Okinawa Prison (Part 5)

Last time I left off I was being ushered by Cpl. Asshole to Battalion SncoIc to get me documented for underage drinking. I was documented in the green book and escorted back to my barracks room to pass out like a light. After I passed out at around 1200 I was awakened again at 0400 with kicks to the door and ordered to get in green on green, glowbelt and camelback to go out side for a PT run. We all got ready and went to the parking lot to form it up. I was not feeling good at all. I felt like I got ran over by a truck and I was very dehydrated and in no shape to go PT. Sgt. Nazi came out like a bat out of hell and started to talk all this kind of shit to us in formation. He was talking about stuff like “you motherfuckers are given an inch and take a mile,” he would walk up and down the formation like a drill instructor and say shit like “you are a fucking disgrace, you are an embarrassment to the MarineCorps, you are this, that etc etc.” He then called us to attention and said “Right Face!!!” We all knew what was coming next. “Forwaaaaard….March!” We knew that we were in for a long run because apparently I was not the only one that got caught underage drinking that weekend.

We take off running at around 0445. It was a hot Okinawa morning and it was very humid. The humidity of Okinawa is comparable to that of Vietnam or Thailand. It is always wet. You go outside to throw the trash out and you come back covered in sweat. It is not a place for those that are out of shape. In Okinawa you are two things. You are a drunk or you are a PT stud. Reason for that is that there is a lot of down time on base. You are stuck on base, there really is not that much work to do so the games and horseplay is increased by a bit. You could either sit in the barracks and play video games, watch movies, go to church, go to the PX, try to hit on a female Marine that already has a platoon of her own, or you could get stupid drunk or you can hit the gym and try to get as big and strong as you can get. Most Marines opted for the last two. A lot of Marines were drunks and a lot of Marines were PT studs. Sgt. Nazi was a definite PT stud as he always PT’d. He never warmed up just sprinted and sprinted for miles. He ran an 18 minute PFT but he also had endurance for days and he knew how to run Marines to the ground.

We take off running and Sgt. Nazi is sprinting. I already feel like shit after the first couple of feet and I feel like throwing up. After the first mile I cannot keep up and fall out. A lot of us fell out and Sgt. Nazi would just pick us up and take us on another sprint. We ended up sprinting for 6 miles and we were in formation getting our asses chewed again. Sgt. Nazi pulled me aside and started to chew my ass. I couldn’t take it anymore and I bent over and just puked everything that was in my stomach.

After the run it was ass chewing after ass chewing from the Cpl’s to the CO. It was the same rhetoric over and over “why did you guys drink, why did you guys drink, why did you guys drink?” Over and over. It turns out that six of us got caught that weekend underage drinking. I was not the only one. That week was hell as the 1st. Sgt and the CO would PT us to the dirt and make us do fieldays every day. We also had to do midnight formations in which we had to make accountability everyday at midnight. The next weekend four Marines got caught underage drinking and even one got arrested by PMO. Our Company was in it for this time. The Colonel had enough of us and proceeded to NJP us the next Monday.

We all stood outside the Company office. After we all signed our confession statements of the crimes that we committed. We were all guilty of consuming alcohol under the age of 21. It is okay to give your life up while you are under the age of 21 but it is not okay to consume the fermented beverages. Col. Maximus was not you average looking Colonel. He was around 6 foot 6, 240 pounds and he looked like Spock from Star Trek. He was know for burning Marines to the stake and we were ordered to stand outside the Company classroom. I could hear a lot of people in the classroom as if they were waiting for something big to happen. What they were waiting for was a public NJP. It was made public to show young Marines what happens when you disobey a direct order. Colonel Maximus arrives and orders Marines in. One by one the Lcpl’s turn into PFC’s and the PFC’s turn into PVT’s. I was one of the PFC’s that was busted down to private. I was ordered in and all the Marines from two companies were there to watch. I stepped in front of the Colonel and he followed to read my statement and accused me of the crime. He then proceeded to take my rank, my pay, and order me to 60 days restrictions with extra duties. We all stood outside the classroom and took our ranks off. I game my chevrons to the newly busted down PFC. As we all stood there we wondered how bad it was going to get. We had restriction to follow and we also had bullshit from our Company to put up with. It was going to get bad and it was just the tip of the ice berg.

Stay tuned for part 6

Submitted by: free_bird

Saved by An Act of Dumbassity

I was an AAV mechanic from 02-06.  Two years on Okinawa and one in the Stumps.  When I left the island they sent me stateside a month early because my next unit was supposed to be gearing up to deploy, but when I got there plans had been changed and they were getting ready to go to the Rock for “6” months and decided it would be better for me to stay in the Marine Corps’s sandy asshole to attend Corporal’s Course, which I understood seeing as how I was promoted to Cpl the day before I left Japan.

I never got to attend Corporal’s Course even after numerous attempts to get the rear-party CO (LT) to permit it.  My CWO, SNCOs, and Sgts all seemed to think it was the perfect time but according to the LT we wouldn’t have enough Marines to stand Duty at the barracks, so it would be better to wait until we got a couple more Corporals.  We didn’t.  We got five new guys from School Bn, one of whom was a Private with a severe alcohol problem and was basically waiting to get separated out.  Three Corporals meant barracks duty twice a week in addition to moto PT (MWF) and our actual jobs all while babysitting the dozen or so guys that were getting kicked out for various reasons and getting multiple ass chewings every day about our inability to micromanage the lives of these grown men.

The breaking point in my mind came a while after one of the guys awaiting his separation got caught doing something when it was drunk out and that LT lost his damned mind.  I am not exaggerating when I say he put us into full lock-down mode.  No civilian attire, field day every day for a week (until the Staff on Oki put an end to it when they found out he wasn’t even showing up to the inspections), uniform inspections, classes on alcohol and drug abuse, those goddamned formations at 2200 just to make sure everyone is there, and making us, no shit, recording in the green Duty Log when Marines entered and exited the lounge, duty hut, laundry room, and when they left and returned to their rooms.  There really is an official green duty log somewhere on file in the Stumps full of shit like, “2357 – Cpl XXXXXXX left the lounge, returned to his room to prepare for sleep,” “0423 – DNCO leaves Duty Hut to uirnate,” “0425 – DNCO returns to Duty Hut from urinating.”  This kind of ridiculous mass-punishment did no one any good at all.  Morale dropped noticeably by the day.

A few months later the LT seemed to be trying to make up for it by having a forced fun day at Six Flags, where absolutely no one wanted to waste their Saturday.  Some would think that your unit cannot “force” you to spend your cash on a ticket to an amusement park, but you would be wrong (try telling those fuckers you have no desire to attend the ball and watch them eye-fuck your soul before they lose their mind all over your face).  Going was almost better than the alternative, as that was going into work and completing the Financial Management MCI (yes, of course even if you’ve turned it in years ago)…because if you don’t want to go to Six Flags or don’t have the money to go, you obviously need to reevaluate your life, Devil Dog.  None of the Staff seemed to be able to do anything.  They obviously gave a shit because they were in constant communication with the guys on deployment, but they often said there was nothing they could do other than put up with it until the company made its glorious return.  We didn’t count on the separating guys to accidentally save us.

My Duty Hut smelled bad, like someone over-nuked a pile of frozen garlic bread.  It made me a little hungry so I asked the Duty Pfc to post for a few so I could drop a deuce and microwave us some burritos.  When I returned there was another DNCO grilling my DPfc about the stink, so we get to shooting the shit about how goddamned awful Twentynine is and fucking Comm School boots blah blah fuck Duty blah and he stops out of nowhere and laughs a little then says, “This is stupid, but one of my Marines says he smelled some weed.”  We both laughed a hearty “no fucking way” laugh and decided that from our combined pre-Marine Corps experience, that there was no way what we were smelling was good ole cannabis, shot a few more minutes worth of shit and he went away.

A short amount of moments passed and I was standing in the doorway of the lounge passively watching Wonder Showzen when the OOD popped in to do what OOD’s do when they are bored; check on the DNCO’s.  Reported all secure and all that happy horseshit and he, too, goes away, so I focus my attention back to my thoughts of freedom.  Within minutes he returns with the Duty from upstairs, whom looks completely horrified.  He interrupts the Magic Duty Dance immediately after he cuts his return salute and I’m mid sentence with, “Do you smell that?”

Completely confused for that excruciatingly long half-second, I respond with, “The burritos, sir?”

“No.  Pot,” he fires back.

“I believe it smelled like burnt garlic bread earlier, sir.  I don’t think we smelled any pot, though.”

The upstairs Duty’s next statement cloned my own, as did my DPfc’s, which of course, led to a round of questioning mostly pertaining to how we would have any idea what marijuana smelled like if we were active duty Marines.  Professionalism died a little that day as a silver bar, two Corporals, and a PFC laughing like drunk hyenas.  All of us casually agreed that whatever it was, it was definitely not marijuana.  However, he believed that we should post our DPfc’s and tour with him for Integrity’s sake.

If you have been up at 0anything on a Saturday when the OOD shows up, you know that if you are caught existing you will probably be snatched up for a quick police call or some other dumb shit.  Of course, almost no one would answer their door.  They must have either been passed out or off base, sir (chuckles).  The few that do answer are either boots that don’t know any better or smart terminals that crack their door with an open beer and a shit eating grin.

Unfortunately, one of our separating Marines temporarily blacked out that portion of the brain that tells you not to do something obviously stupid and he was outside of his room smoking a cigarette.  No big deal, “hey Devil, smoke pit.”  “Aye, Corporal.”  Thus was not the case this time around.  Had he shut his door, he would have never been caught and we would have been fucked for many more weeks until our company returned.

As he is walking away towards the smoke pit, the OOD catches a whiff of that burnt garlic bread stink and realizes where it was coming from:  This smoking Marine’s room.  He calls ole boy back over to us and asks him what he’s cooking.  Poor guy looked so confused it was almost a confession.  I tried to butt in with, “Is that garlic bread?” while the other Duty does the same as we both realize where this could go and how badly it could go for all of us if it turned out this dude had actually been stupid enough to burn weed in the barracks.  He told the OOD that he had been nuking some leftovers from the night before, and even pulled out some smelly ass, garlic-heavy shit from How-How’s (I think that was the name of the place) from the trash.  Waves of “holyfuckingshitthatwasclose” washed over us as the OOD laughed it off and allowed us to keep Dutying it up on our own.  For a while.

An hour later PMO rolls up with a fucking K9.  I don’t know the details because I’ve been told everything from the OOD causally joking about it and someone overreacting to some random visiting girlfriend calling PMO from her cell in one of the rooms, but somehow they got involved and shit got real.  Fast.

Unwritten SOP was that if PMO ever pulls into the barracks, you get that SDO on the phone and to the barracks NOW.  DPfc knew this and was frantically punching numbers and screaming at the SDO’s Dpfc to “get him the fuck down here PMO!  PMO! K9’s!  Shits going down, son!” as I was greeting the OOD (of course, without the ‘all secure,’ shit was obviously not secure) and Sgt. 5-0 and his buddy Cpl. K9.  Shit was halted on the spot until SDO pulled in ready to rip souls from bodies.  Doors were assaulted with fists and voices, then more intelligently, the correct keys, until every Marine in the building was made aware of the search.  Door to door they sniffed, starting on the bottom deck.  They only made it through a few rooms before that puppy signaled Cpl K9 that he smelled some of that sweet, sweet plant material.  Wall lockers were opened, cabinets were thrown open and emptied, drawers pulled out, and general chaos was unleashed upon this poor guy’s room.  And the didn’t find shit.  PMO take off, OOD tours by himself for a few minutes, and the SDO and I are talking to the Marine who’s room was destroyed.

I can’t say that I was close to this guy or even that I was a good friend of his.  I can say that even if his heart wasn’t in the Marine Corps anymore, he was still one hell of a great guy to be around.  He was that ultra-laid back dude in your unit that never lost his shit because he didn’t seem to have one to give in the first place.  He knew that the civilian world could be just as bad, if not worse, than life in the Corps because he had been there, so he never really complained much no matter how bad shit got.  That day, though, proved to be too much.

Once the OOD and PMO were out of earshot, he looked the SDO in the eye and told him that he had just smoked a little joint in the bathroom right before they rolled in.  His deadpan expression made this at first seem like a joke, but he didn’t laugh.  No one laughed.  We followed him to the head where he pulled out a small metal ashtray with the tiniest joint roach I have ever seen perched on one of the corners.  This guy was already getting separated and didn’t have to tell on himself, but he did.  I don’t know if he wanted to help facilitate his early release, to get out of going to the field that next week, add time on from the new paperwork that would have to be filled out, if he internally lost it for a few moments, or if he had a very interesting take on integrity.

If he would have told me, I don’t know if I would have turned him in, and I think he knew that.  He knew I had a bit of disdain for the guys that were getting kicked out, as well as a good amount of apathy.  I think that is why he told the SDO, so that he would be forced to follow through with procedure.  The SDO wasn’t really all that mad, though.  He seemed to be amused by the fact that the K9 couldn’t find a roach and impressed by the guy’s honesty, albeit maybe a bit misplaced given his situation.  As it would turn out, that situation saved us a lot of hassle over the next few weeks.

We couldn’t be locked down any harder than we already were, so there really wasn’t anything further the LT could do to us as punishment for allowing one of his Marines to momentarily exercise free will.  It didn’t matter, though.  Enlisted men sometimes speak in hushed tones of a mystical act of nature referred to as “relieved of command.”  It is not known to me if this is truly what happened to our temporary commander, or if he let the CWO and staff take over while he disappeared into his hobbit hole (or whatever officers live in.)  Life quickly got exponentially better for a while.

This of course led to company-wide piss tests.  I don’t know if it is true but I was told even the Marines ACROSS THE FUCKING OCEAN had to drop trou and push a few drops out as well.  Yes, there were more NJP’s.

The extreme knee-jerk reactions are what killed the last of my will to reenlist.  Okinawa was bad enough with their Liberty Cards, ORM worksheets every weekend regardless of if we left base, libo buddies and games, I was not going to be treated like a prisoner while on the very soil I was supposed to be giving my youth for.  I no longer wanted to be part of an organization that refuses to train Marines that want to be leaders by making excuses about not having enough fucking Duty NCO’s.  I no longer wanted to be part of an organization that allowed “leaders” to turn their subordinates into micromanaged slaves with absolutely no freedom simply because one of them fucked up all by himself.  I wanted no part in an organization that is so cripplingly bureaucratic that they put their most educated Marines in jobs that have nothing to do with their training because “we need an NCO to fill that slot.”(like putting your Duty Expert mechanic as the Haz-Mat guy, Safety NCO, SACO, etc.)  I couldn’t stand the thought of staying in an organization that doesn’t allow individuals that are detrimental to morale and safety to get the fuck out and allow our units to train, evolve, and function properly without having to allot hours for full-time adult baby-sitting personnel.  When the reenlistment man came a-knockin’ on my door, he already knew better than to hand me a package and had a beer with me instead.

Submitted by: AAVPOG

Okinawa Prison (Part 4)

Now last time I wrote about Okinawa, there were a lot of rules and implementations that had to be followed. The protocol here was a lot more strict since we were in another country and the threat condition was always in high alert. The garrison here to say the least was in full throttle and Marines would constantly get harassed for not cutting their hair on Sunday, having chipped chevrons, having Irish pennants, having a five o’clock shadow at 0500 before a PT run. Marines would even get charged if they had white socks in their boots. Marine Corps life on Okinawa was all about looks and detail and physical fitness.

 

There was also one thing in Okinawa that wasn’t really mentioned, enforced or corrected. There was a high case of RHIP (Rank Has it’s Privilege). On Okinawa if you were E-3 and below you were the equivalent of a slave that made the pyramids of Giza. If you were an NCO you were like a politician. SNCO’s were like kings and queens. And Officers were like the god’s that were worshiped. One thing that I don’t mind when following rules is when the one’s enforcing them set the example. What I do have a problem with is the one’s that are supposed to set the example do the total opposite and break the rules right in front of you, but they expect it to be okay due to the fact that they had the rank and the privilege. Don’t Marines lead by example? Does not the term “steel sharpens steel” take effect when telling Marines not to underage drink, have females in the barracks, be out past curfew?

