THIS MARADMIN COULD AFFECT THE AMOUNT OF THEIR SEPARATION PAY. REFERENCES (C) AND (F) PRESCRIBE THE METHOD OF COMPUTING SEPARATION PAY. FURTHERMORE, IF EARLY RELEASE WOULD DISQUALIFY MARINES FOR SEPARATION PAY DUE TO LENGTH OF SERVICE CRITERIA UNDER THE LAW, MARINES WILL NOT BE RELEASED FROM ACTIVE DUTY UNTIL THEIR SERVICE LENGTH CRITERIA HAS BEEN MET.
D. MARINES WHO ARE ENTITLED TO SEPARATION PAY UPON NORMAL EAS MUST SUBMIT FOR EARLY RELEASE VIA A SEPARATIONS PAY DETERMINATION REQUEST IN THE TOTAL FORCE RETENTION SYSTEM (TFRS). ALL EARLY RELEASE REQUESTS FOR 180 DAYS OR GREATER WILL BE SUBMITTED WITH AN ENDORSEMENT FROM THE FIRST GENERAL OFFICER IN CHAIN OF COMMAND.
E. MARINES ENTITLED TO SEPARATION BENEFITS ARE AUTHORIZED THOSE BENEFITS IF RELEASED UNDER THIS MARADMIN. AS A REMINDER, ELIGIBLE MARINES AND THEIR FAMILY MEMBERS DESIRING TO RETAIN TRICARE PRIME UPON SEPARATION ARE REQUIRED TO REENROLL IN TRICARE.
F. MARINES ARE REMINDED TO REVIEW REFERENCES (H) THROUGH (J) FOR ELIGIBILITY AND OTHER MISCELLANEOUS REQUIREMENTS RELATED TO EDUCATIONAL BENEFIT PROGRAMS PRIOR TO PARTICIPATING IN VEERP. PER REFERENCE (I), MARINES WHO WERE PREVIOUSLY APPROVED TO TRANSFER POST 9/11 GI BILL BENEFITS ARE ELIGIBLE FOR VEERP WITH NO EFFECT ON TRANSFERRED BENEFITS; THEY ARE CONSIDERED TO HAVE COMPLETED THEIR ADDITIONAL OBLIGATED SERVICE REQUIREMENTS ASSOCIATED WITH THE TRANSFER OF POST 9/11 GI BILL BENEFITS. THIS WAIVER OF OBLIGATED SERVICE FOR POST 9/11 GI BILL BENEFITS TRANSFER IS ONLY APPLICABLE TO FORCE SHAPING MEASURES.
G. ENLISTMENT BONUSES OR SELECTIVE REENLISTMENT BONUSES WILL NOT BE RECOUPED FROM MARINES SEPARATED UNDER THE AUTHORITY OF THIS MARADMIN AS IT IS A FORCE SHAPING MEASURE.
9. RESERVE APPLICABILITY. THIS MARADMIN IS NOT APPLICABLE TO THE MARINE CORPS RESERVE.
10. THIS MARADMIN CANCELS ON 30 SEP 2016.
11. RELEASE AUTHORIZED BY MRS. S. E. MURRAY, ACTING DEPUTY COMMANDANT FOR MANPOWER AND RESERVE AFFAIRS.//

The Ballad of QA (part II, the Sergeant Strikes Back)

After finding out that QA had been wrong, and watching him eat his liver as all the equipment moved back into the building where it was required to be (I will admit I might have enjoyed it a bit more than was entirely healthy) the time came for him to unleash what he considered to be the sound and the fury.

The weapons in his arsenal of vicious justice included such hits as ‘paint new lines in the parking lot’ and ‘clean graffiti off of buildings’.

Unfortunately for him, both the lines and the buildings were new. The lines were still shiny and yellow, and the brick hadn’t even begun to fade, leaving QA with no leadership strategies available to him. One day the muse was upon him: everybody has that container filled with sand that is used for cigarette butts. In most cases it is an ammo can, or some similarly sized container.

In this case, with hundreds of people, the container was an oil drum. With this much sand to spare, people (myself included) would simply push their cigarette butts under the sand, and go about their day. QA simply knew that there must be hundreds if not thousands of butts under the sand in dire need of removal, since we all know that un-sorted cigarette butts represent the collapse of western civilization.

QA announced Friday after lunch that the entire shop would not leave until I had sorted every single cigarette butt from that oil drum. Plainly counting on the mob justice that the Moron Corpse is built on to ‘yank me back into line’, I asked him in front of two SSgts and the Gunny if that meant that everyone could leave, if and only if I finished the drum. He pointed out that I also had other tasks to accomplish, but agreed.

He plainly did not consider the implications of this statement, and returned from a 90 minute cigarette break at his place in base housing to find the shop empty, apart from me, the two SSgts and Gunny. He angrily demanded an explanation, and Gunny happily filled him in that I had knocked the drum over, raked the cigarette butts out, and blew the sand back into the oil drum with a leaf blower.

This would be more than QA could bear. He had lost his fight to keep the building shiny, had lost his appointment as HAZMAT NCO (which had been used for disappearing from work more than anything else) nearly been disciplined for blatantly violating regulations and orders, and had just been publicly humiliated by someone smarter than him. (In QA’s case, this was not hard. I consider it akin to being the finest opera singer in El Paso.)

QA had watched his superiors systematically abuse their ranks in his previous MOS, and was upset for three reasons:

First, there were many more sergeants in the air wing, and he wasn’t as scary as he thought he would be.

Second, all of the procedures he thought he knew no longer applied. There were many things that were done differently in naval aviation than in motor transport (tool control, FOD, etc.) and he just couldn’t get it.

Third, and perhaps most importantly, he couldn’t see everything from the door of the van that he had decided was his office. This meant he actually had to get off his ass to chew people out.

He had attempted to wreck shop when he arrived, until he found out that 3 of the other sergeants were senior to him, and didn’t want anything to do with his reckless asshattery.

Soon enough (by waiting around, because that’s what makes good leaders), I picked up sergeant, and he about lost it. There was no way that someone who wouldn’t suck E5 cock first thing every morning was worthy to be one.

His attempts to ‘get me back’ ranged from the futile:

1) I was charged as UA for having left a safety stand down. His evidence was that he had seen me at the PX. If he had been attending the safety stand down as I was, how did he not know that it was chow time?

2) I was charged with conduct unbecoming for tossing bread under the vans to feed our resident rabbit, who the ladies had named ‘Corporal Fluffernutter’.

3) I was dragged before the Equal Opportunity Officer because my bald head. I was tired of paying $10 twice a week to maintain a haircut, because for some strange reason my hair started growing in two different colors. (I am told this is not uncommon, and I grew out of it. It was a pain in the ass to maintain to jarhead standards, so I shaved it)
Couple this with a maween regulation mustache and it’s almost impossible not to look like a nazi. As I mentioned QA was black, and this therefore constituted an attack against his race.

To the laughable:

1) He made a remark that was actually something resembling clever. When referring to a corporal, he said ‘He had better be like EF Hutton, when he speaks, you listen’.

Someone asked who EF Hutton was. His reply was that EF Hutton was an American cavalry officer in WWI, and his advice was so good that it was always listened to.

After a moment, having determined that this guy was actually serious, all the marines who remembered the EF Hutton TV commercials collectively roared with laughter as they realized how full of shit this guy was.

I was accused the next morning of having orchestrated that ahead of time, and having made him believe something that wasn’t true.

Again I was selected to clean the butts from the cigarette can, and specifically told this time that I could not tip the sand out of it, because it represented a FOD hazard, and we were no longer allowed to use leaf blowers anyway.

This time, I grabbed an engine hoist, and lifted the can on top of a 200kw generator, which was due a load bank test. I dropped the load on to the generator and, as the engine worked to handle the strain, the butts worked their way to the top of the can, where they were scooped into a bag and disposed of.

Apparently this constituted failure to obey a lawful order. As far as he could remember, I had been told to go through it by hand, individually picking out each butt. Nobody but him could remember this order, but that did not stop him.

Before the day was out, the charge sheet was on its way.

Submitted by: Billiam201

Rants of a Boot Marine Part II: Life in the Fleet

I remember just last Friday, I was hanging out with a female Corporal (time for everyone to scream FRATERNIZATION!!!!!!!) before a working party to stash away Christmas trees after a Santa comes to the hangar event for the sons/daughters of Marines in our unit in Miramar.

ADD NOTE: While like every Marine who hates working parties like the ones where you’re forced to police call and the whatnot, these are the rare few where you could skate, and might have fun. The Christmas Santa working party had us dress up as Olaf, Santa, and his elves, load up a “sleigh” into a C-130, and taxi to a hangar full of kids eager to meet Santa and that Frozen character of a Snowman.

She was one of the cool NCOs, not caring about me saying Corporal every other sentence, talking about her own personal BS experience, and what I could possibly do to deal with it for the next 3 years.

I should’ve asked her if she actually liked being a Marine or not. Considering that she was a female and of a higher ranking than me, she’d probably would’ve said yes, not having to deal with the same BS that I was dealing with.

But aside from witnessing the double standard on a daily basis, I’ve seen firsthand how this isn’t the Few and the Proud the Marines were advertising like they keep saying.

More Marines are applying for VEERP packages in my unit than there are Marines that are looking into retirement.

The subtle difference is that while not all Marines have the same reason. A majority of the VEERP Marines know what they were doing post Marine Corps and couldn’t wait to do so. The retiring ones were worrying about what they should do, contemplating of the careers they could’ve done 15-20 years before.

We’ve been set up by an illusion that if we did our time, kissed asses, and stay in longer, we’d have a nice pension, much respect, and have it easy.

It’s a complete. Freaking. Lie.

None of the MCI’s, MarineNet courses, or things that I’ve been voluntold to have relevance to me. I don’t even think that MarineNet course on CyberAwareness even helped one bit, more Marines violate what they teach than those who actually apply what they learned.

I’ve seen NCO’s/SNCO’s/Officers that couldn’t tell the difference between “You’re” and “Your”, fat nasties telling us how to get higher PFT/CFT scores, fall the hell out of simple moto runs like the Marine Corps Birthday run. AND IT’S NOT EVEN THAT HARD!!!!!!

Further more, while I don’t really live in the world of daily games of many individuals in the Marines regardless of the whole POG/Grunt thing, it seems to be seeping into my life now with this Dike of a Sergeant who thinks she’s the grunt of the IPAC, reigning in on my Corporal (not the female one, but a different one who I also consider pretty chill), and my fellow Marines of the same rank, somehow thinking we’ve lost the way of the Marine Corps.

You may ask, “What way?”

I don’t know? Where we have to stand at parade rest when talking to a superior? Where we have to call people by their rank every other sentence? Knowing how to call cadence/drill?

She has yet to realize that being in an Airwing unit rank sometimes doesn’t matter when you have to trust another Marine not by their rank, but by their  experience and individuality in an effort to survive. Not by how they can’t to keep their thumbs along the trouser seams, how their voice can’t match the cadence they call, or if they simply don’t want to do MCI’s/MarineNet courses altogether like me, it’s not the ending of the freaking world.

Other than this, it quite infuriates me how I sometimes have to type up awards for Marines that do their jobs. I think one of my friends even typed up a NAM for a Sergeant that was simply a part of the Base Color Guard for one day.

I honestly don’t have a problem typing up awards for Marines who actually go above and beyond the “Call of Duty” like rescuing a seriously injured biker off the highway and driving him to the hospital.

But every stroke of the key seems to make me want to hurl the keyboard at the monitor when I have to type up an award that goes along the lines of:

“Sgt. Prickhead performed at his best level through aggressive leadership (douchebaggery) by counting all the refueling cells within 24 hours”

or

“Sgt NJP stood there respectfully with the Colors with the best representation, raising it at precisely  0730…..”

You probably think I’m joking, but these are real citations that I have seen in the S-1.

This BS really makes me want to get FAPed out to do something else. I can’t stand it anymore. Send me to the pool to help the Water Survival Instructors for a year and I won’t have a problem with it. Or make me a coach at the range. I’m an okay shooter, but know how to get others to shoot better than me! Let me play Haji at Pendleton, where I don’t have to worry about some douche of a SNCO tell me to shave, and I can mess around with grunts who think that they’re Gods.