 

In my company, the kings (NCO’s) were a handful, but a handful that knew how to use it’s power to the fullest. I’ll introduce you to them, our platoon Sergeant, lets call him Sgt. Burn, was a Marine that spent his whole career in division and knew how to fuck with Marines and punish them. The other Sergeant was Sgt. Nazi, this Sergeant was not stupid, he was quite intelligent. But like a lot of Marines wanting to show off their power, he was a burn happy Sergeant that would use his intellect to catch you doing something illegal and burn you to the stake for it (kind of like he was hoping to catch you). We had Cpl. Asshole, this Marine was a big rule breaker and he just got busted down from Sergeant for cheating on his wife and he was on a mission to burn Marines. The other three Corporals were Cpl. Lovehandles, this Corporal was a piece of work as he was a fat body that could not PT for shit, but yet he was trying to make up for his lack of fitness with being extremely anal retentive and looking for dirt in your room. And  you had Cpl. Briggs, this Marine was a true hater, a southern redneck, and a true to heart racist. And not to forget we had Cpl. DirtySanchez, this Marine was an underage NCO that would constantly underage drink and be off base past midnight constantly.

 

Rule breaking was very common in Okinawa. For example Sgt. Burn would have his Japanese girlfriend spend the nights in his barracks room constantly (that was against the rules). Sgt. Nazi would constantly be hazing his Marines and making them do stupid shit like IP their uniforms on the weekends, work through chow, he would fuck his female Marine girlfriend in the barracks (illegal) and would constantly have liquor in his room (illegal). Cpl. Asshole would put his hands on Marines when they were drunk, and he would go to other barracks of nearby companies to fuck their female Pfc’s and Lcpl’s (also illegal, something about fraternization or some shit) and he would constantly barge in junior Marine’s rooms without permission and start shit. Cpl. Lovehandles was a piece of work. This guy was fat as fuck and he would always be in trouble with the company higher ups because he would not lose weight and he looked like crap in his uniforms (not trying to sound motard, but he looked shitty) and he would fall out of every single PT run (again not leading by example). Cpl. Dirtysanchez was a 20 year old Marine that would always hang out with his best friend who was a Lclp. (again fraternization) and they would always go out in town and underage drink, stay past midnight and bring their girls back to the barracks with liquor bottles. And finally, my favorite was Cpl. Briggs, we knew to stay away from this guy, especially if you were not white (I am of Latin descent ) as he was always plotting a way to get you in trouble to burn you, not to correct you, but simply to hurt you. Especially if you were a minority.

 

One thing I noticed as I got to this shady unit was how all of the NCO’s had their preference when dealing with junior Marines. They had their little buddies. They had their little pets. If you were a woman, then automatically you were on their good side as they viewed you as someone that can give them something (sex). I noticed that all the rules of not underage drinking were being broken all the time. I would constantly see these pets (preferred juniors) drunk, and underage. I would constantly see these people partying in the pavilion and drinking with each other. I would constantly see Marines (junior and senior) jump the fence after midnight with their Japanese girlfriend’s.

 

As a little background about myself, I am of Latin descent. In my culture we like to drink from time to time. I grew up like that. When I joined the MarineCorps my alcoholism increased due to the stress and always watching people around you drinking and having fun. When I got to Okinawa I was 19 and strictly ordered not to drink. But it is hard to do especially when you see people stumbling down the hallway with a bottle of Jim Beam in one hand. It was hard to do when you would walk down the hallway and you would see Marines holding another Marine upside down while he’s drinking from a keg and everyone is shouting “chug, chug, chug!” I couldn’t take it anymore and thought to myself, “well, if he can do it, then I can do it.”

 

I was bored on one of the few days off that we had and I decided to go visit another Marine in another barracks. This Marine was of age and he pulled out a bottle of liquor and offered me a drink so that we could have a conversation heart to heart. After the bottle was finished I was tired enough to go back to my barracks room and go to sleep at around 2130. I made it up to the fourth deck, into my room, into my rack and I went to sleep.

 

Cpl. Asshole had a problem that day. I think Cpl. Asshole’s ex wife (Mrs. Asshole) gave him a wrong phone call or a wrong letter and he was hurt. Cpl. Asshole was drunk as a skunk as well and he was on a mission to destroy Marines with his wrath. Cpl. Asshole started going down the hallways drop kicking doors open to start shit with junior Marines, he would “Spartan kick” the doors wide open and make Marines that were watching T.V., playing video games, reading etc. To stop what they were doing, stand at parade rest and recite the general orders. If Marines failed to recite all of the orders they were ordered to fielday, get in their Charlies, do push ups etc.

 

My room was the last one on the deck and my room was going to eventually get kicked open and we were going to get fucked with. Now I don’t know how you guy’s react to being rudely awakened after a couple of shots of hard liquor but it is not fun. You are distorted and cannot think very well. Kind of like a bad dream. My other roommates were not in the room at the time and I was sound asleep in my bed. “BOOM!” Was the sound that I heard in my half awake, half asleep state of mind. “GET THE FUCK UP PFC!” Is what I remember hearing. I thought I was in a bad dream and could not properly respond to a stranger in the dark. “STAND AT FUCKING PARADE REST!” Is what I heard in the concoction of words with a southern accent. “YOU’RE COMING WITH ME!” Is the last thing I understood.

 

So what happened was Cpl. Asshole kicked my door open and he saw that I did not wake up immediately. He proceeded to keep screaming at me and kicked me in the back and I still did not wake up. When I finally woke up he saw that I was drunk and then he decided to play “Marine” this time. He told me to get dressed. He didn’t walk me to the Sergeant. He didn’t walk me to the duty NCO at the bottom of the barracks. No, he told me to get dressed, he took me outside of the barracks and walked me straight the whole two miles to Battalion with the Staff Duty SNCO to get me documented for underage drinking and get me NJP’d. He took me to where the “birdman” worked. He took me to a Staff Sergeant that just got off the drill field and was wearing a crisp, clean high and tight. Cpl. Asshole wanted to make sure that I got burned to the stake.

 

Stay tuned for part 5 of my Okinawa Prison when I saw Col. Maximus and got the ultimate punishment. The deared and feared  NinJaPunch on Okinawa.

Broken Down, But Never Built Back Up

I know my grammar might not be great but I’m not really worried about that right now. I spent 8 months in Boot Camp, watched my original platoon graduate without me, and it feels that I haven’t really moved on from boot camp.

I joined in 2006 and the first week of boot camp I don’t remember taking a shit, the first time I ever pissed in my bed while sleeping, and just felt terrorized. I got through the first say 3 weeks and I got sick with pneumonia and didn’t wake up with the rest of the platoon on time. The DI shoved me off the top rack and I hit the floor, went to the hospital, and got dropped and put into MRP. From then on I got sick multiple time with bronchitis and pneumonia back and forth because I was around it all the time. The 3rd month I was called to clean on the other side of the parade deck, and that’s where I got to watch my platoon and the company while cleaning the windows.

Shortly after I was placed in a company just before going Phase 2. I had gotten pneumonia again a couple weeks after being with that company. Dropped again, got better, and joined another. During our physical training I had touched my face and 4 DI’s came over and started screaming in my face, I couldn’t understand what they were saying at all, was being spit in my face by all of them, burning my eyes and dangling from my chin with pain in my inner ear from the volume. I remember after doing a run with our gear on I slipped and fell on the stairs, a DI grabbed me pulled me up to our barracks, and I was forced to drink water from a disgusting canteen over and over again. I couldn’t drink anymore and threw it up all over the place in the middle of the DI highway where I was. I had to clean it up and by that time the day was over, needless to say I had 3 night watches that night. I woke up and started getting dressed and a DI came over and slammed my head into the metal rack. I was punched in the gut I would say 3 or 4 times in my time there, I’m talking full punches with their arm swung back all the way.

Anyways I got through Phase 2 and got dropped again for bronchitis. I just didn’t have any will left, I was depressed and I just felt like I couldn’t got on anymore. Then I got a infected ingrown toenail and before lights out when the DI’s inspect you he saw it and put his heel on my toe and pushed down. He asked if that hurt and I said no with tears coming out of my eyes, I later was taken to the hospital where they put 3 shots in my toe to numb it before taking it out. The guy took some scissors and started cutting down the middle and I screamed with pain cuz I could still feel, after 3 more shots it was removed. I got back with another company and finished phase 3 without my blue’s because something was going on I don’t know I was never told. During the ceremony I never felt better, I never felt like I accomplished anything. I have never said Oorah because I just never wanted to, even when people say it to me nowadays. I regret ever going and I wish it never happened. My toe nail grows with a space in between the nail and it just reminds me of the pain everyday. I’m not saying that I got it worse or better, this is just what happened to me.

After boot camp the hazing never stopped and eventually I did a tour in Iraq. We returned to Iowa, and I never went back, I quit. I was given an Other than Honorable Discharge. I wrote this because someone got in my face yesterday and I just had a breakdown, so I had to get this out somehow. Thanks for reading and excusing my writing skills…

 

Submitted by “Michael Power”

My worst experience in the MC was training.

I have to say by far my worst experience was in the Marine Corps was the training. All the way from basic to my job school, after that it was pretty chill once I hit the fleet but still had to deal with some stupid bullshit. I still have nightmares about my horrible experience at boot camp at the hands of other recruits, all because I got dropped for an injury and had to pick up with another platoon halfway through. From the first day I was bullied and later got jumped in the shower room after they wanted to “talk” because I didn’t get tasks done fast enough, after that me and others who had picked up with me (they experienced the same things I did) and did everything in our power to get the platoon fucked up on purpose until the drill instructors caught on to what we were doing and left us alone. At the end I personally told the ones I hated most that I hoped that if I ever saw them again they would pay.

At MCT I got my chance, while there one of the assholes that was in my basic platoon was in the same unit I was. I mostly avoided him the whole time but on the last hump he found me and started the same bullshit trying to bully me, I was too busy helping my friends to grind on to pay any attention to him. However on the cool down march the way back to the barracks he started making fun of the fact I was tired (who wasn’t after so many miles?). Finally I had had enough and unslung my rifle from my shoulder and slammed my rifle butt into his face knocking his ass to the ground, not caring who saw it. I was just happy with the fact I got my revenge but the best part was my sergeant saw and heard the whole thing. He separated us and told the other guy to pick himself up and that was the end of it. No NJP, no repercussions and I never saw that prick again but man it felt good!

Submitted by: TP

Okinawa Prison (Part 3)

To sum up the Marine Corps in Okinawa in a few words would be like this: Marine Corps life on Okinawa was a perfect mixture of MCRD, OCS, CCU, and brig put together, with a sprite of insane asylum.

The salty Marines that were on the island for a while were not like your average Marine that you would find on Camp Pendleton, Camp Lejeune, Marine Barracks Washington DC, or Kaneohe Bay HI. These Marines had a little bit of freedom. These Marines at the end of the day could get in their cars, drive off base and see what it was like to be a normal person, even if it was only on the weekends Marines stateside can have that release from the eagle globe and anchor and at least drive away to a far away happy land, even if it took 6 hours. Marines on Okinawa were stuck on base and stuck to their barracks. Marines on Okinawa were in “fuck fuck” mode 24/7. If there was a typhoon, Marines would be locked down in the barracks and not allowed to leave period. If a Marine had to go to the chow hall he would have to wear a flak, kevlar and H harness. Even to go out and smoke or else you would be written up by the Camp Guard rolling around in their humvees.

We were pretty much stuck with each other and there was no escape. If you did not like a Marine, too bad so sad, you literally had to put up with him 24/7. The women to men ratio was about 28 men to 1 woman, so you know how bad it got and how low standards would drop. You ever remember a nasty female Marine that got hit on after a while when there are no other women around? Okinawa was ten times worse. If a woman looked like R Lee Ermey, that woman would have constantly around her about eight Marines that would do whatever she wanted. There was no pussy on Okinawa to make matters short. I remember my standards dropping so low that I tried to get with women I would never, ever in a million years get with stateside.

The barracks was much like a prison. It was not like the barracks you see on Camp Pendleton or Lejeune that looks like a cheap Motel-6 with the doors on the out side. The barracks on Okinawa had the doors on the inside, kind of like the projects in a big inner city with one way in and one way out. Right in the front was a motivated Marine with a green military notebook always checking Marines on their way out. Marines had to sign out and in on that green military notebook and if a Marine was not signed back in after midnight (he he) the Sgt would start drop kicking all the doors, wake everyone up, get us in the common lounge and chew our asses for not “looking out for our own.” As if it was really our fault that a motherfucker decided not to come back. We would stay up all night looking for this motherfucker and the Sgt would not let us sleep until that dumb ass was found. If it got really bad the CO and 1st Sgt would come to the barracks and chew our asses even more.

The barracks was much like a prison. Every deck had a fire watch of two people. One on the desk and the other one walking up and down the hallway. Of course, both of these idiots had to wear full battle gear (flak, kevlar, H-harness with two full canteens etc.). Every time a higher up would come we had to stand up and say “good evening sir/mam Lcpl. Idiot reports barracks whatever all secure at this time etc. etc. there are no unusual activities to report at this time sir/mam!” This had to go on forever and if a motivated Ssgt that just got off the drill field and came in as the SNCO of the day (you know the rest, I’ll leave it up to your imagination) there was hell to pay.

There was no escape from this prison, and yet Marines STILL managed to get caught underage drinking, fighting, stealing, or fucking in their rooms and would get burned to the stake. The higher ups would always put Nazi style rules on us and really breathe down our necks and Marines would find a way to fuck up and get the whole company in trouble. Some got in trouble cause they were stupid. Some got in trouble because they were alcoholics. Many got in trouble because they just flat out stopped giving a damn. Somewhere deep inside their hearts they just gave up playing the game, picked up a bottle of booze and got in trouble. This was the reason why so many of us had to pay the piper. It was not strange for us to do a field day for someone else’s mistakes. It was not rare for us to play that boot camp game (2 sheets 1 blanket) when a Lcpl said “fuck you” to the Cpl.

One day I remember a Marine came in after midnight one night. Me and a couple of other Marines got pretty drunk that night. The CO came the next day at 0500 and took us on an OCS style run for like eight miles or so. Now you can imagine how I felt running at 0500 for that distance with no sleep and a lot of alcohol in my system. It was hard not to puke but when the motherfucker in front of you, left of you, and right of you are puking their guts out and you smell it. You have no choice but to join it. Okinawa sucked bad, but it sucked even worse if you got in trouble.

Stay tuned for part 4 of my Okinawa prison experience when I saw the bird man and got my ass NJP’d in Okinawa, you will not believe the shit I put up with. Stay tuned.

Sergeant King. The pride of my unit. The man who murdered his own son.

We’re coming up on the anniversary of the day that my first NCO in the fleet was arrested for killing his two month old son by crushing his skull. It was obviously the kid’s fault, he wouldn’t stop crying when the guy was playing video games.

The funny thing is that this motivator was the pride of my unit. He embodied everything I hate about the Marine Corps. He didn’t know the most basic fundamentals of his job, only maintained a fist class PFT because his best friend was the company clerk, and he loved to get drunk and beat on his wife, or one of us if we were in the wrong place at the wrong time.

But the higher ups of my unit held him up as an example of a truly great Marine because he sucked miles of dicks, and loved to stab anyone and everyone in the back in front of whoever was of higher rank. He was meritoriously promoted, and had the highest pros and cons in the platoon.

Fuck you Sergeant King, burn in hell you piece of shit.

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Submitted by: freeatlastfreeatlast

Okinawa Prison (Part 2)

Now let me get a little deep here of how bad it sucked in Okinawa. See, joining the military sucks pretty bad. Joining the Marine Corps sucks that much more. Being a Marine in Okinawa is downright painful. Now the Group I was with was even that much worse as the Brigadier General was a mustang that served in Vietnam. The Battalion I was with was even worse than the other Battalion’s that where in it as the Colonel (we called him Col. Maximus) was known for burning Marines to the stake with not 45 days restriction, but 60 day restrictions, reduction in rank and the max amount of money taken from you (1200 as a PFC). The Company I was with was downright atrocious as it was known as the Company that was always fucking up and getting in trouble (underage drinking, jumping the fence after midnight curfew, larceny etc).