Guys, are you having the same thoughts on a daily basis? Do you wish you are already out when you’re a year into your 4 year contract? Or wishing you were reassigned somewhere else?

Have a good Christmas and more to come!

Hazing doesn’t build character, it breaks and warps you into something nasty

Go to your local pound. See the dogs that have been beaten? See how they’re a combination of scared shitless and willing to tear your throat out if you look at them wrong? Do you think they’re better dogs because they were treated like that? Just like there are better ways to train dogs, there are better ways to train men. The best way is to realize that men are men, and should be treated as such. They signed away years of their lives just like you did, and now they’re willing and eager to become the best of the best. But all too often, that’s not what happens.

It’s one thing to imagine the Jarhead hazing scene, where they pretend to brand him, and then that’s that. It’s something else entirely to live it, to come to the realization that you signed away four years of your life for this, and that there’s nothing you can do about it. It doesn’t stop, it goes on day after day after day after fucking day, and then it keeps going. This isn’t a movie, or a video game, and you don’t have the option to say it’s over unless you want to have a felony following you around for the rest of your life. It usually doesn’t have a purpose other than to entertain or make the guy who’s doing it feel better about themselves or their situation in life. It’s almost always done to you by those you though you’d respect, and who turn out to be utter shit bags. It doesn’t build character, it breaks and warps it into something nasty. It doesn’t build men any more than it builds combat effectiveness, and least of all maturity.

RSP is the most depressing place to be at.

Rsp is the most depressing place to be at. I was there for about 16 days. Being the fact that i was dropped on training day 30 , it made it worse. I walked into Rsp and realized that over 90% of the drops were from receiving weeks. This was so crazy to think that people didnt make it out of receiving week, i felt so lucky to have made it as far as i did. In Rsp you meet two kinds of people those who quit and those who didnt. Many get there and decide that they dont wanna do it anymore but then theres those like me who would do anything to get back to training with my platoon.

Every day you wake up and not know when you are going home. This feeling is literally the worst feeling. Every day unless it was sunday we would go to working parties. Which generally let me see The island from a different point of view. I was the one who gave clothing to the receiving recruits of that week. It was so different than what you see when you are the one in receiving. But besides working , we would sit on our footlockers and wait the day out. I would count the hours left until lights out and then the next day do it all over again. But if you were like me you would be tired each day from 2 hours of fire watch every day until i left, all because of falling asleep during firewatch, even though everyone did it. Fire watch in rsp was basically a joke because of the fact that we get loced in at night with alarms so there was no need for us.

One of the worst feelings was being made fun of by other platoons and or Drill Instructors. Being from 2nd phase were generally you get yelled at when you fuck up and not for random reasons like in 1st phase it made me feel so bad about myself. Generally all the Drill Instructors label Rsp all as quitters. But the only good thing about it all was the friends i made there. We were all going through the same thing so it was easier to get along. These are friends that will last a lifetime.

Submitted by: Vfore

The Ballad of QA (not quality assurance)

Sgt QA checked in to my shop in 1999 (maybe late 1998, I confess the memory is fuzzy), shortly after we pulled off moving enormous amounts of equipment, and reassembling an entire logistics squadron due to the closure of another base. He checked in at his shop, they took one look at him, decided he was too dumb to hit things with wrenches, and promptly FAPped him out to us.

(This was hardly uncommon. There was no MOS for my shop. It was composed entirely of FAPs.)

He was upset by this, and decided to take it out on as many junior marines as possible, as painfully as possible. We had just moved into beautiful new facilities, which he decided were too nice to actually use, so he ordered all the gear be moved outside to be worked on.

The Gunny quickly figured out that this guy was too dumb for his own good, so he gave him the duties of the HAZMAT NCO.

A 55 gallon drum couldn’t be stored outside at the time, unless it was contained In a permanent spill area. (Rainwater could wash material off the drums, and contaminate groundwater.) Since we didn’t have one, the drums had to go inside. These were unsightly, and took up space in his precious building, so he decided we no longer needed 55-gallon oil drums in the shop. We could use 1-quart jugs for oil changes, like every jiffy lube on the planet.

In case anyone has ever wondered how much oil it takes to do a complete oil and filter change on a 1450 cubic inch diesel, the amount is just over nine gallons.

That’s right, he decided that, rather than pulling a generator up next to an oil drum, pumping 9 gallons of oil into it, wiping it down, and going on our merry way, it was better to fabricate outdoor drip pans (the airframes department wasn’t happy about this), go to base hazmat every time we needed to change oil, get 3 cases of oil, pour them into the various places they needed to be, cap them and take them to be disposed of.

When, after a month of this, I pointed out that productivity was down, our RFI was down (inhibiting our ability to support training operations, much less a war) and costs were up (since we were buying 30-50 cases of quart bottles of oil a month, instead of a pair of 55-gallon drums, I was informed that I hated this idea because QA was black.

That’s right. I didn’t hate his idiotic idea because it was stupid, wasteful, and motivated entirely by a desire to ‘put his name on something’.

I hated his idiotic idea because of the race of the idiot in question.

He was a sergeant, and I was a corporal, which automatically made all his ideas good ones. Therefore, I couldn’t possibly have a legitimate military reason for disagreeing with him. It had to be personal, as he would be more than happy to tell anyone who would ask.

Abandoning million-dollar facilities for fear of getting dirt in them was perfectly logical, as far as he was concerned. What if a general comes to inspect? How much easier will our lives be without having to clean that building? We just move all the equipment in to it, so it looks like we use it, and we come out of it smelling like a rose!

Except for one thing:

There was exactly one person in that shop who actually had a California NREA certification. (I think the name of this certificate has changed since)

Would any of our gentle readers like guess who that person was?

That’s right.

It was the guy that hated Sgt. QAs ideas because he was black.

It had nothing to do with the fact that the exhaust reclamation system was inside the building, or that our shop wasn’t licensed to dispense large quantities (over 5 quarts per engine) of oil from bottles.

Fortunately for me, Sgt. QA had been appointed hazmat NCO in violation of California law (a fact of which they had already been informed) leaving the squadron to pay those bills.

Fear not, gentle reader:

I would pay dearly for the crime of being right.

Submitted by: Billiam201

How did you hear of iHateTheUSMC?

It was a question I asked on the front page of iHateTheUSMC.com. We recently hit our 4 year anniversary as a website and I thought it would be a cool to see how people found us and what their first impression was. I got some interesting responses!

Ohreally:

“As a poolie, I found this site while googling information about boot camp. When I saw the truth about the Marine Corpse presented here, my cognitive dissonance activated and I told myself that these people were just shitbags and your typical anti-american, anti-government crazy types who probably hated the Corpse, because they thought it was part of some illuminati conspiracy. I proceeded on the Corpse anyway.

How.
Wrong.
Was.
I.”

Me:

“Did anyone tell you that you will be back on the site after bootcamp? Did anyone tell you “I told you so”?

We have had a lot of poolies do the same as you and we always told them “you will be back”. Are you one of them?”

Ohreally:

“I actually never commented and told anybody they were shitbags. I do have a vague recollection of skimming through the “how to get out of bootcamp/mct/soi” article and laughing at the idea of somebody actually telling their Drill Instructors to “YELL LOUDER, I LIKE IT” or something akin to that. I was still in the Full Metal Jacket belief about boot camp you see; I expected some poor kid to try to test their Drill Instructors and get knocked out or something by a R Lee Ermy clone. Then I actually go and it turns out that all the shitbags graduate anyway. Nice….. This website actually had much greater use for me at SOI-W. By about the end of the first week of ITB, I started to ask in the deep recesses of my mind why all the combat instructors still treated us like we were recruits, manual laborers, servants, and janitors. Weren’t we told in Marine Week, and really ALL OF BOOT CAMP, that these fuck fuck games were going to end by the time we “earned” our Eagle, Globe, Anchor? Was this not one of the main, if not *the* main motivation guiding us as we waded through all the bullshit? That somehow, somewhere, there was going to be a light at the end of the tunnel, and we would rate as human beings, let alone as exalted MARINES? When I had these thoughts I began to think that perhaps there was something seriously psychologically wrong with me, hadn’t I had wanted this for so bad, for so long? Did I not actually wait eleven whole months of my life in the DEP for this “hardcore” Infantry Security Forces MOS? Was I not proud of myself for becoming a MARINE? But then I realized something that broke the dam of my cognitive dissosance loose once and for all. The Marine Corps…….my recruiters…my Drill Instructors……my chain of command, hell even the popular culture and the goddamn commercials ALL FUCKING LIED. No, you DON’T become human after Marine Week, instead of being called a stupid ass recruit, now you become a stupid ass private. No you DON’T go to fucking war and be heroic and die fighting for the rights of Afghan women. You go sign up to do firewatch, scrub toilets (NOT HEADS, TOILETS), march up hills with ludicrously impractical equipment, yell loudly, scrub more toilets, mop floors, clean piece of shit rifles that don’t even fucking work and sometimes explode on people, do childish handmovements, greet the SNCOIC who is always late to his own formation who never returns it anyway, keep Nouri Al Maliki in power who your commander in chief later removes from power publicly, and scrub more godamned awful toilets! Then after it’s all over and done, you lie to yourself you “served” your country because it would be far too painful to admit that you basically wasted five years of the best parts of your life away from family, friends, loved ones, lovers, and basic human decency all for nothing. And when the cognitive dissosance broke, what website did I think of, that I scoffed at such a long time ago….. Surely, those nutjobs didn’t have that many members right? Well, teufel deufel, it looks like those unmotivated crazies were right weren’t they? Looking back, I feel so lucky refusing to train, that I feel like I scored a jackpot! I think it’s in these two demographics that this website has the greatest relevance, poolies, and Boot Camp graduates. Herein lies the two groups of people who still have an ability to be educated on how to get the hell out of the Corpse when it’s still relatively easy. It’s very nice to bitch and moan about the idiots in the Fleet and the superiors we all hate, but it isn’t really going to affect things unless we solve the problem before it starts, does it?

Can you imagine how much change for the better we could cause, if the Marine Corpse’s recruits and students just stopped going? The bastards wouldn’t have any choice but to improve things! The Marine Corpse is like an infectious disease, man, you gotta kill it using preventative medicine, before you can find any use from the DNA of the Corpse at hand. This website in all it’s vivid, damn near professorial detail IS that preventative medicine. May it live long an prosper.

tl:dr

Looking back, I feel so lucky refusing to train, that I feel like I scored a jackpot! I think it’s in these two demographics that this website has the greatest relevance, poolies, and Boot Camp graduates. The Marine Corpse is like an infectious disease, man, you gotta kill it using preventative medicine, before you can find any use from the DNA of the Corpse at hand.”

Me:

“I might turn this discussion of ours into an article. You cool with that?”

Ohreally:

“Sure. Put it on Facebook too, twitter, whatever. Tell the world about the Marine Corpse and just how much of another big dumb useless government bureaucracy it is.”


Some other comments:

Bubbafett:

“Through one of the posts in Terminal Lance. It was mostly rants…then when people started posting about problems, questions and answers I got on more.

I was also on leatherneck. Few guys there actually answered the questions-especially the bitch who was a female Marine. I would see her rip on people who ask questions.

This site reminds me of a vital lesson in life, a person or an organization must see their problem for what it is. They must brainstorm on how to solve it, then solve it. If you are too proud to see the issues, you will have bigger problems.”

Wow:

“A former Marine I know of liked Terminal Lance and I read some of the comics. It painted a different picture of the Marine Corps than what I initially thought it would be. Wisesloth’s list of reasons not to join the military included this website as well.

While I can understand that the USMC may be a victim of its ego, in how motarded it can be, I was still floored in how it could be as bad as this site said it was. My image of the Marine Corps went from finest fighting force with it being my first choice of military branch to dysfunctional place with the nicest uniforms and best choice of colors. Part of me still wants to join, with one telling me to join if I want to become a Marine, for that express reason, but I am very skeptical now.

The Navy has now become my first choice in joining, with the Air Force being second. It seems like the Navy is the best service branch, in terms of balance: it’s a military branch in the waters, while the Air Force is a sterile corporation and the Marine Corps being a motarded cult, with the Army soon going the way of the Marine Corps.

MARSOC looks like a good organization, but is it worth joining the USMC to get to MARSOC, especially when MARSOC has its own problems from the bigger USMC organization, and when there’s no guarantee for actually getting selected? In one MARSOC video on Youtube posted by Funker530, some commenter who had Sergeant in his username talk down to me in one my comments regarding the FN SCAR and the Woodland camouflage pattern, with his changing his tone after I clarified.

Who knows, it might just be a perception difference. People don’t experience reality the same way. But when there’s a lot of people speaking against the Marine Corps and telling people not to join, in the form of websites and articles, it makes you think twice before joining.”

MC_Fraud_Waste_&_Abuse:

“Great site S. I wish there could have been something like this in 1994-1995 time frame. Would have saved me a lot of disappointment, heartbreak, and wasted time/work.”

How did you hear about iHateTheUSMC and what was your first impression?

I have been in the Marine Corps since 2011, and I have despised every fucking minute of it.

I have been in the Marine Corps since 2011, and I have despised every fucking minute of it. Like all boots, I went to basic training expecting to join a cool, useful, relevant organization, but quickly discovered how it was all bullshit. Throughout my enlistment, I have spent more time with a broom in my hand than a rifle. I have spent more time cleaning things than shooting things. I have never deployed anywhere, but you bet your sweet ass I’ve participated in all important uniform inspections!(sarcasm). These past 3+ years have been a huge fucking waste of time. Although I have my fair share of friends that haven’t accomplished shit since high school, I also have friends that have graduated college and started their lives, meanwhile I’m sitting here typing this up on a government computer at work because there’s nothing else I give a shit about enough here to do. I work about 14 hours, almost every fucking day, and I’d say about 5 of them are usually spent dicking around on the internet. Why? Because marine corps fucking inefficiency, that’s why. I hate this fucking job. I hate being here, I hate thinking about it, I hate doing it. Every week i sit here counting down the hours until the end of my shift.(Which is usually irrelevant, cause i always end up staying and extra fucking hour or two!) Days off are few and far between, and are usually spent sleeping all fucking day to make up for the lack of sleep I get during the week. Im tired. Tired of this job, tired of this unit, and tired of this fucking organization.  My EAS is the light at the end of the tunnel, and although it is not yet within reach, it is within sight.

I have spent the last two years on Okinawa. I’m sure anyone that has been stationed here after ’95 can appreciate how fucking miserable it is.  Midnight curfews, liberty “buddy” policies, and whatever other bullshit rules some asshole with stars on his collar came up with as a way to cover his own ass whenever someone fucks up. I’ve always found it interesting how the marine corps can take an awesome tropical island, full of beaches, warm weather, and beautiful women, and turn it into a miserable fucking prison. The thought of offing myself comes to mind at least once a day. Im constantly feeling anxious about the stupid bullshit I have to deal with. There’s days I cant sleep, there’s days I forget to eat, and I am generally fucking miserable. Part of me wishes that this post does get intercepted by someone, just so I can loose my security clearance and not have to work here anymore. But knowing this organization, I would just wind up getting fucked out of my GI bill some way or another.

This post is mostly just me trying to vent, but I would like to know if anyone else out there feels this way. Who else has an MOS that they absolutely fucking hate? Who else has a countdown timer app that shows exactly how long till their EAS? Who else checks that timer every time they get the chance? Who has been through this shit before and has advice to offer for getting through it in one piece?

Happy to join this site,

Submitted by: Juan

How Karate Stopped Me from Joining the USMC

I’m not a Marine, I never have been. Hell, I’ve never even served. That being said, for about a year or two in a previous life, I had ambitions of joining the Marine Corps and was really gung-ho about becoming the part of the Few and the Proud. Well…let’s just say things changed when I started doing some research on the organization. “The Few and The Proud” started to become “The Few Misguided Youth and Old Bastards Who Can’t Make it in the Real World and Hence Make the Lives of The Few Misguided Youth Hell for no Reason.” I have to say, when I first came across the iHateTheUSMC website, I did not take the stories seriously. I thought “hey, these are probably a bunch of fuckups who couldn’t suck it up and get the job done”. Well, one story could be that case. 10? Maybe. 100? Uh…. A fuck-ton of stories?!!!… something’s up here…..

Shit really hit me like a brick when I began experiencing the stories I read on this site at the Dojo I practiced at. I felt like a misguided youth who had joined a very cool sounding organization to accomplish great things, but instead realized all he had accomplished was wasting a fuck-ton of time. Below I have listed a list of scenarios. Now, read them and try to guess whether they are my experiences from Karate or experiences listed by Marines on this website. (hint hint…the list is not mutually exclusive)

1 – Junior ranking members having to listen to bullshit about spirit and culture that senior ranking members pull out of their assholes

2 – Hearing terms like “warrior” or “warrior spirit” from clown-like senior members who couldn’t beat a squirrel in a fist fight

3 – Having to take shit from a senior ranking member (who by the way is like 6 inches or a feet shorter than you are) and having to fight the urge to strangle them till they stop fucking twitching

4 – Realizing the outdated fighting methods you practice only belong in the outdated centuries they were created in

5 – Having to do some bullshit salutation for a certain group of high ranking members (who may also be a feet shorter than you and not be able to beat a squirrel in a fist fight) or facing the consequences

6 – Having to take shit from experienced “warrior” who can even throw a fucking jab. Seriously, a simple fucking jab

7 – You and your friends constantly doing impressions of you clown ass superiors and the stupid meaningless shit they say behind their backs

8 – Being chewed out for not understanding a command that would not make sense in a fucking mental ward

9 – Reflecting on the terrible decisions you have made and wishing you had joined a more effective organization

10 – Leaving before you make rank because hell… you would rather cut your balls off with a dull plastic knife than to become one of your clown fucking superiors one day

11 – Seeing idiots who can’t fight for shit being promoted before you because they are really good at sucking dick and kissing ass and also memorizing and reciting bullshit that your seniors think is important

12 – Being extremely qualified, but not being promoted because of a technicality that no one can even fucking define (Seriously…dear high ranking member…what the fuck are you talking about? You can’t even throw a jab)

13 – Idiots becoming favorites of your superiors because they look good in their perfect little (with extra emphasis on little) uniforms

14 – Being micromanaged by the superiors mentioned above, even though everyone knows they don’t know what the fuck they’re doing

15 – Oh my god, I can’t believe I almost forgot about this! Ridiculous fucking haircuts worn by certain gung-ho superiors

16 – One word: Motards

I could go on and on and on and on but I’ll stop here. Anyways, thank you karate and iHateTheUSMC for preventing me from making another god awful life decision. I have made so many before.

Submitted by: Sensei Tater Salad

“It is what you make of it” is complete bullshit.

Over the four years of my enlistment, my average PFT score was 291, my average CFT was 296. I never shot below expert and had a first class swim qual. I had 17 MCIs done by the fourth month of becoming a lance, followed by twelve book reports over the following 3 years for all the good they did me. I had my CAR, a NAM, a cert com and an admittedly bullshit letter of commendation. I spent my enlistment in Oki and the rest in Afghanistan and training. I was a guide in Boot Camp for a while and a squad leader for the rest and in SOI (I could run fast and do a fuck load of pull-ups which made me a good leader). I don’t expect for a second that this list of “accomplishments” will impress anyone, I just want you to realize that your offhanded discounting of the issues raised on this site as the pitiful whimpering of shit bags is exactly what makes the Marine Corps “not the best job in the world cause more often times than not it sucks”.

I call bullshit on your oft used phrase “it is what you make of it”. When your car runs into a swam, you can spin your wheels all you want but you’ll only sink in deeper. Promotions in the Marine Corps aren’t based off of MOS proficiency like the other branches, after you max out your P/CFT and rifle scores you get to twiddle your thumbs up your ass till your TIS/G raises your score to the promotion level. If that doesn’t appeal to you, you can always pull that green weenie out your ass and start blowing that bitch like a big boy because if your SNCOs like you you’re golden.

Depending on your MOS, it may be mathematically impossible to be promoted in your first enlistment if it’s not done meritoriously. Depending on your SNCOs, you may have to prove your devildogginess through stabbing your platoon mates in the back repeatedly and publicly. If you’re willing to turn on your peers like a rabid fucking dog, your time in the lower ranks may quickly be over. That may be why so many “seniors” look down on the pittances of problems in the lower ranks; their time in the lower ranks was quickly ended by their understanding superiors through meritorious promotion after trading their honor for an assumed position of authority.

Now that I’m out, I enjoy nothing more than convincing others not to make the same fucking mistake I did in trusting that recruiter to keep his word. The funniest thing is that once you get out, it actually is what you make of it, and that’s why seemingly ¾ of Marines Re-enlist. You can talk about grabbing my balls all you want, I enjoy working for companies that actually care how good I am at my job and how efficiently I accomplish tasks. I attend school full time and still make more money a month than I ever did in the Marine Corps. I don’t have to listen to alcoholics tell me not to drink, a literal baby killer and wife beater tell me that I’m not living up to ethical standards, or have to hear hard ass bad ass jack ass motherfuckers like you tell me how easy I have it and how much harder you had it x years ago. I don’t have to spend my time swallowing my pride and listening to my honor and principles get questioned by those who have none.

I also don’t have to pretend to be intimidated by a fuckwit who happened to be promoted before me because, for some mysterious reason, I did my job better than him and I got his job after a few weeks. I know it sounds like voodoo, but I didn’t have to prove that I knew how many and what types of ear rings are allowed to be worn by females in uniform to be promoted in less than a few fucking years. I also didn’t have to publically humiliate my co-workers to get in the good graces of my almighty overlords.

As to my lack of ambition in the Marine Corps, I fully intended to make the Marine Corps a career. I wasn’t expecting a rose garden, I wanted to be one of the few the proud, I wanted to fight with and be a part of the best of the best, I swallowed the hype hook line sinker and pole. I expected a combat MOS, I got signed onto a contract that held about 15 jobs, and I was promised that I’d get that one right there in the middle. Just ignore the rest, they don’t count. I got locked into a job for four years that I hadn’t known existed before enlisting. Oh, I could still go MARSOC, I only had to wait two years and the re-enlist for an additional five to six years for the opportunity to attempt the indoc. Yea, I fucked up, and my gullible ass is to blame for it. I accept that, and I am moving on. I won’t keep quiet about life in the Marine Corps now that I’m out though, that’s one more thing that your beloved disorganization got wrong; there’s a real difference between sucking up hard times and moving forward, and being a timid bitch who doesn’t speak up for himself and against the legitimate problems he sees. Keeping quiet and ignoring the problems you see around you is not being a man, it’s being a coward.

– freeatlastfreeatlast

Original comment

The Marine Corps is difficult, but it’s difficult for the wrong reasons. It’s difficult in the wrong ways.

The following is a response to a comment written by a very gung ho individual. I figured it should be turned into an article.

You’re doing the same thing that so many Marine hopefuls do, focusing on boot camp and ignoring the 4+ years that come after it. While the dropout rate from boot camp may be comparable to other services (I don’t know if it is, I don’t feel like looking that up right now), the first enlistment attrition rate for the USMC is much higher than other branches.

As you noted, and I agree, the Marine Corps attracts motivated and determined people, most of whom choose the Marine Corps because they see it as the hard choice, a right of passage to manhood, the elite branch of the world’s elite military, etc. I think from personal experience that there are more optimistic hopefuls that join the Marines out of a sense of patriotic altruism than other branches, many of whom attract recruits through promises of job training and bonuses. Why then do so many of these determined young men literally leave in disgust after their first enlistment when compared to the other branches? Why is this branch the only one with a genuine hate site dedicated to it?

While it may sound strange, the Marine Corps is difficult, but it’s difficult for the wrong reasons. It’s difficult in the wrong ways.

While it could be difficult to establish and hold to personalized physical training regimens within platoons or squads, that the participants might see results in higher P/CFT scores, you more often than not are treated to a lovely helping of squad pushups, buddy carries, and a six mile shuffle while screaming about a little yellow birdy every morning. Because that’s how the Marine Corps does PT, in sync and to the lowest common denominator.

While it could be difficult working with firm but fair NCO’s who know their jobs like the backs of their hands, you more often than not are directly supervised by semi-literate rubes who don’t know the difference between metric and standard but can tell you right now how high the female dress shoe heel is authorized to be, or how many steps a burial detail is meant to take from the hearse to the grave. Because those are questions that are asked on a board, and that’s how the Marine Corps finds promotion worthy enlisted.