There were a lot of Marines before me that pretty much fucked it up for the future Marines. They fucked shit up and then left after their 1 year tour came to an end. They would leave and dodge the bullet. I came in right in the wake of things. I came in when all the higher ups were like “fuck you all, now we are going to get serious” it was another one of these “punish you for what the ones before you did” kind of thing. I came to Oki when the tours of service were raised to two years for single Marines, three years for married Marines. Now let me paint a picture.

A while back, there were these group of jar heads that raped an Okinawa teenage girl in the 90’s (y’all pretty much heard of it) and the future retards would get punished as a result (another one of those being punished for others kind of thing). Let me read the list of what Marines couldn’t do in Okinawa. Let’s see, Marines couldn’t leave base by themselves, they needed a libo buddy. All the other branches could happily leave base and come back by themselves, but us Marines had to have a damn libbo buddy (makes it that much harder to get laid out in town). Us Marines had a libo card system, red meant that you had to be back by midnight or you risked getting NJP’d. Yellow meant that you could go off base by yourself. But, the only way you could get it was if you were and NCO and ran above a 285 PFT (figures, make it harder for dumbasses) and even then some NCO’s were not permitted to have a yellow libo card cause some dumb fuck came in late a couple of nights ago (again getting punished for others). Other branches, regardless of rank could drive a vehicle on base. Now you could imagine how us retards felt when we would see E-2 Sailors, Soldiers, and Airmen driving their cool Japanese cars bumping their music and us dumbasses had to march in formation like recruits and the only music that was bumping for us was the Sgt’s cadence.

Now, I know it sucked being a Marine, but what really pissed me off was how all the other branches could drink at twenty years of age and buy as many cases of beer they wanted. Us idiots were not allowed to drink until age 21. And those that were 21 could only buy a six pack for the whole day if you were E-3 and below. This really bothered me because I felt discriminated (kind of like Jews in Europe when the Germans were taking over). And no I don’t buy the “were Marines and were held to a higher standard” bullshit because that was downright stupid and I knew it was a way to micro manage Marines into not drinking. I did not get this, I would ask myself “don’t we serve the same country? Don’t we serve the same Department of Defense? Aren’t we all in this together? Doesn’t the USMC need the Navy as much as the Navy works with the Army as much as we all use the AirForce’s airplanes?” I felt very offended at this. For the first time I felt discriminated for the uniform I wore. I soon started to see my digital cammies as an orange prison jump suit. Marines that would get questioned off base by the Shore Patrol (higher up Marines in civvies out to burn Marines in town) would lie about being in the Army, Navy or AirForce out of survival’s sake, and they would still get burned and put on blast that they claimed another branch. This is when I really hated the USMC. I felt that I was being punished for no fucking reason at all, I really did not commit a crime but it was kind of like being the son of a slave in ancient Rome and automatically becoming a slave. I did not understand this.

So to make a long story short, I was in the darkest of the darkest of the darkest units that could possibly exist in the USMC. I was worse off than the guys in the Brig because all they did was eat, sleep, watch tv. We did not even get to enjoy those luxuries. We were constantly getting hazed and fucked with. Not to mention the Sgt. I mentioned before would love to spread bad news to us, he would always belittle us and remind us on a daily basis how shitty we had it. He would always stand in front of us and say “you motherfuckers are not going anywhere this weekend, you motherfuckers will not drink this weekend, you mother fuckers will not ride honchos (Japanese taxis) for this week, and guess what, when you motherfuckers get back to the barracks, we are going to have a Charlie, fuck that, and Alpha formation tonight at 2200 after fielday (we fieldayed every day).” I seriously started to hate the USMC because I felt that I was being discriminated for no fucking reason at all. I would sometimes sit on my rack at night and punch the shit out of the wall with tears coming down my face (not being a pussy but I felt like I was being raped and treated unfairly for no fucking reason). This really hit home for me, I was very angry at the decisions I made and I soon started to seriously hate the USMC. I have been in jail before but guess what, it was not even a fraction as shitty as the unit I was with as I had better chow and got to sleep my eight hours and I was not constantly getting fucked with. The excuse that the higher ups would say that the reason for our mistreatment was shit like “we’re the best, we’re held to a higher standard, Chesty Puller believed in hardship, hardship makes better Marines, Semper Fi do or die, we have been doing this for 232 years etc.) this really ticked me off as I felt as the higher ups were doing a mockery of our bullshit existence. It really hit me, when we were voluntold to fill sand bags and make fighting holes for a mock exercise for a Company that we were not even associated with. Our CO got along with the other CO and said “fuck it, make my Marines do it” it really started to dawn on me when I was out in the 100+ degree weather with 95% humidity at 1200 out in the hot ass sun that it was going to be a long two years of my life. I could remember filling those sand bags that were 55lbs each and carrying two of them atop of both my shoulders and carrying it up hill for 200+ yards and looking at the sky and seeing a jet fly in the horizon. It was a jet that was from Kadena Air Force base and it was doing an exercise. I could so vividly remember that I would do anything, ANYTHING to be that motherfucker as he was an Airman and atop of that he was an officer. That is like having a double win win situation. I remember thinking “you lucky, lucky motherfucker!”

Stay tuned for part 3 of my Okinawa Prison experience. This is the tip of the ice berg.

Submitted by “free_bird”

Okinawa Prison (Part 1)

I got a story for you all. When I was unhappily locked up in Okinawa, Camp Kinser (sausage fest) I felt the oppression, depression, and imprisonment unlike most Marines in the USMC. I’m talking about we had to march to the chow hall, march to work etc. If we had to go to the PX the Sgt. would literally make us walk in fire teams, like the grunts do in echelons, with the “supposed” rifle man, fire team leader and machine gunner. We would look stupid going to get haircuts, etc. in fire team formations.

We would then form it up to form it up right out side barracks 1224 for 45+ minutes with the fat drop (Forrest Gump) style kind of rain. The Sgt. would then make us get in a straight line and police call the football field. We were ordered to pick up all the white daisy flowers. But it was not your average police call, we had to stand at attention, forward march one step, stop, bend over, and pick up a white daisy. We went from goal post to goal post for, let’s say, 600 yards back and forth. We were then ordered to field day our rooms. The Chinese way. Note that we lived on the fourth deck and had to carry all of our shit out to the parking lot. The Sgt. (with a beer in his hand and his Japanese girlfriend waiting in his room) would order us to skuz brush the deck like recruits do in bootcamp. We would do this for, let’s see, till 0330 or something. It did not matter how clean we made our rooms because the Sgt. would just “find” dirt somewhere and tell us to clean. This Sgt. would make sure he PT’d us for a very long time, so that when we came back to our barracks, showered, shit, shaved we barely had enough time for chow and if we were a minute late, the Sgt. would be waiting with a charge sheet.

At work, we would be ordered to move shit to one corner, then another corner, then another corner etc. On the way back to the barracks we would always be ordered to type a 1000 word essay on stuff like “why I love the USMC, why was Chesty Puller great, what does it mean to have Espirit de Corps etc.” and would be ordered to take it to the Sgt’s room at 0000 sharp. Mind we had to get up at 0430, to form it up at 0445, so the Sgt. can take us on a run at 0545, come back and be at work by 0730 sharp or else. We would constantly get harrassed with this beer holding Sgt., mind that we were not allowed to drink at all but the Sgt. would chug his beers in front of us while we were getting our asses chewed in the common lounge. The Sgt. would later order us to have our rooms uniformed, even though he had a couch, big screen tv, two racks put together to make a kind size bed, but we had to be “uniform” because that is what Marines do.

This is when it hit me. This is when I realized that this Sgt. did not fuck with us cause we fucked up, he fucked with us because he was cynical and the higher ups did not give a damn at all. This is when I realized that I made a big mistake coming to Okinawa prison. I soon hated putting on the uniform. I soon hated the Eagle Globe and Anchor because I thought that it was full of cannibals that enjoyed hurting their own. That is when me and a couple of other Marines became “shit bags” but in reality we just stopped caring about “Espirit de Corps.” This unit was so bad that Marines in Iraq would porpusefully extend so that they wouldn’t have to deal with garrison bull shit. This is the tip of the ice berg and I will soon write part 2 of my Okinawa experience.

Submitted by: “free_bird”

Why I didn’t join the Marine Corps.

Now, I know what you might be thinking. “Oh, here we go with another Air Force elitist.” But alas, that is not the case. I hold no discrimination specifically against the Marine Corps, actually. I hate all of the branches equally. With that said, let me help put into perspective my experiences when it came to joining the Marine Corps, and why I quit.

Growing up, I loved war movies. After watching them I would always get so inspired to go and fight for my country. I would go and do research on the Marine Corps and the Army for hours on end. Finding out about how to join, what the jobs were, and pretty much everything I could find. The most recent of which, was after I had gone on an 81 mile march with some marines in honor of the (approximately) 81 marines who died in the second battle of Fallujah. One of the marines who joined us during this walk was a marine who had been in for around 29 years. After going on this adventure, it was the thing that finally got me serious about talking to a recruiter in joining the military. Initially, actually, I had gone to the National Guard recruiter and scheduled a meeting with an Air Force recruiter, but after requesting information online for the Marine Corps, they had contacted me and had me come into the recruiting station to meet with me. After that… I was hooked.

I started going through the process, my recruiter being extremely helpful and understanding, making sure that I had all of the requirements needed in order to join the Marine Corps. Now, when we had gotten to allergies, I thought I told him that I think I’m allergic to cats. After telling him this, we stepped outside and he told me that I will have to put that on certain documentation and that it could lead to me being disqualified. He talked about how he had never seen a cat in all of his 10+ years of being in the Marine Corps, and the chance of me seeing one would be slim to none, so I had the choice to not say anything about it if I didn’t want to. If I did this however, I would have to make sure that I was consistent in saying this with telling my senior recruiter, MEPS, and the documentation. I took his advice, under the impression that he was thinking about my best interest, when in reality he just wanted to make sure he didn’t lose another potential recruit. Although it can be argued that he didn’t want something small like that to stop me from “living my dream” of being a marine, it was later on in and after the enlistment process that I found out what my recruiter was really like as a person.

After finishing up everything at MEPS, I had become a poolee. Now, later on in being in the DEP, I had decided that I wanted to go Active Duty. After telling my recruiter this, he pretty much just laughed at me. Although I was passing my IST, I wasn’t getting 20 pull-ups or 9 minute run times, which apparently was his standard for what anyone going Infantry should have. At PT (which we have 4 times throughout the week) he would mock me for my scores not being as high as he wanted them to be. “And you want to be  infantry?” He would say. In addition to this, he, along with the other recruiters, would humiliate me along with any of the other poolees whenever they could. Claiming that they were doing this to prepare us for boot camp, it was not what we needed. They would try to trick me into a joke, and if I didn’t take the bait and ignored them they would just mock me even more. I know that it’s worse actually being in, but I was not a marine. I was a poolee. They told us to completely trust them, after making some kind of joke about how we were stupid or something of that sort.

One time, a week before a Pool function (and Winter break) I had gotten sick. It was only a cold, but nevertheless I was sick. I had actually gotten sick from another poolee. I knew that people were shipping soon, so I told my recruiter that I didn’t want to go to the pool function because I knew there was no way I was going to be able to do the IST in this condition. He told me to just suck it up, once again mocking me for the fact that I wanted to be infantry. I knew that if I was in a situation, such as a combat situation where if I would have to fight, I would, but I didn’t want to risk the poolees shipping soon to get sick. I ended up showing up for 15 minutes to sign the paper to show that I signed up, then went back home to get some sleep. Not only that, but literally the night before I had found this website, and after reading articles all night, was extremely unmotivated to do anything involving the Marine Corps at the time. The next time I was at the station for PT, I explained to him that I did not want to get the other poolees sick, and that is the main reason why I did not show up that day. He then told me that he did not care if I had gotten the other poolees sick, as long as I showed up.

It was then, that I realized he did not have our interests or safety in mind whatsoever. He was only interested in what he could benefit from.

This, in concordance with what I had found out about many of the NCOs in the Marine Corps, I found out that my recruiter was another one of the sergeants that would treat their junior enlisted horribly and for no good reason. I’m not saying I found out any  information about his past to confirm this, but his personality fit the profile perfectly.

After signing my contract, I had to go and meet the “Commanding Officer” or whoever at the reserve station I would have been serving at. In meeting him, I learned more about the current situation with the Marine Corps than I did from any of the recruiters. You know how recruiters will tell you that you can go reserve, and then switch to active duty if you want to? Technically this is true. But the CO made it very clear to me. “If you are going in as a reservist initially, there is an extremely small chance that you will ever be an active duty marine. It just makes no sense for us to pay for an older marine with little actual training or experience to become an active duty marine when we can just get a new,  stronger person to come in initially as an active duty marine and fill that spot anyway.” Is what he said to me. Although I knew that recruiters would bend the truth to get me to believe things, this was a real life example that affirmed it for me.

So, after all of these experiences, my recruiters mocked me, lied to me, and showed that they didn’t care about me or any of the other poolees as long as we became their meal ticket.

This entire experience along with what I saw from the articles on this website showed that this was not the right place for me. Not only that, but I realized that the military in itself is a deception. We are constantly bombarded with shows, movies, news, etc. about how great our military is, but once you get into the roots of it, you find out how corrupt it is.

This has nothing to do with the fact that I wouldn’t fight. If there is a war and I truly believe in the cause of one of the sides, I would gladly fight. But to do so with an organization that is going to constantly tear me down and punish me unless I conform to the rigged system would be against everything I believe in.

I wanted to be the marine that I saw on TV, not the kind of marine I would actually become going into the Marine Corps.

In conclusion, if you are thinking about joining the Marine Corps, please take great consideration into what it’s actually about. You will be fighting for your country, but will you be fighting for the right reasons? Because you will get no say in the matter. Wherever the guys in the suits in ties who sleep comfortably in their nice suburban homes/small mansions will be the ones who decide who you fight and why. Not you. Amongst many other things, which this site brings to light.

Although these weren’t the only reasons I decided to do something different, they were strong motivators to run away as fast as possible.

If you are doing this because you need a job, or you need an education, or anything like that… Please don’t do it. Do what makes you happy in life. Even if it means you won’t make a lot of money, or won’t get an education (Not saying you would make a lot of money in the Marine Corps… you know what I mean).

Please be careful with this decision. You are risking 4-8 of your best years on this decision. Making the wrong one could mean dealing with regret for the rest of your life.

Submitted by: Home Alone

How to Prepare for the Marines

Filthy Little Hobbitses

Do you want to simulate your enlistment? Here’s what you have to do:

Go find yourself an incredibly insane hobo, the crazier the better. Pay this hobo with a bottle or two of some hard liquor, and have him chug both bottles before you begin. Now, have him scream unintelligible nonsense at the top of his lungs a few inches from your face, while you stand perfectly still. While standing still, scream “aye” at the top of your lungs, again and again and again and again, really, you can’t scream that word enough.

After this has gone on for a few hours, jump into the dumpster that hobo was living in and start scrubbing it “clean” with a toothbrush. Remember, that hobo should still be shouting in your face as you’re doing this, and you should still be screaming “aye” as quickly and as loudly as you can. Don’t be alarmed if that hobo starts screaming about how fat, lazy, stupid, or weak you are. We all know that he’s a tired old alcoholic with no future prospects and a past he
regrets, that just makes it that much more like the Marine Corps.

This should go on for a few days.

After the hobo kicks you out of his dumpster, calling you a bitch faggot as he does so, you should both take a breather by eating whatever food you can scrounge out of the discarded cans in the dumpster. Be sure to be very appreciative towards the hobo for giving you this time to eat. He’s such a nice guy after all, he only wants what’s best for you. Why do you make him yell at you like he does? You’re such a lowdown scumbag.

Once you’ve had a few minutes to eat what you could, it’s time to train. Goody! That stuff that you saw in MW3 will soon be happening to you! I’ll bet you can’t wait to win the medal of honor and make your parents proud. So, go grab yourself about one hundred pounds worth of trash bags, and sling them over your back. Then, run about ten steps down the alley, dive to the ground and slam your knees as hard as you can into the pavement. Get into the prone, and then get back up and do it again. Do this for a few hours, while the hobo follows you with a trash bag full of pillows on this back and he calls you a weak bitch for being slower than him. He’s such a hard ass that hobo.

After this has all been done, dump out all the trash out of your trash bags, and start organizing that shit! Everything must be in its proper place. The banana peels must not touch the pizza boxes, the diapers must be neatly folded into five by five inch squares, and the toothbrush that you used to scrub out that dumpster had better not be used! After you’ve spent a few hours making it perfect, have the hobo come over and tell you to move everything over to the next alley. He should also be yelling at you to hurry up as you do this.

Eventually, everything is ready, and your hobo can now inspect your trash. Stand rigidly in pride by your neatly arranged trash, it’s a reflection of you after all! The hobo should then glance at the pile of trash, and demand to know why you’re so dirty. Respectfully tell him that respectfully, you were respectfully running around an alley with a respectful amount of trash on your respectful back. The hobo should then point out that HE was running with you, and He’s not so dirty. Then respectfully point out that the mr. gracious hobo sir had not gone directly from that to organizing a pile of trash. This will set off the hobo like you just slapped his sister in the face with your dick and didn’t call her back.

The hobo will then yell something about “enjay pees” and “sixtyone oh fives” for a little bit, and you should feel ashamed for how blatantly disrespectful your comment had been.

Hell, if you want hardship that badly, just keep doing this for about four years. Remember, you can’t defend yourself from that hobo, nor can you quit till those years are up, or you’ll have committed a felony. Don’t worry though, you can tell all your friends that you’re living the hard life, what do they know about hardship? And the hobo will let you wear his old denim suit when you go visit your family once a year or so, you’ll turn all the she-bums heads as you strut through the ghetto. Stick with it for twenty years or so and you too can be just like that hobo, and you too can treat some kid like shit for booze.

Submitted by: “freeatlastfreeatlast”

Marines like to hurt each other more than their enemies

Today we would like to demonstrate typical behavior of marines when they are off duty. They get drunk and hurt each other, usually the weaker ones. Some may make the excuse that this “builds character”, or that it “makes you stronger”. That is bullshit.

What this does is piss someone off and make them resent you. Do you think the ones getting picked on will be just as likely to take a bullet for their bullies than their friends? This is not teamwork. This is not a team. This is a mess.

All that behavior like this does is reinforce the popular notion that “Enlisted marines are supposed to be scoundrels. That’s why you get a medal if you stay out of trouble for 3 years” (as my former LT once told me). Frankly, if the marine corps wants to be known as a safe haven for children who can’t control their adolescent impulses, who lack any semblance of self-control, self-restraint, or self-discipline, and who joined because they couldn’t make it anywhere else, then the marine corps is doing just fine. But if the marine corps wants to be known as an elite and highly professional fighting force, then it has a long way to go. – S_The_Mod and NINJA_PUNCH

The Life of a Marine Corps Recruiter Part 1

So, currently a Marine Corps Recruiter and hating life very badly. Can anyone please explain to me why I would want, or even try, to enlist a kid at 2 in the morning pushing carts in a parking lot? No clue. But apparently he’s right what we need according to my SNCOIC. Also I by no means understand the leadership values out here. So you’re telling me if somebody has a 300 PFT that gives them that much more of an intelligence factor to lead. Nope it doesn’t but it sure helps them get meritorious SSgt doesn’t it. Feel bad for those young Marines who inherit him as a SNCO. I guess that’s what happens when your Sgt Maj is a cat 4 (asvab failure with waiver to enlist the one who says war dog and hard charge 25 times in a PME) it’s whatever though he has a wall of Marine Corps shit on display which gives him super powers after he tells you about his second tour on the drill field. Then comes the fun part not frauding a kid in or telling them to lie. You tell the friends of them to tell them to lie so really I guess it should be more of the creative part. Then on to Meps to tell the docs everything or shut up. 50/50 chance here lets hope we win if not on to the next number. Key to recruiting deny, deny, deny, and lots churching things to a point it actually sounds good to you. 8412s lead the way and stay at home for 16 years of the Marine Corps career good for them way to claim the title with no deployments. Well have a good one saw some kids smoking weed on the corner better go talk to them. 

Submitted by:  2807aListofLies

A Veteran’s Apology

I write this Veteran’s day to apologize.

I swore to defend the constitution against all enemies, foreign and domestic, and I failed that oath.

I failed to stand against a government who passed the PATRIOT act in violation of the 4th Amendment.

I failed by deploying without a formal declaration of war in violation of Article 1 section 8.

I failed to liberate people held indefinitely without charges in violation of Article 1, section 9, and the 5th Amendment.

I failed to stand against digitally strip searching, or enhanced pat-downs without probable cause or warrant in violation of the 4th Amendment.

I failed to defend Farmers from being raided by FDA agents for selling Fresh milk.

I failed to stand against assassinating American citizens on an accusation in violation of the 5th, 6th, and 14th Amendments.

I can’t name all the constitutional violations the federal government has taken. There are other violations by state and local governments such as the murder and cover-up of a deaf man by Seattle Police, or the violations from before I took my oath.

Victimless laws classified as crimes against government are what Thomas Jefferson defined as Tyranny, or that which is illegal for the people, but legal for the government.

I failed because I haven’t stood up. I am a coward, caring more for my career than for American’s liberty. I failed my duty, and I’ve no honor on Veteran’s day. America is not the land of the free because I haven’t been brave.

CPT Jack. R. T.
US Army Resigned – Iraq Vet.
Level III MACP instructor, USYKA/WYKKO sensei
Professional Hunter/Trapper/Country living survivalist.

 

Source: https://www.facebook.com/toolsofwar/posts/10151057854521995

Reporting A Crime Is As Bad As Committing It

Another fun story I have is from MOS school. I am a generator mechanic, so I went to Courthouse Bay for MOS school. Courthouse Bay is kind of known as a haven for alcoholic junior Marines, so it really sucked being there. My class was full of idiots who got drunk every Wednesday night (seriously, who the fuck gets drunk on a Wednesday?), even though students are not allowed to drink on weekdays, especially in the barracks. They would go around every Wednesday night (Thursday morning, technically) around 0200 and bang on everyone’s doors. They did this to my room way more often than any other room because they knew it bothered me. After this went on for a couple months, I told them that if they did it again, I would report them to the AOD. They thought I was just bullshitting them because I was known as the wet blanket of the class.

Well, they decided to do the same shit the next week. I sat there in bed listening to them smack on the door and yell for a good ten minutes before I opened the door and bitched them out. I gave them one final ultimatum: go away, and I won’t tell the AOD. They didn’t go away. So, I marched my ass down to the duty hut, called the AOD, and had them all reported. Now, because my training company had gotten in so much trouble recently with underage drinking and drinking in the barracks, the AOD worked with our company CO to keep this under wraps. Our CO decided that a fair punishment for these idiots would be a week of duty and restriction for all of them. Oh, but here’s the kicker, I also got the same punishment. Why did I get punished, you ask? Because I “snitched” on my fellow Marines, which decreases unit morale. Yeah, that’s right. Apparently I decreased unit morale by reporting a bunch of underage drinking jackasses who were violating the UCMJ. That’s what’s wrong with the Marine Corps. You have a bunch of rank chasing higher ups who really don’t give a shit about unit morale, or anything like that, but are only concerned with their own fitness reports.

 

Submitted by: “No, Thanks”

FY14 VOLUNTARY ENLISTED EARLY RELEASE PROGRAM (VEERP)

[Note: The original FY14 VEERP (MARADMIN 325/13) has been CANCELLED. This post reflects the most current MARADMIN.]

 