It could be difficult to maintain gear to be ready at all times, but you’ll typically be tasked instead to ensure the SL-3 is complete, the record jacket is updated, the serial numbers are cataloged, the history , chips, dings, dents, scratches, the goddamn scuff marks, are all carefully annotated. It doesn’t matter that the fire extinguishers in the SL-3 are empty, the spare batteries are dripping acid, the Jerry cans have half an inch of mud and oil in them, and the gear is held together with 550 cord and prayers. Those problems are not what the inspection looks for, so they don’t exist. All that truly matters is that the unit looks good on paper.

Then there are things that shouldn’t be difficult, but the Marine Corps just love to make them so.

Walking from point A to point B? You’re marching in step to cadence while those who outrank you walk behind you laughing at how unfortunate/retarded you are.

Need to clean you room? You’re going to be at it every week at least once a week for at least five hours. Did you clean it well enough? Well, that depends on the mood of the inspector, and whether or not he wants to spend the weekend at home.

Spending your weekend not working? You get to listen to someone tell you not to rape, murder, pillage, or plunder the surrounding populace for a while after standing in formation for a few hours. Want to go on a vacation? You’re going to fill out and sign a form that says that you promise not to rape, murder, pillage, or plunder the populace after hearing the same speech. Depending on where you plan to go, you may also promise not to, among other things, swim in jellyfish infested waters, buy/sell/use/traffic drugs, train or sell gear to drug dealers (I’m not kidding), participate in human trafficking, or assault local law enforcement or their families. Why would you have to do this? So there’s a piece of paper to cover the ass of whoever is in charge of you, because, as an officer once analogized so poetically to me, “When a dog shits on your carpet, do you blame the dog, or his master, the one who trained him?”.

Many Marines have it much worse than these petty grievances, some feel frustrated that after over a decade of friends, limbs, and minds being spent in shit pit locales for semi-coherent and often changing reasons, said shit pits refuse to stop being so damned shitty. I was lucky, I got out with all my fingers and toes and had only one friend die many miles away from me when I was in Afghan. I never really said goodbye to him before separating, and I never saw him again. I didn’t have to listen to him scream and feel worthless like the guys that were with him. What then does our unit do to honor this Marine? Why, throw him a funeral on Leatherneck of course. Who got to stand out in the sun in the middle of the summer at various parade poses while listening to bible verses and speeches made by people who didn’t know him? His friends. Who sat in shaded stands while this funeral went down? A bunch of pretentious officers that couldn’t tell you the first thing about the guy, but oh so honored his memory with their very presence.

It’s these and many other endless, repetitive, grinding, pointlessly stupid slights to our pride and intelligence that drove so many of us out. Where we expected to find a rite of passage, we found pointlessly endless belittlement. We feel betrayed and lied to, we feel genuine hatred towards that disorganization that asked for so much, took what we gave, chewed us up and spat us out without a second glance. We feel taken advantage of, stepped on, thanklessly abused for no other purpose other than to feed the egos of those who didn’t deserve our respect.

The question then becomes why do some stay in? Some seemed to like it, these people were typically pretty low achievers before coming into the Marines, and find something there that’s a whole lot better than than where they came from. Speaking again from personal experience, many others stay in because they don’t want to try their luck on the outside, in the “real world”. I heard many arguments like “the economy sucks right now”, “all of life sucks, not just the Marine Corps”, “As soon as you pick up ‘insert next rank here’ you don’t have to do shit, why leave now?”. In truth, it think many senior enlisted and commissioned simply forget how things really are, and see their careers through rose tinted glasses. In the end, I think it’s something like this:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v…

Things won’t change until these issues come to light and are actually addressed. That’s what being a Marine should mean, finding your flaws and addressing them.

– freeatlastfreeatlast

 

Original comment: http://ihatetheusmc.com/first-regretted-quitting-now-glad-more-than-ever/#comment-1622140016

The Life of a Marine Corps Recruiter Part 6

“What’s up warriors you can lead a horse to water and you can make it drink. If you work it hard enough.” Great speech SgtMaj did you think of that all by yourself or after you got done pressing your track suit out and wonder why it melts. I think to myself hearing that please god don’t let me say stuff that stupid ever. How is that suppose to motivate me or make me understand training any better? It just makes me wonder how stupid you really might be and what you think about with no Marines around you. Then your closing comments you give at the end of training holy shit. Because of days like today I want to stick my face in a deep fryer. Wait I can’t because then I wouldn’t be able to write my contract and would have to go to zero training to be told I suck at life. Oh wait again I was already told that this month. Screw it I’ll just be defiant and sarcastic maybe I’ll work on my NASA resume or Political campaign.

Submitted by:  2807aListofLies

The Life of a Marine Corps Recruiter Part 5

So it’s been a bit but I had a CFT this last week and during this I thought to myself how does being able to lift a 30 pound ammo can over my head 90 some plus times make me combat effective? The only thing I saw from it was being able to make ones self more effective for a working party. During my times on a deployments’s I have never handed an ammo can 90 plus times to a gunner. Never on a range have I ever had to do that let alone had a whole ammo can to lift maybe 50 rounds from that can is about it. For that matter I don’t remember the last time I did 20 pull ups in combat environment either unless pting. I guess what I feel the Corps needs to is maybe make physical standards more up the ally of what we do like be able to hike with a pack in certain amount of time. Then also maybe some mental test like breaking down a 50 cal and putting it back together. Don’t get me wrong i think physical fitness is important, but I see good Marines who can’t do a lot of pull ups or run well either. That happen to be very fundamentally sound when it comes to knowledge of weapons and can hike 60 miles with a 130 pounds on his back. But yep still a shit bag to the command, but knows more about the stuff that matters then his shit bag NCO’s snorting no explode off each others abbs. He’ll get out though go to college and do great things, and those NCO’s will still make those new young Marines dumber and dumber, because that shit bag isn’t around to show them any more. Best part of recruiting talking to an applicant when the SgtMaj calls to yell at you and putting him on speaker so the kid gets a real taste of it. Stay peachy time to go eat my free Apple Bees meal happy Veterans Day guys.

Submitted by:  2807aListofLies

The Life of a Marine Corps Recruiter Part 4

You know what every kid has in common I come across on recruiting duty? They all play COD and can’t do any pull ups. I hurt a kids feelings because he hangs from the bar makes an attempt to do what resembled pulling himself up, but with out result. Then drops off and shakes his arms out. “REALLY” you kidding me? You had to shake your arms out for doing nothing. But it’s not just one kid it’s multiple kids doing none and then me being the deep thinker I am think where did the muscle go. How come kids just get weaker and weaker every year. Well it’s because a failed education system, most schools will graduate a kid just for the government money they receive. So again what we do teach them is hard work is not required to make it in life. Instead these kids come out with this idea that somebody will take care of them and help them get by. The sad thing is they’re right and that’s when I came to my conclusion that we do teach kids something how to fail, and that if they don’t want to work the system will take care of them. I kid you not these kids know all the ends and outs of government aid. How could this be though wait a minute? Could it be the parents? I remember this really cool thing I use to hear called the” American Dream” kind of like that dream with 4 models at one time now never gonna happen. Sorry to get so political on this one gents just can’t believe how the education system is failing not just the kids but this nation, and therefore you. The future can be bright though I know I will be volunteering more at my local high school for tutoring and mentor ship programs. Not as a Marine but as a person who just wants to help give a little hope back to a failed system, got to keep a glass half full right.

Submitted by:  2807aListofLies

The Life of a Marine Corps Recruiter Part 3

So today I had sector training it’s kind of like getting taught how to be more dynamic at recruiting once a month. By a bunch of Master Sgts that think they could sell Nazi stuff to a Jewish guy. When it comes down to it though they couldn’t sell cup cakes to a fat kid. Well my SgtMaj comes to his chance to talk and of course we get told we lack leadership and that we need to tighten up and get back to the basics. How NCO’s these days are weak and can’t lead and all and all as everyone knows we have ruined the Marine Corps. Well I wanted to ask the question who ruined us but didn’t not for fear, but for the fact that would in some magic allow him the ability to point me out as the problem. Then I would get a what the fuck and that I suck which is usually like a broken record anymore so I didn’t. Still though who ruined us is my question and what I figured out in about 3 seconds after all this leadership started, was they did. They’re the ones that let those precious standards diminish and be tarnished. Now I am a no nonsense person and believe in The Corps if it’s ran the right way is a good organization. Right now though its like Tijuana though full of lawless dicks who only take care of those who suck there dick and stds guys who stick to the system but do nothing to help it get better but make other people infected so they don’t care.

Submitted by:  2807aListofLies

The Life of a Marine Corps Recruiter Part 2

Another day on the prowl and one step closer to seeing some more problems with the Marine Corps. Today at the Recruiting Station Headquarters I witness a young man do not 20 pull-ups not 18 pull-ups, but zero pull-ups. Well according to the MCEOB (big book your recruiter showed you with pretty tags) you have to do 2 to be allowed to DEP in. Well this young man still gets to dep and gets a ship date within a three months from now so how did we teach him anything considered Marine Corps Values??? First we taught him that we don’t hold people to a standard or accountable to be prepared. Then I’m guessing his run time is going to be fast paced 22:30 mile and a half. Oh but he’s only 9 mins off from passing so he will be good in 3 months to head for the Island. Because he is so determined and moto about being a Marine cause then he gonna have all the ladies. Yeah right he is just going to play Xbox in a barracks room instead of his moms basement. Then fall out of runs and do no pull ups while the 2nd award PFC who got busted down for underage drinking in the barracks still gets called a piece of shit, and should be a meretourious corporal. He had such shitty NCO’s though that none of them did the right thing when he was drunk and slapped the duty for even trying to log it in the green book of wrong. Then grab the young Marine toss him in his room and pt the shit out of him in the morning. Then explain the right and wrong times to do things. Well time to go find a young man or lady and tell the Marine Corps Story again.

Submitted by:  2807aListofLies

GI Bill Predators Part 2

For me it all started when I graduated college and I was looking into starting a new career. I heard on the local news that the University of Phoenix was sponsoring “Hire A Hero” career event. I was excited because I thought to myself that this is a great thing that all of the employers are doing for vets! I live in Phoenix, Arizona, and generally the community is very supportive of veterans, but what I did not know was it was all just smoke and mirrors. Anyways, I was filled with a new kindred spirit and was ready to show corporate America what I was made of.  So I put three-piece suit on and got to my car to attend the event. I was greeted at the door by some military rep’s that worked for the college and was asked to sign into the event. It was crowded.  I was in shock to see just how many unemployed vets there were.  Most were just left active duty out and the others were older and looking for work.  After signing in we were all lead to the third floor of the campus to the booths of employers that were ready to hire veterans.  This was then I realized I was looking at a sham. It was disgraceful to see cooperate America offering highly skilled vets a chance to work for them for 12 dollars an hire sweeping floors. Now don’t get me wrong, I am not too good for that, I am just saying I didn’t work my ass off for four years studying to get a college education to be offered some job I could have received right out of high school. There were legitimate employers there but not enough of them.  And of course there were the “motards” there from each branch of service there wanting to see if there were any of us that desperate to join the reserves. It was laughable to see so many people crowded around their booths! Moving forward to the next room I see a sight I have never seen. I witnessed booth after booth that was set up to scam vets. These are the for-profit education programs that you see on television and online.  At first I thought this was a joke. I mean all I heard all week is that there would be legitimate employers looking to hire veterans, and I all I see are some snake oil salesmen looking to shack me and other vets down for cash. Unfortunately I saw a bunch of veterans around these booths talking to them and I could not understand why?
Don’t they know what they are getting into? I guess Barnum and Baily were right: “There is a sucker born every minute in America”.   What is the Moral of this story?
I will tell you.  You are in charge of what you want to make out of your life. Civilians who never served a damn day in the service don’t know what our skill sets are. They have no idea how smart we are. They don’t care.  Don’t settle for less unless you have to. If you worked hard to achieve your dreams don’t fall victim to assholes that are going to low ball you! These skills to survive in the “Corporate” Gang Bang have to be learned. Now back to the topic…. For- profit universities are everywhere and their main targets are veterans and other service members and their loved ones.  For those wanting to know the truth about what they do and how they operate stay tuned… I will be giving all the details to each and everyone of you so you can make a decision that is going to have an effect on your new career change.  Stay tuned for part 3!