R 022045Z JUL 13
UNCLASSIFIED/
MARADMIN 330/13
MSGID/GENADMIN/CMC WASHINGTON DC MRA MP//
SUBJ/FY14 VOLUNTARY ENLISTED EARLY RELEASE PROGRAM//
REF/A/MSGID:DOC/SECNAV/YMD:20120323/NOTAL//
REF/B/MSGID: MSG/CMC/121555ZJUL12//
REF/C/MSGID:MSG 2006/CMC/-//
REF/D/MSGID:DOC/CMC/YMD:20040824//
REF/E/MSGID:DOC/CMC/YMD:20070606//
REF/F/MSGID:DOC/N-13/YMD:20051220//
REF/G/MSGID:DOC/DFAS-KC-FSP/YMD:19950824//
REF/H/MSGID:MSG/CMC/292102ZJUN2009//
REF/I/MSGID:MSG/CMC/152049ZJUL2009//
REF/J/MSGID:WEB/VA/YMD:20101109//
NARR/REF A IS SECNAV APPROVAL OF VOLUNTARY ENLISTED EARLY RELEASE PROGRAM (VEERP) DATED 23 MAR 2012.  REF B IS MARADMIN 371/12, FY13 VOLUNTARY ENLISTED EARLY  RELEASE PROGRAM (VEERP).  REF C IS PERSONNEL ADMIN ADVISORY (PAA) 06-06.  REF D IS ONLINE MCTFSPRIUM. REF E IS MCO P1900.16F, MARINE CORPS SEPARATION AND RETIREMENT MANUAL WITH CHANGE TWO. REF F IS OPNAVINST 1900.4, SEPARATION PAY FOR INVOLUNTARY SEPARATION FROM ACTIVE DUTY WITH CHANGE ONE.  REF G IS DFAS 7220.31R, MCTFS APSM. REF H IS MARADMIN 0389/09, POST 9-11 GI BILL ELIGIBILITY AND BENEFITS.  REF I IS MARADMIN 0421/09, POST 9-11 GI BILL TRANSFERABILITY OF EDUCATIONAL BENEFITS ADMINISTRATION AND MANAGEMENT, ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES. REF J IS THE MONTGOMERY GI BILL WEBSITE WWW.GIBILL.VA.GOV.//
POC/C.M. BLAIS/SSGT/UNIT:CMC MMEA-5/-/TEL:DSN 278-9971//
POC/R.H. EZELL/MAJ/UNIT:CMC MPP-20/-/TEL:DSN 278-9361//
GENTEXT/REMARKS/1. PURPOSE.  THE FY14 VOLUNTARY ENLISTED EARLY RELEASE PROGRAM (VEERP) IS A COST SAVINGS INITIATIVE THAT WILL PERMIT SHAPING AND SUSTAINING THE FORCE WITHIN THE CONSTRAINTS OF THE APPROVED BUDGET.   THE PROGRAM REMAINS FOCUSED ON COST SAVINGS FOR THE MARINE CORPS AND IS NOT AN INDIVIDUAL ENTITLEMENT PROGRAM.  THIS MESSAGE SERVES TO ESTABLISH THE AUTHORITY, ELIGIBILITY, AND PROCEDURES FOR THE VOLUNTARY EARLY RELEASE OF ACTIVE DUTY ENLISTED MARINES WHOSE TERM OF SERVICE WILL EXPIRE DURING THE REMAINDER OF FY13 AND FY14.
2. BACKGROUND. REF A PROVIDES THE AUTHORITY FROM THE SECRETARY OF THE NAVY TO ESTABLISH A VOLUNTARY ENLISTED EARLY RELEASE PROGRAM.  REF B ANNOUNCED THE FY13 VEERP AND IS CANCELED UPON THE PUBLICATION OF THIS MARADMIN.   THE FY14 VEERP WILL COMMENCE UPON THE PUBLICATION OF THIS MARADMIN AND WILL EXPIRE ON 30 SEPTEMBER 2014.  MARINES APPROVED FOR THIS PROGRAM MAY SEPARATE NO MORE THAN 365 DAYS PRIOR TO THEIR CURRENT EXPIRATION OF ACTIVE SERVICE (EAS).  MARINES APPROVED FOR THE FY14 VEERP WILL BE CONSIDERED TO HAVE COMPLETED THEIR FULL ACTIVE SERVICE.  THIS MARADMIN DOES NOT EXEMPT MARINES FROM COMPLETING RESERVE OR READY RESERVE OBLIGATIONS PER THEIR INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ENLISTMENT CONTRACTS.  THIS PROGRAM IS ONLY BEING OFFERED TO MARINES WITH AN FY13 OR FY14 EAS.
3. ELIGIBILITY
A. ANY ACTIVE DUTY ENLISTED MARINE WITH AN FY13 OR FY14 EAS (1 OCTOBER 2012 TO 30 SEPTEMBER 2014).
B. MARINES MAY REQUEST TO SEPARATE NO MORE THAN 365 DAYS PRIOR TO THEIR CURRENT EAS.  A MARINE WITH AN FY14 EAS ON OR PRIOR TO 01 FEBRUARY 2014 IS AUTHORIZED TO REQUEST A SEPARATION WITHIN FY13 (I.E. TO EXECUTE A CROSS YEAR SEPARATION).  A MARINE WITH AN EAS OF 02 FEBRUARY 2014 OR LATER MAY REQUEST SEPARATION ON OR AFTER 01 OCTOBER 2013.  THE FOLLOWING EXAMPLES ILLUSTRATE DIFFERENT HYPOTHETICAL SITUATIONS:
– A MARINE WITH AN EAS OF 15 DECEMBER 2013 SUBMITS A REQUEST TO HAVE HIS EAS ADJUSTED TO 01 AUG 2013.  THIS IS A CROSS FY VEERP REQUEST BECAUSE THE ORIGINIAL EAS IS WITHIN FY14 AND THE REQUESTED SEPARATION DATE IS WITHIN FY13.  THIS REQUEST WILL RECEIVE CONSIDERATION BECAUSE THE ORIGINAL EAS IS PRIOR TO 01 FEBRUARY 2014.
– A MARINE WITH AN EAS OF 14 JUNE 2014 SUBMITS A REQUEST TO HAVE HER EAS ADJUSTED TO 01 AUG 2013.  THIS IS A CROSS FY VEERP REQUEST BECAUSE THE ORIGINIAL EAS IS WITHIN FY14 AND THE REQUESTED SEPARATION DATE IS WITHIN FY13.  THIS REQUEST WILL NOT RECEIVE CONSIDERATION BECAUSE THE ORIGINAL EAS IS NOT PRIOR TO 01 FEBRUARY 2014.
C. MARINES REQUESTING TO SEPARATE GREATER THAN 90 DAYS EARLY MUST HAVE AN ENDORSEMENT FROM THE FIRST GENERAL OFFICER IN THE CHAIN OF COMMAND FOR MAJOR SUBORDINATE COMMAND VISIBILITY OF STAFFING IMPACTS.  THE FOLLOWING EXAMPLES ILLUSTRATE DIFFERENT HYPOTHETICAL SITUATIONS:
– A MARINE WITH AN EXISTING EAS OF 01 AUGUST 2014 REQUESTS TO DEPART THE MARINE CORPS ON 01 JANUARY 2014.  AS THE REQUESTED EAS DATE IS GREATER THAN 90 DAYS FROM HIS ORIGINAL EAS DATE, HIS REQUEST MUST HAVE AN ENDORSEMENT FROM THE FIRST GENERAL OFFICER IN HIS CHAIN OF COMMAND FOR PROCESSING.
– A MARINE WITH AN EXISTING EAS OF 01 AUGUST 2014 REQUESTS TO DEPART THE MARINE CORPS ON 01 JUNE 2014.  AS THE REQUESTED EAS DATE IS LESS THAN 90 DAYS FROM HER ORIGINAL EAS DATE, HER REQUEST CAN BE FORWARDED WITHOUT A GENERAL OFFICER ENDORSEMENT.
D. MARINES MUST NOT BE STABILIZED FOR DEPLOYMENT AT THE TIME OF REQUESTED EARLY RELEASE (NEW EAS).  ADDITIONALLY, MARINES NOT STABILIZED BUT POSSESSING OBLIGATED SERVICE TO MEET FUTURE DEPLOYMENT DEMAND WILL BE CONSIDERED ON A CASE-BY-CASE BASIS.
E. MARINES ARE REQUIRED TO ATTEND MANDATED PRE-SEPARATION COUNSELING PER TITLE 10 USC 1142.  MARINES MUST BE TAP/TAMP COMPLETE AND MEDICALLY QUALIFIED PRIOR TO EARLY RELEASE.
F. MARINES MUST BE ELIGIBLE FOR AN HONORABLE OR GENERAL (UNDER HONORABLE CONDITIONS) DISCHARGE CHARACTERIZATION AT TIME OF EARLY RELEASE.
G. INDIVIDUAL REQUESTS MUST BE SUBMITTED VIA ADCON BATTALION/SQUADRON COMMANDING OFFICER WITH ENDORSEMENT TO BE CONSIDERED ELIGIBLE.
H. MARINES CURRENTLY SERVING AS PERMANENT RESIDENT ALIENS, IN ANTICIPATION OF GAINING UNITED STATES CITIZENSHIP, MUST HAVE SERVED A MINIMUM OF 3 YEARS ACTIVE SERVICE AT THE TIME OF EARLY RELEASE.
I.  MARINES THAT HAVE ONE OF THE FOLLOWING PRIMARY MOS’S ARE INELIGIBLE FOR AN EARLY RELEASE GREATER THAN 90 DAYS FROM THEIR ORIGINAL EAS: 0211, 0321, 0372, 2336, OR 7257.
4. INELIGIBILITY. MARINES MEETING ANY OF THE FOLLOWING CONDITIONS ARE INELIGIBLE TO PARTICIPATE IN THE FY14 VOLUNTARY ENLISTED EARLY RELEASE PROGRAM:
A. MARINES WHO DO NOT HAVE AN FY13 OR FY14 EAS DATE.
B. MARINES SCHEDULED FOR TRANSFER TO THE FMCR OR RETIRED LIST.
C. MARINES WHO ARE INDEBTED TO THE GOVERNMENT (TO INCLUDE ADVANCE AND EXCESS LEAVE). INDEBTED MARINES DESIRING EARLY SEPARATION CAN MAKE ACCELERATED REPAYMENT OF THEIR DEBTS BY INCREASING SCHEDULED INSTALLMENT AMOUNTS AND BY MAKING CASH COLLECTIONS TO REPAY THEIR INDEBTEDNESS. INDEBTEDNESS MUST BE ENTIRELY RESOLVED PRIOR TO EARLY RELEASE.
D. MARINES BEING RELEASED UNDER OTHER HQMC DIRECTED EARLY OUT PROGRAMS, E.G., EARLY RELEASE FOR EDUCATION, TEMPORARY EARLY RETIREMENT AUTHORITY, VOLUNTARY SEPARATION PAY PROGRAM.
E. MARINES PARTICIPATING IN THE NATIONAL CALL TO SERVICE PROGRAM.
F. MARINES THAT ARE CURRENTLY ON TERMINAL LEAVE AWAY FROM THE PERMANENT DUTY STATION (PDS) PENDING SEPARATION.
G. MARINES WHO MANIFEST SYMPTOMS OF POST TRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER/TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY AND ARE UNDERGOING POST DEPLOYMENT HEALTH EVALUATION AND MANAGEMENT CARE WILL NOT BE SEPARATED UNDER THIS AUTHORITY UNTIL THAT PROCESS IS COMPLETE OR A WAIVER OF TREATMENT EVALUATION HAS BEEN EXECUTED.
5. PROGRAM TIMELINE
A.  APPLICATION PROCESSING WILL COMMENCE IMMEDIATELY UPON RELEASE OF THIS MARADMIN.  THE 365 DAY EARLY RELEASE WINDOW IS DETERMINED BASED ON THE MARINE’S ORIGINAL EAS.   ADDITIONALLY, THE MARINE MUST MEET ALL ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA OUTLINED IN PARAGRAPH 3 OF THIS MARADMIN PRIOR TO EARLY RELEASE. UPON EARLY RELEASE, THE MARINE WILL BE CONSIDERED TO HAVE COMPLETED HIS/HER FULL ACTIVE SERVICE.  TO ALLOW FOR PROCESSING TIME, IT IS REQUESTED THAT VEERP PACKAGES BE SUBMITTED AS EARLY AS POSSIBLE, BUT AT LEAST 45 DAYS PRIOR TO REQUESTED EARLY RELEASE DATE.  COMMANDERS ARE ENCOURAGED TO EXPEDITE REQUESTS AS EARLY AS POSSIBLE IN ORDER TO MAXIMIZE BUDGETARY SAVINGS.
B. WHEN SUBMITTING VEERP REQUESTS, MARINES MUST ENSURE THEY ALLOW ENOUGH TIME FOR PROCESSING AND GENERATION OF APPROPRIATIONS DATA. VEERP REQUESTS MUST ARRIVE AT HQMC MMEA NO LATER THAN THREE WEEKS PRIOR TO ANTICIPATED DEPARTURE DATE FROM PDS TO INCLUDE TERMINAL LEAVE. THIS WILL ALLOW ADEQUATE TIME FOR PUREX CYCLES TO UPDATE MARINES’ LINES OF ACCOUNTING PRIOR TO DEPARTURE FROM PDS.
6. RESERVE COMPONENT OPPORTUNITY.  THE SELECTED MARINE CORPS RESERVE IS ACTIVELY SEEKING THE SERVICE OF SEPARATING MARINES WHO WANT TO REMAIN AFFILIATED WITH THE MARINE CORPS UPON TRANSITION FROM THE ACTIVE COMPONENT. OPPORTUNITIES EXIST FOR ADVANCED OR ADDITIONAL MOS TRAINING. DEPENDING ON MOS AND BILLET AVAILABILITY, AFFILIATION BONUSES MAY BE AVAILABLE FOR TRANSITIONING MARINES. INTERESTED MARINES MAY JOIN A UNIT BY APPLYING FOR THE DIRECT AFFILIATION PROGRAM (MARADMIN 462/12) OR REQUEST ADDITIONAL INFORMATION BY CONTACTING A RESERVE TRANSITION COORDINATOR (RTC). TO CONTACT AN RTC, SELECT THE NEAREST POC FROM THE LIST BELOW:
A. MCAS CHERRY POINT, MCB CAMP LEJUENE, MCAS BEAUFORT, AND MCRD PARRIS ISLAND:  SSGT CECILIA GONZALEZ AT COM: (910) 450-6291.
B. MCB CAMP PENDLETON, MCAS MIRAMAR, AND MCRD SAN DIEGO: GYSGT ROBERT MARCHAND AT COM: (760) 763-3426.
C. OKINAWA AND MCAS IWAKUNI: SSGT BRIAN JOSEPH AT (011) 81-611-722-6004.
D. NATIONAL CAPITAL REGION, MCB QUANTICO, AND ALL OTHER LOCATIONS:  GYSGT JEFFREY COCHRAN AT COM: (703) 432-9048.  AFTER REACHING THE EAS DATE, MARINES SEEKING ASSISTANCE WITH RESERVE AFFILIATION SHOULD CONTACT A PRIOR SERVICE RECRUITER AT WWW.MARINES.COM OR COMMERCIAL PHONE NUMBER 1-800-627-4637.
7. COORDINATING INSTRUCTIONS
A. HQMC (MP) MAINTAINS ALL POLICY ASSOCIATED WITH THIS PROGRAM.
B. HQMC (MM) MAINTAINS FINAL APPROVAL AUTHORITY FOR ALL REQUESTS.
C.  INDIVIDUAL MARINES MUST SUBMIT REQUESTS TO PARTICIPATE IN VEERP VIA THEIR CHAIN OF COMMAND.
D.  WHILE THE INTENT OF THIS PROGRAM IS COST SAVINGS, MSC G-1S ARE RESPONSIBLE AND SHOULD BE COGNIZANT OF UNITS REACHING CRITICAL STAFFING LEVELS TO RESPOND TO SHORT-TERM FORCE DEMANDS AS WELL AS ACCOMPLISH DAY-TO-DAY MISSION REQUIREMENTS.  MSC G-1S WILL ENSURE THAT VEERP APPROVAL RECOMMENDATIONS DO NOT REDUCE ON BOARD STAFFING BELOW 80 PERCENT OF TABLE OF ORGANIZATION AND NO LESS THAN 70 PERCENT OF EACH PRIMARY MILITARY OCCUPATIONAL SPECIALTY.
E. ADCON BATTALION/SQUADRON COMMANDERS WILL SUMBIT:
(1) ALL REQUESTS UNDER 90 DAYS FOR EARLY RELEASE VIA THEIR MSC G-1 TO HQMC (MMEA) VIA NAVAL MESSAGE WITH THE REQUIRED VEERP SPREADSHEET ATTACHMENT.
(2) ALL REQUESTS OVER 90 DAYS FOR EARLY RELEASE WILL BE SUBMITTED TO MSC G-1S FOR ENDORSEMENT FROM THE FIRST GENERAL OFFICER IN CHAIN OF COMMAND.  MSC G-1S WILL SUBMIT TO HQMC (MMEA) VIA NAVAL MESSAGE WITH THE REQUIRED VEERP SPREADSHEET ATTACHMENT.
(3) WITHOUT THE REQUIRED ATTACHMENT AND ACCURATE AND ELECTRONIC DATA INTERCHANGE PERSONAL IDENTIFIER (EDIPI), REQUESTS WILL NOT BE PROCESSED.  USE PROCEDURES FROM REF C TO TRANSMIT MARINE’S PERSONAL DATA.  THE REQUIRED SPREADSHEET ATTACHMENT CAN BE FOUND ON THE MMEA WEBSITE IN THE DISTRIBUTION AND POLICY REFERENCE AREA AFTER YOU LOG-IN TO THE PORTAL.  CONTACT HQMC (MM) POC WITH SUBMISSIONS QUESTIONS TO ENSURE ACCURACY IN SUBMISSION PROCEDURES.
(4) COMMANDERS WILL RECOMMEND APPROVAL OF THE SPECIFIC DATE FOR SEPARATION ON THE SPREADSHEET WHEN ENDORSING A MARINE’S REQUEST FOR EARLY RELEASE. COMMANDERS ARE ADVISED THAT VACANCIES OCCURING FROM MARINES APPROVED FOR VEERP WILL BE FILLED AS SOON AS PRACTICABLE BASED UPON PRIORITIZED REQUIREMENTS.  COMMANDERS ARE ENCOURAGED TO CONTACT MMEA FOR REPLACEMENT COORDINATION.  TERMINAL LEAVE IS AUTHORIZED AT COMMANDERS’ DISCRETION.
(5) COMMANDERS WILL PROVIDE SPECIFIC JUSTIFICATION FOR INDIVIDUAL MARINES NOT RECOMMENDED FOR APPROVAL TO PARTICIPATE IN THE PROGRAM.
(6) COMMANDERS ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT; THEY WILL ENSURE THAT APPROVAL DOES NOT REDUCE ON BOARD STAFFING BELOW 80 PERCENT OF TABLE OF ORGANIZATION AND NO LESS THAN 70 PERCENT OF EACH PRIMARY MILITARY OCCUPATIONAL SPECIALTY.
F. HQMC (MM) RESERVES THE AUTHORITY TO APPROVE/DISAPPROVE/RESTRICT THE TOTAL NUMBER OF EARLY RELEASE DAYS TO MEET THE NEEDS OF THE MARINE CORPS.  MARINES OVERSEAS AND IN SOME PRIMARY MILITARY OCCUPATIONAL SPECIALTIES MAY BE RELEASED AT LESS THAN REQUESTED RELEASE AND/OR COMMANDER RECOMMENDED DATES.  UPON HQMC (MM) FINAL APPROVAL, MMEA WILL REPORT THE NEW EAS/ECC VIA MCTFS UNIT DIARY ENTRY PER REF D.  COMMANDERS WILL BE NOTIFIED OF VEERP APPROVAL VIA DIARY FEEDBACK REPORT WITH HISTORY STATEMENT INDICATING APPROVAL FOR VEERP.  NAVAL MESSAGE CORRESPONDENCE FROM HQMC (MM) WILL BE ISSUED AS REQUIRED TO ASSIST IN PROCESSING OR TO ALERT COMMANDERS OF APPROVAL DETERMINATION CONTRARY TO RECOMMENDATIONS FROM THE ADCON COMMANDER.
G. MARINES BEING SEPARATED UNDER VEERP WILL SIGN A PAGE 11 ENTRY FOR INCLUSION IN THEIR OFFICIAL MILITARY PERSONNEL FILE ACKNOWLEDGING THEY ARE A VOLUNTEER FOR THE PROGRAM AND THAT SEPARATION REQUIREMENTS WILL BE COMPLETED PRIOR TO EAS.  EXAMPLE PAGE 11 ENTRY: I HAVE BEEN APPROVED FOR PARTICIPATION IN THE FY14 VOLUNTARY ENLISTED EARLY RELEASE PROGRAM.  I UNDERSTAND THAT MY NEW EAS IS (YYYY/MM/DD).  I HAVE BEEN COUNSELED ON THE CONTENTS OF THE FY14 VOLUNTARY ENLISTED EARLY RELEASE PROGRAM MARADMIN AND UNDERSTAND THAT I WILL BE CONSIDERED TO HAVE COMPLETED MY FULL ACTIVE SERVICE.  I UNDERSTAND THAT I AM REQUIRED TO COMPLETE ANY REMAINING RESERVE OR READY RESERVE OBLIGATIONS PER MY INDIVIDUAL SERVICE ENLISTMENT CONTRACT.  ADDITIONALLY, I UNDERSTAND THAT PRE-SEPARATION COUNSELING, TAP/TAMP AND MEDICAL SCREENING FOR SEPARATION MUST BE COMPLETE PRIOR TO MY NEW EAS.
H. UNIT DIARY ENTRIES REPORTING RELEASE FROM ACTIVE DUTY OR DISCHARGE WILL BE SUBMITTED PER REF D.
(1) THE SEPARATION PROGRAM DESIGNATOR CODE (SPD) FOR ACTIVE DUTY ENLISTED MARINES BEING RELEASED FROM ACTIVE DUTY IS MCC1, REDUCTION IN FORCE. THIS SPD APPLIES TO MARINES THAT HAVE REMAINING OBLIGATED SERVICE OR WISH TO TRANSFER TO THE RESERVES.  REF E, PARAGRAPH 6404.3 PROVIDES THE AUTHORITY FOR THIS SPD.
(2) THE SPD FOR ACTIVE DUTY ENLISTED MARINES BEING DISCHARGED FROM ACTIVE DUTY IS KCC1, REDUCTION IN FORCE.  THIS SPD APPLIES TO MARINES THAT HAVE COMPLETED EIGHT YEARS ACTIVE DUTY OBLIGATED SERVICE AND DO NOT WISH TO TRANSFER TO THE RESERVES.  REF D, PARAGRAPH 6404.3 PROVIDES THE AUTHORITY FOR THIS SPD.
(3) MARINES ALREADY DENIED FURTHER SERVICE WILL RETAIN THE APPROPRIATE SPD CODE AND MUST SUBMIT FOR SEPARATIONS PAY DETERMINATION PER REFS E AND F.
I. RELEASE OF REGULAR ACTIVE ENLISTED MARINES WITH MILITARY SERVICE OBLIGATIONS FROM ACTIVE DUTY WILL BE EFFECTED IN ACCORDANCE WITH REF E.
J. IT IS IMPERATIVE THAT COMMANDS NOTIFY THEIR DISBURSING OFFICERS/FINANCE OFFICERS (DO/FO) REGARDING EACH MARINE’S EARLY SEPARATION PER REF G. THOSE ORGANIZATIONS RESPONSIBLE FOR SEPARATING MARINES ARE REQUIRED TO IMMEDIATELY NOTIFY THE DO/FO VIA A NAVMC 11116 OF THE PENDING SEPARATION.  A NAVMC 11060 MUST THEN BE SUBMITTED TO THE DO/FO WITHIN 5 WORKING DAYS PRIOR TO THE MARINE’S SEPARATION DATE.
8. GENERAL INFORMATION
A. IN THE EVENT OF FUTURE RECALL, MARINES RELEASED UNDER THIS MARADMIN WILL BE CONSIDERED AS BEING IN THE SAME STATUS AS THOSE WHO HAVE COMPLETED THEIR OBLIGATED PERIOD OF ACTIVE DUTY.
B. ENLISTED MARINES SEPARATED UNDER AUTHORITY OF THIS MARADMIN MAY BE AWARDED THE GOOD CONDUCT MEDAL IF THEIR ADJUSTED EAS FALLS WITHIN 90 DAYS OF THEIR 3 YEAR GOOD CONDUCT MEDAL ANNIVERSARY DATE.
C. MARINES WHO ARE ENTITLED TO SEPARATION PAY UPON NORMAL EAS, WHO ELECT, AND ARE APPROVED FOR EARLY RELEASE FROM ACTIVE DUTY UNDER THIS MARADMIN, WILL RETAIN THEIR ENTITLEMENT TO SEPARATION PAY PROVIDED THEY HAVE COMPLETED 6 YEARS OF ACTIVE SERVICE PRIOR TO THE DAY OF EARLY RELEASE (NEW EAS) FROM ACTIVE DUTY. MARINES ARE REMINDED THAT EARLY RELEASE FROM ACTIVE DUTY UNDER THIS MARADMIN COULD AFFECT THE AMOUNT OF THEIR SEPARATION PAY. REFS E AND F PRESCRIBE THE METHOD OF COMPUTING SEPARATION PAY.  FURTHERMORE, IF EARLY RELEASE WOULD DISQUALIFY MARINES FOR SEPARATION PAY DUE TO LENGTH OF SERVICE CRITERIA UNDER THE LAW, MARINES WILL NOT BE RELEASED FROM ACTIVE DUTY UNTIL THEIR SERVICE LENGTH CRITERIA HAS BEEN MET.
D. MARINES WHO ARE ENTITLED TO SEPARATION PAY UPON NORMAL EAS MUST SUBMIT FOR EARLY RELEASE VIA A SEPARATIONS PAY DETERMINATION REQUEST IN THE TOTAL FORCE RETENTION SYSTEM (TFRS).  ALL REQUESTS OVER 90 DAYS FOR EARLY RELEASE WILL BE SUBMITTED WITH AN ENDORSEMENT FROM THE FIRST GENERAL OFFICER IN CHAIN OF COMMAND.
E. MARINES ENTITLED TO SEPARATION BENEFITS ARE AUTHORIZED THOSE BENEFITS IF RELEASED UNDER THIS MARADMIN.  AS A REMINDER, ELIGIBLE MARINES AND THEIR FAMILY MEMBERS DESIRING TO RETAIN TRICARE PRIME UPON SEPARATION ARE REQUIRED TO REENROLL IN TRICARE.
F. MARINES ARE REMINDED TO REVIEW EDUCATIONAL BENEFITS PRIOR TO PARTICIPATING IN VEERP.  A LIST OF ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS FOR THE POST 9-11 GI BILL CAN BE FOUND IN REFS H AND I.  MGIB REQUIREMENTS ARE FOUND IN REF J.
G. ENLISTMENT BONUSES OR SELECTIVE REENLISTMENT BONUSES WILL NOT BE RECOUPED FROM MARINES SEPARATED UNDER THE AUTHORITY OF THIS MARADMIN AS IT IS A FORCE SHAPING MEASURE.
H.  POLICY APPLICABLE TO THE FY15 VEERP WILL BE DISSEMINATED WITH SUFFICIENT TIME FOR FY15 EAS MARINES TO MAKE CAREER AND RETENTION DECISIONS.
9. RESERVE APPLICABILITY. THIS MARADMIN IS NOT APPLICABLE TO THE MARINE CORPS RESERVE.
10. THIS MARADMIN CANCELS ON 30 SEP 2014.
11. RELEASE AUTHORIZED BY LIEUTENANT GENERAL ROBERT E. MILSTEAD, JR. DEPUTY COMMANDANT FOR MANPOWER AND RESERVE AFFAIRS.//

 

[Note: Some people have had trouble accessing the VEERP Spreadsheet on Manpower.usmc.mil. To download a copy of the VEERP Spreadsheet please Click Here.]

My Little Green Book: Page 2

Being an instructor had shown all the promise of independence that a NCO could hope for.  Most good NCOs crave the opportunity to take the initiative in their work, go above and beyond for the cause, and to prove they are a cut above the rest.  This was that opportunity, little did I know there were some SNCOs that had forgotten where they came from, and were not willing to improve upon the system that crushed their initiative and ambition.

As a leader I pride myself on keeping my word to the men under my charge.  I did not sugar-coat anything, and i did not hide the “behind the scenes” whispering that my superiors would do to get us to play games with them.  If my men had questions I answered them with brutal honesty, I remained professional, but as a teacher and a mentor they required a type of honesty that not only opened their eyes to the true nature of the corps, but gave them a reason to trust, or not trust me as their leader.  There was no demand for respect or reminder that “instant obedience to orders” was imperative.  This was teaching marines to be better men, and to think for themselves while giving them an example of how to be professional while telling the truth.

Page 2 is another sample of what everyone drools at the mouth for; someone else’s examples of Marine Corps stupidity and lack of vision.

May 5, 2010:  At the beginning of the training day one of my men is SIQ for the day, the duty instructor knew about this and passed it to our SNCOIC, Gunny Oblivious.  Later that morning while classes are being taught, the rest of the instructor group is hanging out waiting for the next training evolution for the day, when Gunny Oblivious comes into the instructor area, belittles the entire group, while not expressing the actual problem to us, and sends us all to the classroom to be “assistant instructors” for the two instructors teaching.

This became a normal occurrence for our instructor group with Gunny Oblivious, he would constantly come into our area and bitch at us for something, but he had a way of doing so that would never reveal what had happened and what he wanted us to do to correct it or prevent it in the future. These rants occurred every couple of days.

May 5, 2010:  The new Chief Instructor, newly promoted SSGT, leaves around 1654 while the rest of the instructor cadre are left waiting for word after completing the end of training day routine.

(Many times during a training cycle there is a ton of down time for instructors.  If you’re not scheduled for teaching a class or there is no PT for that day you could end up sitting around or literally searching for work to do.  Typically, our counterparts in other companies were allowed to do this, instructors would leave work once they were accounted for and they had no duties for that training day.  Needless to say our instructors never experienced this.  Waiting around for word gave us a constant reminder of our days as E-4 and below standing in a parking lot for hours on end.)

This billet is a leadership position, the supposed best of the instructors, instead the loud-mouthed chest thumper that was promoted to Staff Sergeant first was given the job.  The type of person that would call themselves a leader and then blatantly adopt hypocrisy by doing exactly what his predecessor did to make people despise him.  There is a clear lack of awareness of what leadership is in the Marine Corps as a whole.

May 6, 2010:  Gunny Oblivious orders all instructors to be in the classroom by 0645 on this day, if I recall correctly there was a PT event scheduled for this day.  Our fearless leader never showed for PT, and when he finally did arrive at around 1000 that morning, he was in civilian attire. Later he pulled all his “ones” in for a pow-wow, ones were the more senior instructors both sergeants and staff sergeants, and told them that the other instructors emulated them, and that their attitudes specifically affect morale.

The instructor group, who is responsible for the training schedule, is ordered to print BTRs from MOL for the Chief Instructor.  The Chief Instructor works in a cubicle with the SNCOIC and the OIC, both of which have access to all the staff BTRs.  The instructor staff (12) has one computer in their area.

The lengths that people in leadership positions will go to exercise their authority is amazing to me.  Notice how I worded that last sentence, and I will touch more on this later, “people in leadership positions” not leaders.  In my experience a rocker has a unexplainable affect on the human body’s ability to contain the brain tissue between the ears.  Once the rocker goes on, the brains quickly liquify, and ooze out of the ears of the promoted for a good two months or so.  There are of course lasting effects on the individual after the oozing stops because of the validation that comes from the many that have suddenly become best buds with the promoted.

May 7, 2010:  This day was a field day, a Sergeant Instructor was ordered to standby his room for a field day inspection.  During the training cycle with students on deck as an instructor, this is just a minor complaint, but the implications of treating men like children is monumental here, especially since the individual is a sergeant, instructor, and a person who is entrusted with some pretty serious responsibility.

For the students field day inspections, the other instructors are told to stand by for the Company Commander and 1st Sergeant to go through rooms, at 0800 the Company Gunny rolls through. This is one of those times when it is so obvious that my “leaders” lied to get what they wanted.  I cannot convey how much respect is lost when this happens, it’s catastrophic, I can never believe another word that comes out of your mouth.  Another shining example of bad leadership is to be late to your own appointment as a so-called leader.  When I was a resident college student, prior to my service, I attended a leadership conference for student government.  During this conference an accomplished educator, I do not recall his name, who was a Dean or President of a university told us that one of the worst ways to lose credibility as a leader, before ever stepping in front of a group of people is to keep them waiting.  As a military leader how is this not common sense?  Not only that, but half of the time they don’t even apologize for their blatant hypocrisy.

As a person who strives to conduct themselves as a professional, I have always strived for the next accolade as a Marine.  As a Corporal, I tried to behave as I would as a Sergeant, as a Sergeant I would try to handle myself as if I were a Staff Sergeant.  In this way I completed the next ranks MCI’s way ahead of time.  For example, when I end my service as a Staff Sergeant the required MCI’s to make Gunny were already completed, and I had started working on the next.  There are Gunnys out there who do not even have them yet.  Regardless I wish to quote something from the 8105 MCI titled, Leadership Credo.  “Although  the Marine Corps does not have a formal code of ethics, every Marine leader must have a strong sense of ethical behavior to be worthy of the name.  In combat, ethics are critical for success.”

I find it pointless at all to claim we live by a code of ethics as Marines when it clearly states here that our leaders ethics are as the individual perceives them.  Hopefully someone more intelligent and more articulate will take this and run with it.  My little green book has many other great fallacies of leadership, and just wait a modern day war hero is involved in some of my accounts, although I will not slander his name openly I will gladly share the experiences when we get there.

“The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing.”  – Edmund Burke
Submitted by: “SSGT Samaritan”

My Little Green Book: Page 1

Hello everyone, I found this site early this morning and have lost several hours of sleep because of the excitement it brings me.  I recently ended my active service on May 19th of this year, please no applause. I did eight years as a LAV Crewman, 0313, and tried everyday to make the best of a bad situation.  My career as a Marine ended as the SNCOIC of separations platoon in Camp Pendleton.  I received orders to this unit after challenging the leadership ethics of my previous command, but we’ll get to that later.  Regardless of my decision to do what is right against the more popular road of shady brown nosing, favoritism, and blatant lack of respect for the rules, I still pinned on Staff Sergeant without anyones help.  In the 03 community this is not necessarily an easy feat, although the promotion system is still not based on merit or quality of work as a SNCO. I dropped out of college my senior year to fight in the war, and truly expected to do twenty years as an enlisted man.  It took less than two years for the corruption to rear its head and for my vision of Marine Corps leadership to change drastically.  I served my first three and then some in 29 Palms, enough said, then re-enlisted for those modest, yet useful bonuses in 2009, to be a Combat Instructor.  After Combat Instructor School and a handful of cycles I was really enjoying my time as a Marine for the first time.  This all began to change in less than a year, and my little green book was born.

Throughout college I attended leadership conferences, and participated in campus events and activities; always looking for opportunities to be a better leader.  I grew up by modest means and began working at the age of 13, so character, moral standards, and good ethics are important to me. This did not change when I chose to join the Marines.  Enticed by its world class marketing campaign, I bought into the tiles on the recruiters desk, and looked forward to playing “All-Marine Football”, which had not existed since 2003.  I pride myself on leadership, I jump at the opportunity to take the path less traveled when it comes to developing subordinates; and in the Marine Corps it is not hard to do for the average moral person.  My little green book was born on March 1, 2010, and has dozens of examples of documented leadership brain farts if you will.  There are tales of corruption, simple leadership mistakes with lessons never learned, and some run of the mill bitches, moans, and complaints.  This site is the perfect place for these discretions to be revealed.  The truth must be known.

Please note:  These short accounts began as an evaluation method for improving my leadership methods.

March 1, 2010:  The separation of our instructor cadre begins.  Our SNCOIC, we’ll call him “Gunny Oblivious”, pulls the newly promoted Staff Sergeant Instructors aside for a very exclusive conversation.  Shortly thereafter the Sergeant Instructors are treated differently than before. (Most of these accounts are from my experiences as a Combat Instructor, an individual special duty assignment.  In the course I taught there were only two billets for SNCO’s, all other SNCOs were instructors filling equal billets to Sergeants.)

April 27, 2010:  Pick-up day has arrived, 76 new students are on deck and the cadre begins issuing rooms immediately.  Gunny Oblivious orders the halt of forward progress for impending briefs from Company Commander, Company First Sergeant, OIC, and himself.  He then tells the instructor cadre that no instructor will leave until their students are packed for the field.  The briefs are not given and the instructors begin issuing rooms again; Gunny Oblivious stops this act of initiative and common sense once more.  At 1400 hours that day the room issuing is halted, the students are sent to get briefs, and the instructors are put on “gear watch” of the students gear.  The students return after evening chow, but have not been given any of their briefs and rooms are still not issued.

May 4, 2010:  A Sergeant Instructor is verbally reprimanded for going to his barracks briefly during a lull in training.  Shortly thereafter Gunny Oblivious has a secret meeting with his new SNCOs, and tells them that “Sergeants are not to be trusted; they will walk all over you.”

May 5, 2010:  All test materials are the responsibility of the Chief Instructor, a newly promoted Staff Sergeant, but all test during this week were graded by the instructor group, the Chief Instructor left work early.  One Sergeant instructor was pulled into the office during the entire training day with the Chief.

This is page one, of course these are minor hiccups in day to day life in the Corps, but anyone familiar with the lapse in judgement with MC leadership can see where this small handful of snow is going.  FYI:  At SOI West Standard Operating Procedure for a course is to have one individual who is trained and certified in Curriculum Development handle student test materials to prevent cheating on behalf of instructors who want to give their students an edge.  This makes instructors look better when their students score well, there were daily violations of these policies on behalf of the staff.  Later on you will see how two students answer for their lack of integrity, but company staff disregard integrity altogether.

This site has kept me up all night, I love it.  Now its time for homework and job applications, I cannot wait to hop back on later.

Submitted by: “SSGT Samaritan”.

Berated For Getting Injured, Threatened For Seeing A Doctor

I joined the Marine Corps at the age of 20 after flunking out of college and getting dumped by my girlfriend of two years. Shit was going down the drain real fast and I thought joining the military would solve all my problems. I shipped off to MCRD San Diego in February of 2012. I wasn’t in the best shape in boot camp, as far as running is concerned, and I really didn’t know why. I was a stud on the pull-ups, sit-ups, and every other PT thing you can think of, but I couldn’t run to save my life. This was my drill instructors’ cue to haze the fuck out of me for three months. From the time I picked up with my training company to the time I graduated, I had two hours of fire watch every single night. I was IT’d many times while on fire watch. I was IT’d about six times a day. It didn’t take me long to realize that the reason I was having so much trouble with running was because I had an injury. I went to medical early in first phase and they told me there was nothing wrong with my foot, as they couldn’t see anything on the x-ray. This, obviously, made me an even bigger target for my DIs. They thought I was just weak and didn’t want to put out on runs, so they ramped up my IT sessions even more. It got to the point where I was probably spending more time on the quarterdeck than I was on the drill deck. But, through all of this, I made it through boot camp and became a Marine.

Moving on to MCT, my foot injury got even worse, but there isn’t a whole lot of running at MCT, so I was able to push through it without too much trouble. I didn’t even bother going to medical while at MCT, because I knew the idiot corpsmen couldn’t tell me anything I hadn’t already been told.