GI Bill Predators Part 1

Like most of you, I am a veteran that did my time and lived to tell about it.  I was with a unit with bad leadership and due to that I decided the Marine Corps was not something I wanted to do for a career.  After a long period of moving around to dead end job after dead end job, I decided to throw caution to the wind and earn my college education.  It was always my dream to accomplish this. Like many of you, I had many questions concerning educational benefits and how to use them.  I was fortunate to go to Arizona State University. The staff was very helpful and aided me in my pursuit of my own personal educational goals. Like many of you, I was unable to purse education on active duty because of “mission essential” bullshit.  That was then and this now…. These for-profit universities prey on unsuspecting service members both active duty, reserve and prior service. I am speaking on experience because I used to work for one of these companies and I can tell you that they are all run the same.  I was a recruiter for South University, which is a part of Education Management Corporation.  I can tell you that no one who works for these companies cares about your education; all they care about is the “Bottom Line.” Let me break they down barney style: they don’t give a good fuck about you or your education, all they care about is enrolling you in class and getting you on the hook for your benefits.  In the next couple of days I am going to be sharing a few stories with all of you concerning for profit schools and other “Veteran Friendly” scams that I have seen with my own two eyes. I want to alert as many of you as possible about what goes on to veterans in these situations, and what you can do to avoid being scammed. Don’t read into the hype about these schools being voted as “veteran friendly”. The only friendly thing they do is smile while they are fucking you out of the benefits that you worked so hard to earn.

Submitted by: thewittyone

Let’s Play Why is it Hazing?

My goal here is to attempt explaining the Marine Corps Order regarding Hazing and provide some examples for context.  There is often confusion as to what can be defined as hazing, as the Marines have a tendency to push the envelope as far as possible when it comes to this particular subject and fight it with every base-less logic they can come up with in order to keep each other out of trouble and save their unit’s reputation.

The Marine Corps Order on Hazing (MCO 1700.28B http://www.marines.mil/Portals/59/Publications/MCO 1700.28B.pdf) can be a Marine’s best friend.  It is one of the few Orders that were written to increase the quality of life for everyone.

Not everyone clearly understands the Order, however.  The examples used in many classes are only of an extreme nature, most pointing to the “blood-winging” video released in the 1990’s.  Hazing can be much less violent and much more discrete than that, and the Order clearly states this fact.

According to Section 2 of the Order, hazing is “any conduct whereby a military member or members, regardless of Service or rank, without proper authority causes another military member or members, regardless of Service or rank, to suffer or be exposed to any activity which is cruel, abusive, humiliating, oppressive, demeaning, or harmful.”  It goes further, stating that “soliciting or coercing another to perpetrate any such activity” is also considered hazing.

So what is considered hazing?  Well, following the Order again, “hazing need not involve physical contact between military members; it can be verbal or psychological in nature.”   What this means is that hazing is not just assaulting the new guy, it is also terrorizing him by ANY other means.

Specific examples in the Order are:  “physically striking another to inflict pain outside of a supervised training exercise; piercing another’s skin in any manner (such as “pinning,” “tacking on,” or “blood wing(ing),”); verbally berating another for the sole purpose of belittling or humiliating; encouraging another to excessively consume alcohol or encouraging another to engage in illegal, harmful, or dangerous acts; playing abusive or ridiculous tricks; threatening or offering violence or bodily harm to another; branding; taping; tattooing; shaving; greasing; painting; requiring excessive physical exercise beyond what is required to meet standards; or the forced consumption of food, alcohol, drugs, or any other substance.”

Hazing is not always an NCO treating their Marines like shit.  Section 2d states that hazing can also occur “between peers or involve actions toward senior military personnel by those junior in rank or grade to them.”  Although rare, this does happen, usually to a young officer or NCO.

With such a broad description, many leaders question what is NOT considered hazing.  To their question, refer to Section 2e:  “Properly administered EMI…is not hazing; it provides a tool for small unit leaders to increase proficiency of the unit or individuals in assigned duties.”  It also states that an EMI (Extra Military Instruction) is required to be applied logically and that and is not to be used as a punishment, but as a way to positively correct a carefully identified deficiency.  An EMI may not last longer than two hours per day, must be held immediately prior to or following the work day (if conditions do not allow, the EMI must take place at a different REASONABLE time), may not last longer than it takes to correct the deficiency, should not be conducted on the member’s Sabbath, and may not be used to deprive someone of the normal liberty that they would be otherwise entitled (member can turn to liberty after completion of EMI.)  Only the CO or OIC have the authority to assign EMI after normal working hours, but they also have the authority to delegate this power to officers and NCO’s whose duties include training.

The policy very clearly states in Section 3a that hazing is unlawful, prohibited, will not be tolerated in Marine units or detachments, will not be condoned or ignored, and that it is every Marine’s responsibility to ensure that it does not occur in any form on any level.  Violating, attempting to violate, or persuading others to violate the Order are also prohibited.  Marines found to be violating the Order may also be subject to other violations of the UCMJ such as Articles 80 (Attempts), 81 (conspiracy), 92 (violation of a lawful general order), 93 (cruelty and maltreatment), 124 (maiming), 128 (assault), 133 (conduct unbecoming an officer and gentleman), and 134 (general article).

Reprisals or revenge schemes that in any way come from hazing allegations are strictly prohibited.  Victims of hazing are to report all incidents and evidence thereof to their CO immediately.  Commanders are required to conduct a preliminary investigation into every report and all personnel are required to exhibit extreme caution and sensitivity throughout the proceedings to minimize re-victimization.  Investigations are to be focused on the environment that fostered hazing while attempting to prevent future incidents.  Commanders must provide advocacy services for their subordinates and closely monitor victims for stress reactions associated with physical and psychological abuse.

What does all of that mean?  It means you should be able to perform your duties as a Marine without having to worry about being subjected to humiliating forms of torture for things such as being late to work or getting promoted to a higher rank.  It means you don’t need to live in fear.

To put this into context, here are some examples that could be considered hazing by the current Order:

That SNCO that humiliated you in front of the entire company by telling you that you are a worthless piece of shit that doesn’t belong in his beloved Corps because you failed field day has hazed you.
Why is it hazing?  Screaming that kind of vitriol at you was not constructive, did not correct a deficiency, was humiliating, and degraded your reputation in front of your peers.

You were five minutes late for PT formation so Sgt Motardovez woke you up at 0500 on Saturday and PT’d you for three hours.
Why is it hazing?  Physical Training can not be used as a punishment, and running does not correct the problem of you being late.

A senior Lcpl instructed you to go to the tool room and request a boltstretcher, 50 feet of shore line, a can of A-I-R, bottle of blinker fluid, Prick E-5, or any other imaginary object.
Why is it hazing?  Although hilarious and tame by Marine standards, they are purposely sending you on a “dummy” mission in order to humiliate you, and possibly get you a hardcore ass-chewing (if the tool room NCO is a Sergeant…)

You partied a little too hard and passed out…then your fellow Lcpls stripped you naked and drew penises all over you.
Why is it hazing?  Once again, pointless humiliation, and Marines are supposed to be better than that.

You are a Cpl and your Sgt just told you to fail Pfc Bootballs and Lcpl BouttoEAS for field day because one is a boot and the other is a shitbag.
Why is it hazing?  Conspiring to haze someone is still hazing.

Cpl Fuckface and Cpl Roidrage kick your door in and inform you that if you attempt to complain about Sgt Dickbrain’s hazing you, they will beat the bloody shit out of you.
Why is it hazing?  They are intimidating you for speaking out, and that is an act of reprisal.

Cpl PFT thought you didn’t sound off enough, so he took you into one of the storage containers and IT’d you boot camp style.
Why is it hazing?  Incentive Training (IT) is only authorized at Marine Corps Recruit Depots.

One of your SNCO’s referred to you as an extremely disrespectful derogatory term for someone of your background (race, religion, sex, orientation, etc.) in formation, during a class, or in public.
Why is it hazing?  Not only is this humiliating, it is attempting to turn you into an outcast among your peers.

The following section is about hazing on social media sites and the internet.

Your NCO or another fellow Marine took pictures of you and posted them on the internet for the purpose of making fun of your appearance.
Why is it hazing?  Posting pictures, even in an unofficial capacity, that may bring discredit upon the Marine Corps is in direct violation of the Marine Corps Policy on Social Media Guidance [http://www.marines.mil/News/SocialMedia/Guidance.aspx] and the Marines Social Media Handbook [http://www.marines.mil/Portals/59/Docs/Marines-Social-Media-Handbook[1].pdf].&nbsp; Attempting to humiliate another service member is hazing.

A picture you posted of yourself ended up on another website and active duty Marines have posted offensive derogatory comments.
Why is it hazing?  Quoting the Social Media Guidance document: “Marines should avoid offensive and inappropriate behavior that
could bring discredit upon themselves and the Marine Corps. This
behavior includes posting any defamatory, libelous, obscene, abusive,
threatening, racially or ethnically hateful, or otherwise offensive or
illegal information or material
.”  Also, this can be seen as an act of humiliation.

One of your pictures ended up on another website and one of your fellow Marines posted your name or other personal information.
Why is it hazing?  From the Social Media Guide:  “Marines should be extremely judicious when disclosing personal details
on the Internet, and should not release personal identifiable
information (PII) that could be used to distinguish their individual
identity or that of another Marine.”  Giving out your personal information can open the door for criminals or anyone else to harass, defame, or humiliate you.

Another Marine created a fake social media profile, used your pictures, and is pretending to be you.
Why is it hazing? They are trying to defame or humiliate you and possibly sabotage your career.  Social Media Guidance states that Marines “should not disguise, impersonate or otherwise misrepresent their identity or affiliation with the Marine Corps.”

There are too many possibilities to list, but pay attention because if you witness it you must report it.  It IS your responsibility.  Hazing is such a huge problem mainly because no one speaks out about it until it is too late.  The best advice I can give is this:  If you think you are the victim of hazing, research the Order and speak with a peer that you trust, then report and document EVERYTHING.  How often you have barracks duty, the frequency of your addition to working parties, how often you fail field day, your work load increase, literally everything.  Finding witnesses helps, if you can get them to man up and step forward with you.  If someone threatens you to drop it or else, report them too.  Whatever you do, do not let them think they can control you with fear, because that is how this shit spreads and sticks around.  Some members of your unit will try that macho bravado brotherhood bullshit and call you a bitch or a pussy.  Let them.  Your SNCO’s and officers will let your NCO’s know not to fuck with you because you will, in fact, not stand up for that bullshit, and those NCO’s will comply whether they like it or not.  If you get to a new unit, that reputation will follow you, but it won’t be bad.  Most of the guys will understand the situation and give you respect for standing up for yourself like an adult.

Hopefully Helpful Links:
Marine Corps Order on Hazing  http://www.marines.mil/Portals/59/Publications/MCO 1700.28B.pdf
Marines Social Media Guidance  http://www.marines.mil/News/SocialMedia/Guidance.aspx
Marines Social Media Handbook  http://www.marines.mil/Portals/59/Docs/Marines-Social-Media-Handbook[1].pdf

Submitted by: AAVPOG

Your favorite “NCO Can’t Do His Job” story

Meritorious promotion boards are a joke.  They are the military equivalent of a beauty pageant.  Marines that excel at PT, uniform maintenance, and false motivation compete for a promotion instead of a tiara.  Many Marines do not like or respect these NCO’s due to the fact that they often cannot perform their MOS properly for someone who is in the position of a working supervisor.

Of the many Marines that I met whom could not perform their job but were meritoriously promoted, Corporal Dickbag was my least favorite.  He was Motor T and came to Okinawa as a Lance fresh from school.  Being a squad leader at boot camp and the guide at school, of course he was more motarded than most boots, and loved to show that shit in front of Staff.  This, along with his 300 PFT, caught their attention and within months he was being prepped for a board.

He won.  Everyone in his section, senior Lances and Corporals alike, hated him and complained about his inability to turn a wrench, so he was made into their paperwork bitch.  If you know much about Marines, you know that the most useless guys are often the most moto and full of shit.

Our battalion loved to cross-train since we had Motor T and a 4th echelon (read: rebuilding shit) shop.  One of the other companies sent a few boots to learn how to do a rack adjustment on an LVS and we needed someone to properly teach them.  Should we have one of the Lance Corporals who have been to advanced school, or should we grab an NCO because…um…he’s an NCO and it would make us look better?  Obviously grab someone that definitely knows what they are doing, right?

Diesel engines have a tendency to “run away” under the right conditions.  When this happens, fuel and air are sucked into the combustion chambers at an accelerating rate, possibly ending in catastrophic failure.  The LVS engine is equipped with a turbocharger, making this possibility much more dangerous but easier to deal with:  Putting a clipboard over the turbo to cut the air supply shuts it down very quickly.  Anyone who has been trained to do this kind of work knows this.

While teaching boots how to adjust this LVS, by reading off a checklist on a clipboard mind you, the engine starts to run away.  Corporal Dickbag panics, looking to his paperwork for answers as one of our Lcpls that happened to be nearby yelled to him to cut off the air.  Dickbag, holding his clipboard in one hand, snatches a handful of rags with the other and shoves his fist into the air shredding 120,000+rpm spinning blades of the turbocharger.  He pulled back a stump.

Put your left hand flat on a table then cover your fingers only from the last knuckle on your index finger to the first knuckle on your pinky.  That is what he lost.

He went TAD soon after that, then passed the recon indoc when his hand healed.  I saw him with a recon platoon in Thailand the next year during Cobra Gold.  They called him Stumpy.

That engine did stop, though, and it was sent to our shop to rebuild.

An Open Letter: Apologies for Field Day

Dear Backbone of the Marine Corps (the ACTUAL one),

I’m going to start by apologizing to you for the behavior of myself and your other NCO’s during Field Day.  While we DO have to make sure your room is clean, we DON’T have to be total cocks about it.  The Marine Corps has a certain set of standards for everything that…well…um…nobody really knows 100% what those standards for dust are…but…uh…standards, devil!

Shit, sorry.  I forgot how to think for myself for a moment.

I’m sorry I pulled your bed, nightstands, and wardrobes away from the wall and made you clean behind them.  I knew Gunny wasn’t going to check back there, but Sgt. Nazi told us we had to keep you up until at least 0200 because you didn’t sound off loud enough last Monday during PT.

I’m sorry I stuck my greasy finger on your mirror while pointing out the salt-grain-sized spot in the corner and smudged it all the way across.  That, admittedly, was a dick move.

I’m sorry I swiped my finger along that little crack where the back of the toilet meets the floor.  Not only was that completely unnecessary, I’m pretty sure that’s how I got Hepatitis.

I’m sorry I opened your unsecured wall locker, threatened to steal all of your shit, then telling you that you are the reason that there are thieves in the Marine Corps.  To be completely honest, there are thieves in the Marine Corps because we have a legacy of stealing shit and calling it “acquiring.”

I’m sorry I tossed that little bit of dirt I palmed under your shoe display and failed you for it.  Staff Sergeant Reprisal showed me that one.

I’m sorry I made you all stand out in formation for thirty-seven minutes while the other NCO’s and I stood around bullshitting about who we were going to fail, why, and what for.  I know you could have used that time to work on your room, even though it would have failed anyways because Top doesn’t want any of you to get in trouble this weekend while he’s the SDO.

I’m sorry I kept you up until 0330 when you had driver duty the next day.  I know how much it sucks to have to drive the SDO, OOD, and Bn Admin guys around all day and night on three hours of sleep, and I know the Order states that drivers must be permitted to sleep for 8 hours prior to duty to keep them from falling asleep behind the wheel and killing someone, but you fell out of that run a few weeks ago and Sgt Motard thinks this will help you become a better Marine.  Also, I apologize for chewing your ass for disrespect and talking back then threatening you with NJP when you politely reminded me that you had duty.

I’m sorry I got drunk and kicked your door in a couple of hours after I told you you could sleep.  That…there is no explanation for that.  Sorry.

I’m sorry I let Sgt Bumblefuck snatch you up for that working party.  Had I known the acidic substance he chose to use to attempt cleaning the sidewalks would only make a bigger, permanent mess, I would have acquired the keys to the haz-mat locker before he could get his stupid, fat fingers on them.

I’m sorry I volunteered you for morning cleanup last week.  I thought I heard you whisper something in formation, turns out it was Cpl Fucktard!

I’m sorry I yelled, “and none of you better have a fucked up shoe display like Lcpl (totally your name dude) here!”  That was totally pointless, your shoe display was actually quite lovely, devil nuts.

I’m sorry I inspected your room while drinking a beer.  I forgot we told you guys you couldn’t drink during Field Day.

Lastly, I would like to apologize for the following, less specific offenses:

Playing lookout for Sgt Spartan while he hazed you and your roommate.
Making you field day knowing full well that Gunny told us this week was general cleanup with no inspection.
Failing you for “dust.”  Look at it as your introduction to Article 134.
Tracking dirt, mud, and rocks into your room from my boots then chewing your ass for it.
Farting in your freshly Febreze-bombed hamster cage of a room right before Sgt Sillypants came through to inspect.
Terrorizing your sleeping roommate.  I know he’s TAD and hates you for what we do.
Fucking with you the night before you went on leave.
Fucking with you the night before 72’s and 96’s.
Fucking with you in general.  It isn’t nice, and we don’t have to do it.

In closing, I would like to apologize to all future Marines that have to deal with shit head NCO’s on Field Day.  Maybe someday we can all band together and make Field Day a not-so-shitty experience for all Marines.

Love (in a begrudging, hateful way),

Your NCO, 1369, USMC

Submitted by: AAVPOG

Okinawa Prison (Part 5)

Last time I left off I was being ushered by Cpl. Asshole to Battalion SncoIc to get me documented for underage drinking. I was documented in the green book and escorted back to my barracks room to pass out like a light. After I passed out at around 1200 I was awakened again at 0400 with kicks to the door and ordered to get in green on green, glowbelt and camelback to go out side for a PT run. We all got ready and went to the parking lot to form it up. I was not feeling good at all. I felt like I got ran over by a truck and I was very dehydrated and in no shape to go PT. Sgt. Nazi came out like a bat out of hell and started to talk all this kind of shit to us in formation. He was talking about stuff like “you motherfuckers are given an inch and take a mile,” he would walk up and down the formation like a drill instructor and say shit like “you are a fucking disgrace, you are an embarrassment to the MarineCorps, you are this, that etc etc.” He then called us to attention and said “Right Face!!!” We all knew what was coming next. “Forwaaaaard….March!” We knew that we were in for a long run because apparently I was not the only one that got caught underage drinking that weekend.

We take off running at around 0445. It was a hot Okinawa morning and it was very humid. The humidity of Okinawa is comparable to that of Vietnam or Thailand. It is always wet. You go outside to throw the trash out and you come back covered in sweat. It is not a place for those that are out of shape. In Okinawa you are two things. You are a drunk or you are a PT stud. Reason for that is that there is a lot of down time on base. You are stuck on base, there really is not that much work to do so the games and horseplay is increased by a bit. You could either sit in the barracks and play video games, watch movies, go to church, go to the PX, try to hit on a female Marine that already has a platoon of her own, or you could get stupid drunk or you can hit the gym and try to get as big and strong as you can get. Most Marines opted for the last two. A lot of Marines were drunks and a lot of Marines were PT studs. Sgt. Nazi was a definite PT stud as he always PT’d. He never warmed up just sprinted and sprinted for miles. He ran an 18 minute PFT but he also had endurance for days and he knew how to run Marines to the ground.

We take off running and Sgt. Nazi is sprinting. I already feel like shit after the first couple of feet and I feel like throwing up. After the first mile I cannot keep up and fall out. A lot of us fell out and Sgt. Nazi would just pick us up and take us on another sprint. We ended up sprinting for 6 miles and we were in formation getting our asses chewed again. Sgt. Nazi pulled me aside and started to chew my ass. I couldn’t take it anymore and I bent over and just puked everything that was in my stomach.

After the run it was ass chewing after ass chewing from the Cpl’s to the CO. It was the same rhetoric over and over “why did you guys drink, why did you guys drink, why did you guys drink?” Over and over. It turns out that six of us got caught that weekend underage drinking. I was not the only one. That week was hell as the 1st. Sgt and the CO would PT us to the dirt and make us do fieldays every day. We also had to do midnight formations in which we had to make accountability everyday at midnight. The next weekend four Marines got caught underage drinking and even one got arrested by PMO. Our Company was in it for this time. The Colonel had enough of us and proceeded to NJP us the next Monday.

We all stood outside the Company office. After we all signed our confession statements of the crimes that we committed. We were all guilty of consuming alcohol under the age of 21. It is okay to give your life up while you are under the age of 21 but it is not okay to consume the fermented beverages. Col. Maximus was not you average looking Colonel. He was around 6 foot 6, 240 pounds and he looked like Spock from Star Trek. He was know for burning Marines to the stake and we were ordered to stand outside the Company classroom. I could hear a lot of people in the classroom as if they were waiting for something big to happen. What they were waiting for was a public NJP. It was made public to show young Marines what happens when you disobey a direct order. Colonel Maximus arrives and orders Marines in. One by one the Lcpl’s turn into PFC’s and the PFC’s turn into PVT’s. I was one of the PFC’s that was busted down to private. I was ordered in and all the Marines from two companies were there to watch. I stepped in front of the Colonel and he followed to read my statement and accused me of the crime. He then proceeded to take my rank, my pay, and order me to 60 days restrictions with extra duties. We all stood outside the classroom and took our ranks off. I game my chevrons to the newly busted down PFC. As we all stood there we wondered how bad it was going to get. We had restriction to follow and we also had bullshit from our Company to put up with. It was going to get bad and it was just the tip of the ice berg.

Stay tuned for part 6

Submitted by: free_bird

Saved by An Act of Dumbassity

I was an AAV mechanic from 02-06.  Two years on Okinawa and one in the Stumps.  When I left the island they sent me stateside a month early because my next unit was supposed to be gearing up to deploy, but when I got there plans had been changed and they were getting ready to go to the Rock for “6” months and decided it would be better for me to stay in the Marine Corps’s sandy asshole to attend Corporal’s Course, which I understood seeing as how I was promoted to Cpl the day before I left Japan.

I never got to attend Corporal’s Course even after numerous attempts to get the rear-party CO (LT) to permit it.  My CWO, SNCOs, and Sgts all seemed to think it was the perfect time but according to the LT we wouldn’t have enough Marines to stand Duty at the barracks, so it would be better to wait until we got a couple more Corporals.  We didn’t.  We got five new guys from School Bn, one of whom was a Private with a severe alcohol problem and was basically waiting to get separated out.  Three Corporals meant barracks duty twice a week in addition to moto PT (MWF) and our actual jobs all while babysitting the dozen or so guys that were getting kicked out for various reasons and getting multiple ass chewings every day about our inability to micromanage the lives of these grown men.

The breaking point in my mind came a while after one of the guys awaiting his separation got caught doing something when it was drunk out and that LT lost his damned mind.  I am not exaggerating when I say he put us into full lock-down mode.  No civilian attire, field day every day for a week (until the Staff on Oki put an end to it when they found out he wasn’t even showing up to the inspections), uniform inspections, classes on alcohol and drug abuse, those goddamned formations at 2200 just to make sure everyone is there, and making us, no shit, recording in the green Duty Log when Marines entered and exited the lounge, duty hut, laundry room, and when they left and returned to their rooms.  There really is an official green duty log somewhere on file in the Stumps full of shit like, “2357 – Cpl XXXXXXX left the lounge, returned to his room to prepare for sleep,” “0423 – DNCO leaves Duty Hut to uirnate,” “0425 – DNCO returns to Duty Hut from urinating.”  This kind of ridiculous mass-punishment did no one any good at all.  Morale dropped noticeably by the day.