Going on to MOS school, my foot became an even worse problem, as my SSgt. liked nothing more than running six miles everyday for PT. I spent a good three months of the 4.5 months I was in MOS school on light duty for what the corpsmen described as a “fracture of my right fibula”. I knew that wasn’t what was wrong with me, so I tried to go to a civilian doctor to get a professional’s opinion on the matter. My SSgt. caught wind of this and told me that if I saw a doctor, he would make my life a living hell. Out of fear for my own safety, I opted not to see a doctor.

As a reservist, I got to go home after MOS school and check into my duty station. I saw a civilian podiatrist for my foot shortly after arriving back home. He diagnosed me with plantar fasciitis. My doctor said he couldn’t put any PT restrictions on me without doing an MRI on my foot, and since I had horrible health insurance at the time, that was out of the question.

I then failed a PFT in April of this year and was chastised by everyone from my platoon sergeant, to company commander for being an out-of-shape bag of ass. I had about reached my breaking point with this whole situation. It was at this point I decided to buy some better health insurance and get that MRI done that my doctor suggested. But before that I had to know what is viatical settlement, because the agent that provided me with the insurance told me that that would be beneficial. I got it done and my doctor described my plantar fascia as irreparably damaged. If I had gotten my foot treated from the outset in boot camp, I would be fine today. But, since I was threatened by my superiors multiple times and never given adequate medical attention by the Naval staff on base, my foot is now permanently messed up. I didn’t think I could use this to get out of the Marine Corps, for whatever reason, so I just told our company corpsman about it and she put me on TNPQ. It was at this point that my company commander called me during the off-time between drills to let me know how much of a bitch I am for not being able to pass a simple PFT with a little old foot injury, when there are Afghanistan veterans with prosthetic legs who can pass it no problem. Breaking point: reached.

I gathered up all the resources I could and found out I could in fact get medical separation for my injury. I never would have known this had I not done my own research, as our Doc didn’t feel that was pertinent information for me. I’m now in the process of being medically separated. I hate the Marine Corps.

Submitted by: “No, Thanks”

“I Am Sorry That It Has Come to This”: A Soldier’s Last Words

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Daniel Somers was a veteran of Operation Iraqi Freedom. He was part of Task Force Lightning, an intelligence unit. In 2004-2005, he was mainly assigned to a Tactical Human-Intelligence Team (THT) in Baghdad, Iraq, where he ran more than 400 combat missions as a machine gunner in the turret of a Humvee, interviewed countless Iraqis ranging from concerned citizens to community leaders and and government officials, and interrogated dozens of insurgents and terrorist suspects. In 2006-2007, Daniel worked with Joint Special Operations Command (JSOC) through his former unit in Mosul where he ran the Northern Iraq Intelligence Center. His official role was as a senior analyst for the Levant (Lebanon, Syria, Jordan, Israel, and part of Turkey). Daniel suffered greatly from PTSD and had been diagnosed with traumatic brain injury and several other war-related conditions. On June 10, 2013, Daniel wrote the following letter to his family before taking his life. Daniel was 30 years old. His wife and family have given permission to publish it.

I am sorry that it has come to this.

The fact is, for as long as I can remember my motivation for getting up every day has been so that you would not have to bury me. As things have continued to get worse, it has become clear that this alone is not a sufficient reason to carry on. The fact is, I am not getting better, I am not going to get better, and I will most certainly deteriorate further as time goes on. From a logical standpoint, it is better to simply end things quickly and let any repercussions from that play out in the short term than to drag things out into the long term.

You will perhaps be sad for a time, but over time you will forget and begin to carry on. Far better that than to inflict my growing misery upon you for years and decades to come, dragging you down with me. It is because I love you that I can not do this to you. You will come to see that it is a far better thing as one day after another passes during which you do not have to worry about me or even give me a second thought. You will find that your world is better without me in it.

I really have been trying to hang on, for more than a decade now. Each day has been a testament to the extent to which I cared, suffering unspeakable horror as quietly as possible so that you could feel as though I was still here for you. In truth, I was nothing more than a prop, filling space so that my absence would not be noted. In truth, I have already been absent for a long, long time.

My body has become nothing but a cage, a source of pain and constant problems. The illness I have has caused me pain that not even the strongest medicines could dull, and there is no cure. All day, every day a screaming agony in every nerve ending in my body. It is nothing short of torture. My mind is a wasteland, filled with visions of incredible horror, unceasing depression, and crippling anxiety, even with all of the medications the doctors dare give. Simple things that everyone else takes for granted are nearly impossible for me. I can not laugh or cry. I can barely leave the house. I derive no pleasure from any activity. Everything simply comes down to passing time until I can sleep again. Now, to sleep forever seems to be the most merciful thing.

You must not blame yourself. The simple truth is this: During my first deployment, I was made to participate in things, the enormity of which is hard to describe. War crimes, crimes against humanity. Though I did not participate willingly, and made what I thought was my best effort to stop these events, there are some things that a person simply can not come back from. I take some pride in that, actually, as to move on in life after being part of such a thing would be the mark of a sociopath in my mind. These things go far beyond what most are even aware of.

To force me to do these things and then participate in the ensuing coverup is more than any government has the right to demand. Then, the same government has turned around and abandoned me. They offer no help, and actively block the pursuit of gaining outside help via their corrupt agents at the DEA. Any blame rests with them.

Beyond that, there are the host of physical illnesses that have struck me down again and again, for which they also offer no help. There might be some progress by now if they had not spent nearly twenty years denying the illness that I and so many others were exposed to. Further complicating matters is the repeated and severe brain injuries to which I was subjected, which they also seem to be expending no effort into understanding. What is known is that each of these should have been cause enough for immediate medical attention, which was not rendered.

Lastly, the DEA enters the picture again as they have now managed to create such a culture of fear in the medical community that doctors are too scared to even take the necessary steps to control the symptoms. All under the guise of a completely manufactured “overprescribing epidemic,” which stands in stark relief to all of the legitimate research, which shows the opposite to be true. Perhaps, with the right medication at the right doses, I could have bought a couple of decent years, but even that is too much to ask from a regime built upon the idea that suffering is noble and relief is just for the weak.

However, when the challenges facing a person are already so great that all but the weakest would give up, these extra factors are enough to push a person over the edge.

Is it any wonder then that the latest figures show 22 veterans killing themselves each day? That is more veterans than children killed at Sandy Hook, every single day. Where are the huge policy initiatives? Why isn’t the president standing with those families at the state of the union? Perhaps because we were not killed by a single lunatic, but rather by his own system of dehumanization, neglect, and indifference.

It leaves us to where all we have to look forward to is constant pain, misery, poverty, and dishonor. I assure you that, when the numbers do finally drop, it will merely be because those who were pushed the farthest are all already dead.

And for what? Bush’s religious lunacy? Cheney’s ever growing fortune and that of his corporate friends? Is this what we destroy lives for

Since then, I have tried everything to fill the void. I tried to move into a position of greater power and influence to try and right some of the wrongs. I deployed again, where I put a huge emphasis on saving lives. The fact of the matter, though, is that any new lives saved do not replace those who were murdered. It is an exercise in futility.

Then, I pursued replacing destruction with creation. For a time this provided a distraction, but it could not last. The fact is that any kind of ordinary life is an insult to those who died at my hand. How can I possibly go around like everyone else while the widows and orphans I created continue to struggle? If they could see me sitting here in suburbia, in my comfortable home working on some music project they would be outraged, and rightfully so.

I thought perhaps I could make some headway with this film project, maybe even directly appealing to those I had wronged and exposing a greater truth, but that is also now being taken away from me. I fear that, just as with everything else that requires the involvement of people who can not understand by virtue of never having been there, it is going to fall apart as careers get in the way.

The last thought that has occurred to me is one of some kind of final mission. It is true that I have found that I am capable of finding some kind of reprieve by doing things that are worthwhile on the scale of life and death. While it is a nice thought to consider doing some good with my skills, experience, and killer instinct, the truth is that it isn’t realistic. First, there are the logistics of financing and equipping my own operation, then there is the near certainty of a grisly death, international incidents, and being branded a terrorist in the media that would follow. What is really stopping me, though, is that I simply am too sick to be effective in the field anymore. That, too, has been taken from me.

Thus, I am left with basically nothing. Too trapped in a war to be at peace, too damaged to be at war. Abandoned by those who would take the easy route, and a liability to those who stick it out—and thus deserve better. So you see, not only am I better off dead, but the world is better without me in it

This is what brought me to my actual final mission. Not suicide, but a mercy killing. I know how to kill, and I know how to do it so that there is no pain whatsoever. It was quick, and I did not suffer. And above all, now I am free. I feel no more pain. I have no more nightmares or flashbacks or hallucinations. I am no longer constantly depressed or afraid or worried

I am free.

I ask that you be happy for me for that. It is perhaps the best break I could have hoped for. Please accept this and be glad for me.

Daniel Somers

[Photo via Gettypremium]

Source: Gawker.com

Underage Drinking Problems… What Can I Do?

I’m a 19 year old PFC, I never had a drinking problem before until now. I’ve been in for around a year and my drinking habit increased from drinking just beers to liquor. I drink every day. How can I solve my drinking problem without getting fucked…

Submitted by: PFC MOTO

NINJA_PUNCH’s Response:

This is honestly one of the trickiest situations I’ve come across. Let me say right off the bat that I looked over the relevant orders, and they tend to be very vague when it comes to underage drinking.

That being said, you made a smart move by coming here and asking for advice. Acknowledging that you have a problem, and asking for help are two huge steps, and the fact that were willing to do those by yourself tells me that you probably have the wherewithal to handle this problem without needing formal “Alcoholic’s Anonymous” style counseling. My advice to you is to start by trying to overcome this problem yourself, without involving your command. If you can get it under control without involving the command, then what they don’t know won’t hurt them.

Without knowing anything about you or your situation, here are a few methods I would recommend using to attempt to control your drinking:

  1. Make some new friends: Try to either meet some people off base, or maybe even try to find a non-drinker on base who you can hang out with. They can help you find things that you can do that don’t involve drinking.
  2. Go for a walk at night: It can be just around your area, or you can pick a road and just start walking until you feel like turning around. You can put in your iPod and listen to some tunes while you walk. You could easily spend over an hour walking around, discovering new parts of the base that you might’ve walked past a hundred times and I never notice before. On top of that, just getting away from the barracks and all of the people you work with, and just going for a walk by yourself can be a good way to relieve stress.
  3. Go to the movies: If you’re already spending $10-$20, why not take that money, and go get a bunch of candy at the movies and spend 2-3 hours there instead of getting drunk? Plus going to the movies is also a good way of unwinding, so you may not want to drink as much.
  4. Turn Sobriety into a Game: Keep a record of how long you go in between drinks, and how many drinks you have if you do drink. Then set a goal for how long you want to go without a drink, or how few drinks you want to have. When you meet that goal set another one. Repeat for as long as is necessary.
  • Note: If you do keep a record – whether it’s in a book or on your computer – DO NOT put any alcohol related words anywhere in the record. The last thing you need is to accidentally leave the book out or the computer open, and have the wrong person see it, and suddenly you’re getting busted for trying to improve yourself.

Granted this isn’t a comprehensive list – and I’m sure you can come up with more ways to stay sober – but those are a few ideas to get you started. If you give these an honest effort and you’re still struggling, I’d recommend trying to go to either Mental Health or SACO. Unfortunately I can’t guarantee that you won’t get burned for going to Mental Health or SACO with underage drinking. If I had to pick one, I’d try Mental Health first. They’re run by the Navy instead of the marine corps, and most of the employees are civilians so there’s less of a chance of getting burned for it than if you went to the SACO. However, going to the SACO and saying that you have a problem, is still going to be better than if you have an “alcohol-related incident” and then go see the SACO.

I hope this is helpful to you, and if you have any other questions please feel free to ask.

Safety and Peace

NINJA_PUNCH

United States Marine Corps’ Recruit Separation Platoon

I walked into Recruit Separation Platoon on October 23rd 2009. As always I barely had any idea of what was going on while being at Parris Island. RSP consists of a Squad bay in the main receiving building on Parris Island. When you enter RSP you hand over most of your military equipment because you don’t need it anymore. I turned in all my digital camouflage. I was assigned to rack 89 which was right next to the drill instructor house. I was given a pair of dull green sweatpants and matching sweat shirt. I was also given a glow strap and war belt. (belt that holds two canteens). I then filled out paperwork at the tables next to the scribe desk. I filled out general information about myself and where the closest Greyhound bus station was to my house. Still being somewhat new to Parris Island I was shaky on all the rules and proper way to act. When you are in RSP you are still considered a recruit and you need to conduct yourself as such. Many new recruits who enter RSP don’t comprehend this very well.

The Standard day in RSP consists of waking up at 5:00 AM. We all then line up in front of our racks and count off. If we mess up we start over. We are then instructed to start “hygiene”. Morning hygiene is supposed to consist of brushing your teeth and shaving. However many recruits would skip the shave because while I was at RSP for my two and a half weeks we only had hygiene inspection twice. Racks are also supposed to be made “tight” in the morning. This means you need to make your bed in the marine fashion. 45 degree corners on the sheets at the head of the bed and 45 degree corners at the end of the rack on the green wool blanket. Lastly the sheet needs to be folded down from the head 18 inches. My rack looked like crap for the first few days and then I started to get the hang of it. After everyone finishes hygiene and making their racks we line up for chow. Everyone puts on their war belt and glow strap ( yellow reflective strap that goes from left shoulder to right hip.) Then we go next door to line up at the back hatch in the PEB (Physical Evaluation Board) squad bay. PEB recruits are recruits who become seriously injured and are also working on getting home except their paperwork goes to D.C. and takes them about 2-4 months (guess) to get home. We line up in columns of two in front of that hatch on average there was about 90 to 100 recruits at one time including PEB recruits. (80 RSP – 20 PEB) We would wait for a bus or two to come pick us up to bring us to chow hall. The Waiting factor in RSP is what makes you crazy and feel like you are there for an eternity. My guess is that we would be waiting in line for up 30 – 45 minutes. We all then would get on the Bus and “crush it”. crushing it consists of interlocking legs and pushing down towards the end of the bus in order to fit the most recruits possible. The busses had Plexiglas windows that were very scratched. They also had benches in the middle and edges that were parallel to the bus.

When we arrive at the chow hall we get off the bus and get into a formation of 4 columns with the 4 squad leaders at the front facing their line. We then will file ourselves off one column at a time into the chow hall. We then would usually wait in line at the chow hall for 15- 40 minutes for chow to be ready. The etiquette for getting chow is pretty simple. The guide will instruct the next 3 rows (6 recruits) to detach out ever 2 minutes or so. You will then get chow and place it at a table. Then you go up and get your drink. After chow we will head back to the squad bay and count off again. The drill instructor would then instruct us to “turn to cleanup” cleanup consists of all the RSP recruits getting cleaning equipment ( brooms, scuzz brushes, metal polish, cleaning spray, dust pans, and others.) The recruits then split up making sure they all have their war belt and glow strap on. Recruits can leave the squad bay and clean around the whole building. Cleaning will take anywhere from 15 minutes to and hour. After we finished cleaning we would head back to the RSP squad bay and sit on our foot lockers. If we have been following the rules then we will “turn to free time” If not we sit on the quarterdeck. During free time we were allowed to read, write letters, and talk quietly. During my first few days I would talk to recruits to figure out what was going on and what was going to happen. Here is what I learned

The recruit who enters RSP is only supposed to be in RSP for 7 to 10 business days once they have been cleared by medical.

A “sleep over” is a recruit in RSP who cannot go down to be cleared by medical because his medical records have not reached the medical building yet.

I was a sleep over for one week. I got cleared by medical on November 2nd. After you get cleared by medical you can try to calm down because you are pretty much going to be going home no later than 2 weeks.

After morning free time the whole process starts over again. We go to chow, come back, clean, free time, go to chow, clean , and have free time again.

About an hour before we go to bed we will do evening hygiene. Evening hygiene consists of brushing teeth, shaving and taking a shower. We would then count off and hit the rack at 8 pm as the 5 fire watch recruits are called.