A few months later the LT seemed to be trying to make up for it by having a forced fun day at Six Flags, where absolutely no one wanted to waste their Saturday.  Some would think that your unit cannot “force” you to spend your cash on a ticket to an amusement park, but you would be wrong (try telling those fuckers you have no desire to attend the ball and watch them eye-fuck your soul before they lose their mind all over your face).  Going was almost better than the alternative, as that was going into work and completing the Financial Management MCI (yes, of course even if you’ve turned it in years ago)…because if you don’t want to go to Six Flags or don’t have the money to go, you obviously need to reevaluate your life, Devil Dog.  None of the Staff seemed to be able to do anything.  They obviously gave a shit because they were in constant communication with the guys on deployment, but they often said there was nothing they could do other than put up with it until the company made its glorious return.  We didn’t count on the separating guys to accidentally save us.

My Duty Hut smelled bad, like someone over-nuked a pile of frozen garlic bread.  It made me a little hungry so I asked the Duty Pfc to post for a few so I could drop a deuce and microwave us some burritos.  When I returned there was another DNCO grilling my DPfc about the stink, so we get to shooting the shit about how goddamned awful Twentynine is and fucking Comm School boots blah blah fuck Duty blah and he stops out of nowhere and laughs a little then says, “This is stupid, but one of my Marines says he smelled some weed.”  We both laughed a hearty “no fucking way” laugh and decided that from our combined pre-Marine Corps experience, that there was no way what we were smelling was good ole cannabis, shot a few more minutes worth of shit and he went away.

A short amount of moments passed and I was standing in the doorway of the lounge passively watching Wonder Showzen when the OOD popped in to do what OOD’s do when they are bored; check on the DNCO’s.  Reported all secure and all that happy horseshit and he, too, goes away, so I focus my attention back to my thoughts of freedom.  Within minutes he returns with the Duty from upstairs, whom looks completely horrified.  He interrupts the Magic Duty Dance immediately after he cuts his return salute and I’m mid sentence with, “Do you smell that?”

Completely confused for that excruciatingly long half-second, I respond with, “The burritos, sir?”

“No.  Pot,” he fires back.

“I believe it smelled like burnt garlic bread earlier, sir.  I don’t think we smelled any pot, though.”

The upstairs Duty’s next statement cloned my own, as did my DPfc’s, which of course, led to a round of questioning mostly pertaining to how we would have any idea what marijuana smelled like if we were active duty Marines.  Professionalism died a little that day as a silver bar, two Corporals, and a PFC laughing like drunk hyenas.  All of us casually agreed that whatever it was, it was definitely not marijuana.  However, he believed that we should post our DPfc’s and tour with him for Integrity’s sake.

If you have been up at 0anything on a Saturday when the OOD shows up, you know that if you are caught existing you will probably be snatched up for a quick police call or some other dumb shit.  Of course, almost no one would answer their door.  They must have either been passed out or off base, sir (chuckles).  The few that do answer are either boots that don’t know any better or smart terminals that crack their door with an open beer and a shit eating grin.

Unfortunately, one of our separating Marines temporarily blacked out that portion of the brain that tells you not to do something obviously stupid and he was outside of his room smoking a cigarette.  No big deal, “hey Devil, smoke pit.”  “Aye, Corporal.”  Thus was not the case this time around.  Had he shut his door, he would have never been caught and we would have been fucked for many more weeks until our company returned.

As he is walking away towards the smoke pit, the OOD catches a whiff of that burnt garlic bread stink and realizes where it was coming from:  This smoking Marine’s room.  He calls ole boy back over to us and asks him what he’s cooking.  Poor guy looked so confused it was almost a confession.  I tried to butt in with, “Is that garlic bread?” while the other Duty does the same as we both realize where this could go and how badly it could go for all of us if it turned out this dude had actually been stupid enough to burn weed in the barracks.  He told the OOD that he had been nuking some leftovers from the night before, and even pulled out some smelly ass, garlic-heavy shit from How-How’s (I think that was the name of the place) from the trash.  Waves of “holyfuckingshitthatwasclose” washed over us as the OOD laughed it off and allowed us to keep Dutying it up on our own.  For a while.

An hour later PMO rolls up with a fucking K9.  I don’t know the details because I’ve been told everything from the OOD causally joking about it and someone overreacting to some random visiting girlfriend calling PMO from her cell in one of the rooms, but somehow they got involved and shit got real.  Fast.

Unwritten SOP was that if PMO ever pulls into the barracks, you get that SDO on the phone and to the barracks NOW.  DPfc knew this and was frantically punching numbers and screaming at the SDO’s Dpfc to “get him the fuck down here PMO!  PMO! K9’s!  Shits going down, son!” as I was greeting the OOD (of course, without the ‘all secure,’ shit was obviously not secure) and Sgt. 5-0 and his buddy Cpl. K9.  Shit was halted on the spot until SDO pulled in ready to rip souls from bodies.  Doors were assaulted with fists and voices, then more intelligently, the correct keys, until every Marine in the building was made aware of the search.  Door to door they sniffed, starting on the bottom deck.  They only made it through a few rooms before that puppy signaled Cpl K9 that he smelled some of that sweet, sweet plant material.  Wall lockers were opened, cabinets were thrown open and emptied, drawers pulled out, and general chaos was unleashed upon this poor guy’s room.  And the didn’t find shit.  PMO take off, OOD tours by himself for a few minutes, and the SDO and I are talking to the Marine who’s room was destroyed.

I can’t say that I was close to this guy or even that I was a good friend of his.  I can say that even if his heart wasn’t in the Marine Corps anymore, he was still one hell of a great guy to be around.  He was that ultra-laid back dude in your unit that never lost his shit because he didn’t seem to have one to give in the first place.  He knew that the civilian world could be just as bad, if not worse, than life in the Corps because he had been there, so he never really complained much no matter how bad shit got.  That day, though, proved to be too much.

Once the OOD and PMO were out of earshot, he looked the SDO in the eye and told him that he had just smoked a little joint in the bathroom right before they rolled in.  His deadpan expression made this at first seem like a joke, but he didn’t laugh.  No one laughed.  We followed him to the head where he pulled out a small metal ashtray with the tiniest joint roach I have ever seen perched on one of the corners.  This guy was already getting separated and didn’t have to tell on himself, but he did.  I don’t know if he wanted to help facilitate his early release, to get out of going to the field that next week, add time on from the new paperwork that would have to be filled out, if he internally lost it for a few moments, or if he had a very interesting take on integrity.

If he would have told me, I don’t know if I would have turned him in, and I think he knew that.  He knew I had a bit of disdain for the guys that were getting kicked out, as well as a good amount of apathy.  I think that is why he told the SDO, so that he would be forced to follow through with procedure.  The SDO wasn’t really all that mad, though.  He seemed to be amused by the fact that the K9 couldn’t find a roach and impressed by the guy’s honesty, albeit maybe a bit misplaced given his situation.  As it would turn out, that situation saved us a lot of hassle over the next few weeks.

We couldn’t be locked down any harder than we already were, so there really wasn’t anything further the LT could do to us as punishment for allowing one of his Marines to momentarily exercise free will.  It didn’t matter, though.  Enlisted men sometimes speak in hushed tones of a mystical act of nature referred to as “relieved of command.”  It is not known to me if this is truly what happened to our temporary commander, or if he let the CWO and staff take over while he disappeared into his hobbit hole (or whatever officers live in.)  Life quickly got exponentially better for a while.

This of course led to company-wide piss tests.  I don’t know if it is true but I was told even the Marines ACROSS THE FUCKING OCEAN had to drop trou and push a few drops out as well.  Yes, there were more NJP’s.

The extreme knee-jerk reactions are what killed the last of my will to reenlist.  Okinawa was bad enough with their Liberty Cards, ORM worksheets every weekend regardless of if we left base, libo buddies and games, I was not going to be treated like a prisoner while on the very soil I was supposed to be giving my youth for.  I no longer wanted to be part of an organization that refuses to train Marines that want to be leaders by making excuses about not having enough fucking Duty NCO’s.  I no longer wanted to be part of an organization that allowed “leaders” to turn their subordinates into micromanaged slaves with absolutely no freedom simply because one of them fucked up all by himself.  I wanted no part in an organization that is so cripplingly bureaucratic that they put their most educated Marines in jobs that have nothing to do with their training because “we need an NCO to fill that slot.”(like putting your Duty Expert mechanic as the Haz-Mat guy, Safety NCO, SACO, etc.)  I couldn’t stand the thought of staying in an organization that doesn’t allow individuals that are detrimental to morale and safety to get the fuck out and allow our units to train, evolve, and function properly without having to allot hours for full-time adult baby-sitting personnel.  When the reenlistment man came a-knockin’ on my door, he already knew better than to hand me a package and had a beer with me instead.

Submitted by: AAVPOG

My worst experience in the MC was training.

I have to say by far my worst experience was in the Marine Corps was the training. All the way from basic to my job school, after that it was pretty chill once I hit the fleet but still had to deal with some stupid bullshit. I still have nightmares about my horrible experience at boot camp at the hands of other recruits, all because I got dropped for an injury and had to pick up with another platoon halfway through. From the first day I was bullied and later got jumped in the shower room after they wanted to “talk” because I didn’t get tasks done fast enough, after that me and others who had picked up with me (they experienced the same things I did) and did everything in our power to get the platoon fucked up on purpose until the drill instructors caught on to what we were doing and left us alone. At the end I personally told the ones I hated most that I hoped that if I ever saw them again they would pay.

At MCT I got my chance, while there one of the assholes that was in my basic platoon was in the same unit I was. I mostly avoided him the whole time but on the last hump he found me and started the same bullshit trying to bully me, I was too busy helping my friends to grind on to pay any attention to him. However on the cool down march the way back to the barracks he started making fun of the fact I was tired (who wasn’t after so many miles?). Finally I had had enough and unslung my rifle from my shoulder and slammed my rifle butt into his face knocking his ass to the ground, not caring who saw it. I was just happy with the fact I got my revenge but the best part was my sergeant saw and heard the whole thing. He separated us and told the other guy to pick himself up and that was the end of it. No NJP, no repercussions and I never saw that prick again but man it felt good!

Submitted by: TP

Sergeant King. The pride of my unit. The man who murdered his own son.

We’re coming up on the anniversary of the day that my first NCO in the fleet was arrested for killing his two month old son by crushing his skull. It was obviously the kid’s fault, he wouldn’t stop crying when the guy was playing video games.

The funny thing is that this motivator was the pride of my unit. He embodied everything I hate about the Marine Corps. He didn’t know the most basic fundamentals of his job, only maintained a fist class PFT because his best friend was the company clerk, and he loved to get drunk and beat on his wife, or one of us if we were in the wrong place at the wrong time.

But the higher ups of my unit held him up as an example of a truly great Marine because he sucked miles of dicks, and loved to stab anyone and everyone in the back in front of whoever was of higher rank. He was meritoriously promoted, and had the highest pros and cons in the platoon.

Fuck you Sergeant King, burn in hell you piece of shit.

original

Submitted by: freeatlastfreeatlast

Why I didn’t join the Marine Corps.

Now, I know what you might be thinking. “Oh, here we go with another Air Force elitist.” But alas, that is not the case. I hold no discrimination specifically against the Marine Corps, actually. I hate all of the branches equally. With that said, let me help put into perspective my experiences when it came to joining the Marine Corps, and why I quit.

Growing up, I loved war movies. After watching them I would always get so inspired to go and fight for my country. I would go and do research on the Marine Corps and the Army for hours on end. Finding out about how to join, what the jobs were, and pretty much everything I could find. The most recent of which, was after I had gone on an 81 mile march with some marines in honor of the (approximately) 81 marines who died in the second battle of Fallujah. One of the marines who joined us during this walk was a marine who had been in for around 29 years. After going on this adventure, it was the thing that finally got me serious about talking to a recruiter in joining the military. Initially, actually, I had gone to the National Guard recruiter and scheduled a meeting with an Air Force recruiter, but after requesting information online for the Marine Corps, they had contacted me and had me come into the recruiting station to meet with me. After that… I was hooked.

I started going through the process, my recruiter being extremely helpful and understanding, making sure that I had all of the requirements needed in order to join the Marine Corps. Now, when we had gotten to allergies, I thought I told him that I think I’m allergic to cats. After telling him this, we stepped outside and he told me that I will have to put that on certain documentation and that it could lead to me being disqualified. He talked about how he had never seen a cat in all of his 10+ years of being in the Marine Corps, and the chance of me seeing one would be slim to none, so I had the choice to not say anything about it if I didn’t want to. If I did this however, I would have to make sure that I was consistent in saying this with telling my senior recruiter, MEPS, and the documentation. I took his advice, under the impression that he was thinking about my best interest, when in reality he just wanted to make sure he didn’t lose another potential recruit. Although it can be argued that he didn’t want something small like that to stop me from “living my dream” of being a marine, it was later on in and after the enlistment process that I found out what my recruiter was really like as a person.

After finishing up everything at MEPS, I had become a poolee. Now, later on in being in the DEP, I had decided that I wanted to go Active Duty. After telling my recruiter this, he pretty much just laughed at me. Although I was passing my IST, I wasn’t getting 20 pull-ups or 9 minute run times, which apparently was his standard for what anyone going Infantry should have. At PT (which we have 4 times throughout the week) he would mock me for my scores not being as high as he wanted them to be. “And you want to be  infantry?” He would say. In addition to this, he, along with the other recruiters, would humiliate me along with any of the other poolees whenever they could. Claiming that they were doing this to prepare us for boot camp, it was not what we needed. They would try to trick me into a joke, and if I didn’t take the bait and ignored them they would just mock me even more. I know that it’s worse actually being in, but I was not a marine. I was a poolee. They told us to completely trust them, after making some kind of joke about how we were stupid or something of that sort.

One time, a week before a Pool function (and Winter break) I had gotten sick. It was only a cold, but nevertheless I was sick. I had actually gotten sick from another poolee. I knew that people were shipping soon, so I told my recruiter that I didn’t want to go to the pool function because I knew there was no way I was going to be able to do the IST in this condition. He told me to just suck it up, once again mocking me for the fact that I wanted to be infantry. I knew that if I was in a situation, such as a combat situation where if I would have to fight, I would, but I didn’t want to risk the poolees shipping soon to get sick. I ended up showing up for 15 minutes to sign the paper to show that I signed up, then went back home to get some sleep. Not only that, but literally the night before I had found this website, and after reading articles all night, was extremely unmotivated to do anything involving the Marine Corps at the time. The next time I was at the station for PT, I explained to him that I did not want to get the other poolees sick, and that is the main reason why I did not show up that day. He then told me that he did not care if I had gotten the other poolees sick, as long as I showed up.

It was then, that I realized he did not have our interests or safety in mind whatsoever. He was only interested in what he could benefit from.

This, in concordance with what I had found out about many of the NCOs in the Marine Corps, I found out that my recruiter was another one of the sergeants that would treat their junior enlisted horribly and for no good reason. I’m not saying I found out any  information about his past to confirm this, but his personality fit the profile perfectly.

After signing my contract, I had to go and meet the “Commanding Officer” or whoever at the reserve station I would have been serving at. In meeting him, I learned more about the current situation with the Marine Corps than I did from any of the recruiters. You know how recruiters will tell you that you can go reserve, and then switch to active duty if you want to? Technically this is true. But the CO made it very clear to me. “If you are going in as a reservist initially, there is an extremely small chance that you will ever be an active duty marine. It just makes no sense for us to pay for an older marine with little actual training or experience to become an active duty marine when we can just get a new,  stronger person to come in initially as an active duty marine and fill that spot anyway.” Is what he said to me. Although I knew that recruiters would bend the truth to get me to believe things, this was a real life example that affirmed it for me.

So, after all of these experiences, my recruiters mocked me, lied to me, and showed that they didn’t care about me or any of the other poolees as long as we became their meal ticket.

This entire experience along with what I saw from the articles on this website showed that this was not the right place for me. Not only that, but I realized that the military in itself is a deception. We are constantly bombarded with shows, movies, news, etc. about how great our military is, but once you get into the roots of it, you find out how corrupt it is.

This has nothing to do with the fact that I wouldn’t fight. If there is a war and I truly believe in the cause of one of the sides, I would gladly fight. But to do so with an organization that is going to constantly tear me down and punish me unless I conform to the rigged system would be against everything I believe in.

I wanted to be the marine that I saw on TV, not the kind of marine I would actually become going into the Marine Corps.

In conclusion, if you are thinking about joining the Marine Corps, please take great consideration into what it’s actually about. You will be fighting for your country, but will you be fighting for the right reasons? Because you will get no say in the matter. Wherever the guys in the suits in ties who sleep comfortably in their nice suburban homes/small mansions will be the ones who decide who you fight and why. Not you. Amongst many other things, which this site brings to light.

Although these weren’t the only reasons I decided to do something different, they were strong motivators to run away as fast as possible.

If you are doing this because you need a job, or you need an education, or anything like that… Please don’t do it. Do what makes you happy in life. Even if it means you won’t make a lot of money, or won’t get an education (Not saying you would make a lot of money in the Marine Corps… you know what I mean).

Please be careful with this decision. You are risking 4-8 of your best years on this decision. Making the wrong one could mean dealing with regret for the rest of your life.

Submitted by: Home Alone

Marines like to hurt each other more than their enemies

Today we would like to demonstrate typical behavior of marines when they are off duty. They get drunk and hurt each other, usually the weaker ones. Some may make the excuse that this “builds character”, or that it “makes you stronger”. That is bullshit.

What this does is piss someone off and make them resent you. Do you think the ones getting picked on will be just as likely to take a bullet for their bullies than their friends? This is not teamwork. This is not a team. This is a mess.

All that behavior like this does is reinforce the popular notion that “Enlisted marines are supposed to be scoundrels. That’s why you get a medal if you stay out of trouble for 3 years” (as my former LT once told me). Frankly, if the marine corps wants to be known as a safe haven for children who can’t control their adolescent impulses, who lack any semblance of self-control, self-restraint, or self-discipline, and who joined because they couldn’t make it anywhere else, then the marine corps is doing just fine. But if the marine corps wants to be known as an elite and highly professional fighting force, then it has a long way to go. – S_The_Mod and NINJA_PUNCH

The Life of a Marine Corps Recruiter Part 1

So, currently a Marine Corps Recruiter and hating life very badly. Can anyone please explain to me why I would want, or even try, to enlist a kid at 2 in the morning pushing carts in a parking lot? No clue. But apparently he’s right what we need according to my SNCOIC. Also I by no means understand the leadership values out here. So you’re telling me if somebody has a 300 PFT that gives them that much more of an intelligence factor to lead. Nope it doesn’t but it sure helps them get meritorious SSgt doesn’t it. Feel bad for those young Marines who inherit him as a SNCO. I guess that’s what happens when your Sgt Maj is a cat 4 (asvab failure with waiver to enlist the one who says war dog and hard charge 25 times in a PME) it’s whatever though he has a wall of Marine Corps shit on display which gives him super powers after he tells you about his second tour on the drill field. Then comes the fun part not frauding a kid in or telling them to lie. You tell the friends of them to tell them to lie so really I guess it should be more of the creative part. Then on to Meps to tell the docs everything or shut up. 50/50 chance here lets hope we win if not on to the next number. Key to recruiting deny, deny, deny, and lots churching things to a point it actually sounds good to you. 8412s lead the way and stay at home for 16 years of the Marine Corps career good for them way to claim the title with no deployments. Well have a good one saw some kids smoking weed on the corner better go talk to them. 

Submitted by:  2807aListofLies

Things that are wrong with the Marine Corps. The Master List.

things that are wrong with marine corps master list

Behold! The master list of everything that is wrong with the Marine Corps. We will take in all feedback and continue to build on this list over time. Keep in mind, that some of the things on this list are there for comedic purposes.”

Also, most of these actually pertain to DoD in general, and not just the MC.

Without further delay, here is the current list:

  1. Over-indulgence in esprit de corps: We spend so much effort congratulating ourselves for being Marines, but too little on asking how to ensure that distinction matters. We have this attitude of “I’m a Marine, I made it” as opposed to “How good can I possibly be? Am I what my country needs today and tomorrow?” Spoiler alert: country doesn’t need 18 year olds with rifles to storm beaches. We BADLY need a lightweight, amphibious raid force from the sea, usually operating at company level and below.
  2. Field Days: The idea of a married SNCO that doesn’t have to live with this bullshit coming into my room and telling me it’s unsat.
  3. MCIs: Seriously, has anyone ever taken one of these classes and not cheated? I once went to my Company Clerk and asked him how to get a proctor for an MCI Test because I wanted to do it legitimately, and he just looked at me with this dumbfounded stare for a few seconds before telling me that he had no idea how to do it and I should just cheat like everyone else. Unless your future college accepts MCIs for credit, they’re practically useless.
  4. Mandatory Fun Days: Nothing says “building camaraderie” quite like being forced to spend even MORE time with the same people that you work with and live with on a daily basis; and then getting chewed out by some NCO or SNCO because your belt (in your civilian clothes no less) extends past the buckle to the right, instead of to the left.
  5. Pro/Con Marks: I swear, no one in the entire marine corps knows how to properly rate their marines’ Proficiency and Conduct Marks. So, even though there are a pair of very simple charts that tell NCOs and SNCOs what ratings to assign, the whole process devolves into a popularity contest.
  6. Fitreps: Pretty much the only way to get promoted past the rank of Sgt is to make sure you have a Fitness Report that sparkles like a diamond. Unfortunately, that usually means being adept in finding ways to take the credit for your unit’s successes while shifting the blame for failures onto your subordinates. Then these same SNCO’s have the guile to talk about their “superior leadership abilities”.
  7. Illiteracy of SNCOs.
  8. Illiteracy of fucking everyone.
  9. Decreasing standards just to make people pass schools. 
  10. Professional reading list. 
  11. The prevalent sexism. “Hurr durr, she sucked dick to get promoted.” C’mon. It’s the 21st century. Grow up.
  12. The prevalent preferential sexism/racism 2.0. Don’t tell me you haven’t seen it. The platonic guy friend SNCOs with new female boots. The fucking homeboy back in the hood homeboys in the supply building. This shit has no place in the Corps.
  13. The eagerness to counsel and punish when someone fucks up and then turning a blind eye when someone does something good. It is meant to be an equal system. Want to counsel someone for a fuckup? That’s fine. Just don’t exclusively use the system for punishment. It’s meant to be used for both or not at all.
  14.  Mass punishments: Because if a marine goes off base, gets drunk and assaults a cab driver, it’s somehow my fault for not knowing that he was going to do that and preventing him.
  15. 15 minutes prior to 15 minutes prior to 15 minutes prior… : Everyone in the marine corps likes to say “You’re a grown man” yet they don’t even trust a marine with something as simple as being to work on time.
  16. Armorers and the armory in general. Fuck everyone and everything about it. I’ve never seen an armorer that wasn’t on BCP. Don’t even get butthurt about this one. Just shut the fuck up, sit down, and admit it.
  17. Chucks on Friday and pretty much everyone this last Commandant did.
  18. TA getting cut. The congress got a raise and our TA got cut. Just another public embarrassment. Applies to all branches.
  19. Receiving NJP because of an incident that happened off base somehow doesn’t qualify as double jeopardy.
  20. Imminent danger zone pay getting pro-rated by day. Just another way to nickel-and-dime the very people that volunteer for these bullshit deployments anyway. At least fucking pay us.
  21. SNCOs that were nowhere near the shooting at Camp Bastion on Sep 15, 2012 nominating themselves for CARs and NAMs. You guys know who you are.
  22. Junior enlisted marriages. We essentially bribe 19 year old kids (who are modestly paid and frequently away) to get married…GTFO the barracks + pay doubles + girlfriend from back home lives with you. It’s hard to say no. The marriages are generally badly matched between people too immature for the responsibility, finances are tight, babies are had, so the now Corporal with a toddler has to choose between EAS + uncertainty, or re-up and guaranteed paycheck. This logic is the start of many career guys’ decision to stick around…instead of retaining our best, we retain those who gave in to temptation and accepted the marriage bribe. As a result, our cream doesn’t rise to the top…the guys who need the job security rise to the top. Once there, they make shit decisions and make poisonous command climates, which perpetuates the cycle.
  23. Manpower Assignments. Our system makes the assumption that central manpower managers make better decisions for the individual and the service than individuals can do. As a result, getting the right guy in the right billet is a matter of chance.

To be continued… If you have any ideas to add to or modify this list, please leave them in the comment section below.

Source