One of the most depressing things about being in RSP is fire watch. I hated being woken up at 11 or 1 in the morning to stand at a post with a flashlight for an hour. You simply stand there and think “Wow it really sucks to be waiting around here like this”. We then will wake up at 5 am and the day starts over again.

I left on November 10th I was pretty relieved to finally put my civilian clothes on after wearing sweat pants for two and a half weeks.

There is barely any information on the Recruit Separation Platoon online. I am hoping this information helps anyone who is thinking about enlisting who wishes to get the most information they can about the US Marine corps .

 

Source: James Douglas

A Short-Timer’s Cadence

This was a cadence that I wrote back in 2011 when I was leaving Okinawa. We had two short-timers in my squad, and we were a tad bit upset at still having to PT (Face it, no one likes to PT, the only reason people do it is because they have to), and we had a new squad leader who had… lets call them “unorthodox” ways of conducting PT. So during the middle of a 4 mile, “boots and utes”, cadence, indian run, (Yes we seriously did that) I got out and started shouting this little number. Enjoy.

747 rollin’ down the strip
EAS [Or “PCS” works too] marines gonna take a little trip
Roommates gonna field day alone
But I don’t care ’cause i’m going home

Wake up, stand up shuffle to the door
McDonalds for lunch and home by 4
A-laughing and a-joking
A-drinking and a-smoking

Civilians! Hell Ya!
Marine Corps! Fuck Off!

 

Safety and Peace

NINJA_PUNCH

Children’s Boot Camp: More Than Machinery, We Need Humanity

Source

When I started watching this video, and I saw the warning that “images may be disturbing to some viewers”, I initially thought “Whatever. I have thick skin, I’ll be fine.” Needless to say I was not prepared for this video at all. Initially, I was ok, wondering why the kid’s face was blurred out, and why he looked like he was crying.  As the screen zoomed out, I noticed the tire around his shoulders, and the female instructor shouting at him. At this point I was still ok. I figured it was some kind of mini boot camp, and he just looked like he was crying because he’d been training hard and was nearing exhaustion. But then the camera zoomed out further and I saw the three other instructors shouting various commands at him and screaming at him from only inches away from his face. Just as I was beginning to think, “Ok, this is getting excessive,” the kid let out a scream that ought to make any decent human being’s blood run cold; but the instructors didn’t let up, and actually got a bit louder to shout over the kid’s screams. The kid fell to the ground and still the instructors didn’t let up. Eventually he gets back up, and takes a couple of steps, and lets out a series of screams that are just a blood curdling as the first, and that continue until the end of the clip.

I opened up this window, and then sat there for a solid twenty minutes as I vainly tried to wrap my mind around what I had just watched. Surely I saw similar things on a fairly regular basis during boot camp, but seeing this happen to a child of only 13 or 14 years of age, and in this context, was different. In an actual boot camp, there is the excuse that inducing stress in this manner is essential to training because it simulates the stress of combat. Whether or not this excuse is actually a justification for this sort of behavior in boot camp is a topic for another paper; however, it is clearly not a justification in this context. Consider for a moment where they are: this is a physical fitness camp for children and teens. How does ordering this kid to say “I love my sergeant” or “aye aye sir” or any of that help him become more fit? In fact, how does trying to induce this kind of stress in any manner help this kid become more physically fit?

Sure if you watch the TV show “The Biggest Loser” Jillian Michaels can be a bit over the top, but if you notice, she tends to be constructive in her criticisms. She tries to inspire the contestants to keep going in order to improve themselves. Swarming this kid and ordering him to say, “I love my sergeant” etc. etc. and continuing to apply psychological pressure long after the kid has obviously broken, has less in common with “The Biggest Loser” than it has with the abuses at Abu Ghraib in 2003 and 2004.

Despite all this, what really struck me about this video was not so much the obvious psychological distress that this kid was being placed under, as it was the realization that none of the instructors had any sort of compassion or showed any remorse when the kid finally broke down. This is the very essence of dehumanization in the military; the dehumanization doesn’t stop with turning the “enemy” into a subhuman caricature, but continues on and spills over to render military subordinates, recruits, and apparently even children, as being less than human and undeserving of even basic human regard.

To sum up I will quote Charlie Chaplin in the movie “The Great Dictator”:

  • “More than machinery we need humanity. More than cleverness we need kindness and gentleness. Without these qualities, life will be violent and all will be lost… Soldiers! Don’t give yourselves to brutes! Men who despise you, enslave you, who regiment your lives, tell you what to do, what to think and what to feel! Who drill you, diet you, treat you like cattle, use you as cannon fodder! Don’t give yourselves to these unnatural men – machine men with machine minds and machine hearts! You are not machines! You are not cattle! You are men! You have the love of humanity in your hearts. You don’t hate! Only the unloved hate – the unloved and the unnatural!”

This is the message that all troops need to hear. All of the hardness and toughness in the world is worth nothing if you have no love of humanity. All of the fighting for some abstract concept of a “country” is meaningless if you’re willing to torment the people who make up the country that you’re trying to defend.

Safety and Peace

NINJA_PUNCH

Marine Road-Rages after fender bender. No better friend?

 

 

After watching this video, I was initially shocked at how this guy could’ve been so incredibly… inhospitable (among other things); however, after further review, this really seems like a perfect validation of the mindset that is fostered in the marine corps, and the military in general.

If there’s one motto that I’ve heard used to convey a marine’s sense of always being in the right more than any other, it’s the phrase “no better friend, no worse enemy”.  The phrase is usually used to assert that marines are utter gentlemen (or ladies, since many marines are female) around innocent civilians and fellow troops, but at the same time they’re absolute badasses who could kill every generic, “Hollywood bad-guy” in the world before breakfast and without breaking a sweat.

Ok, perhaps that’s a bit of a stretch, but the phrase does obviously imply that marines are harmless to innocent people, while being lethal to “evildoers”. The obvious implication of such a claim is that individual marines have the maturity and psychological wherewithal, both to identify who is a friend and who is a foe, and to turn their aggression on and off accordingly.

But with videos such as this one – depicting a marine threatening to beat two people, one of them a fellow marine, over a fender bender – becoming more and more common, is this really a justified belief? Can we really ask people who have been subjected to the kind of mental conditioning required to turn other human beings into a dehumanized “enemy” that must be utterly destroyed, to magically be able to turn that training off?

Can we realistically say that videos like this are the product of “a few bad apples”, or is it more likely that they’re the product of a “bad barrel”? Is this marine just a jackass who has always been prone to violent outbursts at the slightest provocation? Is he just a “bad apple” in an otherwise good “barrel” known as the military? Or is this a normal man, who was MADE this way by years of being desensitized to the thought of others being anything more than an anonymous “enemy”? Is he a normal “apple” that was placed into a “bad barrel” and was MADE into a “bad apple”?

Countless psychological studies – especially the Stanford Prison Experiment  – have shown the latter case to be more likely; it is far easier to be manipulated by the power of a situation than we would like to believe. It is very easy for a man to be made into a monster, or – as we see in this instance – for what was probably once a fairly calm and collected person to be made into a raving lunatic; especially when subjected to a culture that not only endorses the use of violence, but actively encourages killing other people to achieve its goals.

This knowledge does not exonerate this man for flying off the handle, but what it does show us is that the blame for such instances extends far beyond the individual committing it, to the military institution as a whole. It becomes the fault of not only the individual, but of the superiors who encourage this sort of behavior and help to create an environment that allows this sort of behavior to flourish.

The Military Police may have arrested this man, and he may be punished for his actions, but until the environment of the military institution is fundamentally altered, these individual punishments can never have the desired effect.

Safety and Peace

NINJA_PUNCH

“Marine Corps Early Retirement Programs”

Just for the luls.

Safety and Peace

MARINE MARRIAGE SCAM PAYS $31,200 IN YEARLY SALARY BUMP

Hope Hodge of Marine Times, seems to have uncovered a bit of juicy news that illustrates another incredible consequence of the governments insistence on social engineering. But this time, instead of giant credits being given to tax payers for electrical cars (much of which resulted in the purchasing of brand new golf carts) this time it’s marines taking advantage of the benefits given to them when they get married. The story is behind a paywall and most of you, I imagine, don’t subscribe to this well-respected, but largely unknown publication. So I’ll give you a little insight into what is in her 2500 word story.

She outlines the story of Lance Corp. Donald A. Mitchem. Mitchem who got married for to an illegal from Ghana in exchange for a few thousand dollars, a significant bump in pay, and his dignity. After their courthouse wedding, they went to their separate cars, and drove off, never to see one another again. Romantic right?

How much do Marines make when they get married?

Well, their base pay increase is between aroudn $1100 per month and $2,000 per month depending on where they are stationed. They are (or at least Mitchem was) eligible for a $350 stipend earmarked for food and such, and since the marriage was a sham and Mitchem did not live near his beautiful wife, he was given $250 in exchange for the hardship that the separation caused. That brings the total to somewhere between a $1700 and $2600 bump in pay EACH MONTH. That’s right, taxpayers are paying marines who are working the system between 20,400 and 31,200 each year in extra take-home pay.

Isn’t it great when government creates incentives?

Source: Bredred.com

Ramblings of a motivator.

Hmmm lets see have you lost family a friend a loved one to the attack on 911 orr the beheadings or countless other things the taliban has done to civilians out along the entire UNITED STATES OF AMERICA an all the armed forces you goin to moan an groan about the MARINES urinateing on dead taliban if it was me soldier or civilian i would done more then urinate on them SORRY I AM A PROUD AMERICAN an stand behind our soldiers without them we wouldnt be free only stupidity f people who would open a site like this where were the peace lovers when the towers f where they when our civilans were over there tryin tto help rebuild an got beheaded hmmmmm seems to me to see that versus a lil urination say people who back a page like this either are not AMERICANS or have no respect for the soldiers there or it may been your family or lovedd one that got urinated on in which case welcome to the world many of us PROUD AMERICANS LIVE IN with lost family friends an loved ones shameless disgraced by stupidity i know with in 5 min this message will be deleleted or bashed or crititised or grammer or something other stupid crap but either way none of you were there before i go i must say this loud an proud SEMPERI FI

Submitted by: non judgemental

Med Board, 80% Disability, Jealous NCO’s and more!

I got medically discharged with an 80% disability rating, I get 400 bucks a week from unemployment and I get almost 1700 bucks from my GI bill every month. Why am I telling you this? Because I used to be a motivated idiot who thought it was an honorable thing to put up with the moronic faggots who were in charge of me until I came back from Afghanistan. Then when I was told that I was to be put on a med board all hell broke loos, jealousy from lazy ass lcpls who think they are entitled to the world and bitch ass ncos from fast company that never deployed who depended on those same lcpls to suck their dicks and boost their egos. People tried to set shit up and tried to get me njp’d because they didn’t want me getting out wih benefits. Nothing ever stuck because I was innocent. Ssgts in RBE would brag about how many people they kicked out of he marine corps with no benefits and how they could have helped them instead but opted not to. “leaders” telling their marines they were off for the day only to call hem later and tell them they were not off work and when they came back they had charge papers waiting for them. People getting charged UA because they went to their medical appointments. All the stupid fucking mind games, formations being held just to humiliate and belittle marines that were on medical boards, punishing the majority for the fuck ups made by the minority. Whatever, I’m out now enjoying all my benefits to the fullest. Don’t have to worry about health insurance for my family because I still have tricare and I can still fly space-a so I take vacations whenever the fuck I want. And I laugh because when i was still in I felt bad for being on a med board and guilty that I was getting disability and benefits, but now I will enjoy them to the fullest. Fuck you marine corps, you tried to fuck me but in the end I came out the winner. I burned all my uniforms in a bonfire in the backyard of my lovely house that I got with my VA loan.

 

Submitted by: Thats_pretty_brutal

Hazers got busted down and passed up in rank by the hazed

So when I came in the guys in charge of us hazed us, now my peers are Team leaders and when they hazed their boots the boots did the right thing and snitched on them for lack of a better term. Now they are all butthurt because they got njp’d, demoted, put on restriction and are getting treated like shit and being made an example of, while the boots are picking up and filling their spots. The funniest thing is that my peers’ original teamleaders who deem themselves all high and mighty don’t give a shit about my peers and are not doing jack shit to help out their marines. Instead they are being lazy, sitting in their rooms either sleeping or playing COD all day and skating out of everything while they check out of the marine corps. Great way to set the example, semper fucks!

Submitted by: Eff emm ell

Trying to take terminal

I’ve been in the Marines for over 5 years, 4 of those in the ‘fleet’, and did 3 deployments, 2 for the squadron I’m currently in. This week is suppose to be all about me checking out and getting ready to go on terminal in 4 days. Today my Ssgt tells me that terminal leave is a privilege not a guarantee (I know this already), and that he’s thinking about canceling my Terminal because I failed a room inspection I wasn’t even present for nor knew about. (Even then my room is always presentable, they failed me on dust and carpet not vacuumed). And he tells me a piece of shit that has never cared, nor will start to care so he’s well in his right to cancel my terminal. Yet… I went out of my way to get a collateral billet to help our work center out, trained younger Marines to be better at their job, unlike other NCOs who sit on their ass and do nothing, and back in 2010 I go bumped to another squadron to go on a MEU, and once it was done I came back to this squadron because our work center was hurting for collateral billets, and to ice the cake… I extended my contract 4 months to make this last deployment, so my other collateral billet buddies wouldn’t be over stressed and I could help out, because those are the few that I consider my brothers in this squadron. Yet, I’m a piece of shit? Who has never cared? I give this squadron over 3 years of my time, and a 4 month extention… and it can’t even give me 30 days of terminal leave… are you fucking kidding me.

Submitted by: Chainhearteffect

20 year E-6

I spent 20 years in the Marines and retired as an E6, was NJPed on Recruiting duty and told it wouldn’t matter as long as I was successful. Well, made it successfully on Recruiting duty, went to Iraq and still retired as an E6. Was passed over I think 7 times total. Did I think the Marine Corps was biased? YES!!! but I was not a politically correct person while I was in. I hated many years of the time I was in, but also loved times. The Marines are not for everyone and if you cant follow rules prior to going in, DONT go in.

Superior Supermen – The Marine Corps Mentality

I’d like to address a few issues that may seem a bit “out there;” but they’re still important to highlight because it reveals the USMC endorsement of an interesting ideal. Beneath the veneer of what most would call a fairly simple philosophy exists an almost sacramental worldview that has, unfortunately, dismantled almost everything to which the Corps aspires. It is these lapses that should serve as a warning to young people that envision a USMC of reason, moderation, and logic. To begin, I’m a firm believer that “frustration is part of the process.” Frustration is good! Frustration while fixing your car, learning a new trade, reading a difficult book or dealing with an idiosyncratic person is part and parcel to becoming better at life. Frustration builds character. Frustration makes you stronger. Marines love to attach this fact to the rigors of daily life in the Corps by listing the existing challenges and insisting that it’s all good for you. But I beg to differ. In real life, frustration is part of the process. In the USMC, frustration seems to be the goal with no substantial payoff in the end.

In the eyes of the Corps:
– a pt session that begins before the sun rises isn’t sufficient. You need to be yelling at the top of your lungs to demonstrate to your superiors that you’re motivated. Why?
– on Monday morning, your neat and tidy low regulation haircut is an indicator to the SNCOs that you’re not as motivated as you should be. You’re wrong. Why?
– projecting your voice in a manner that allows everyone concerned to hear you is not good enough. You must be louder, even if it’s overkill. Why?
– long and tedious room inspections are somehow analogous to success on the battlefield. Why?
And the list goes on. The main point is that Marines believe everything can be improved upon, even if the subsequent measures make no sense. It’s part of their mentality to be a superior breed of men, even if this brand of superiority is sustained on an intangible and unseen dimension. This reminds me of someone.
Ah, yes- Nietzsche. For you philosophy buffs out there, don’t get the wrong idea about where I’m going with this. I’m not suggesting Marines believe God is dead (far from it), nor am I saying they endorse collectivism. But there are some stark similarities between the man and this institution. Nietzsche created two theories that resonate strongly with the Marines; 1. the Overman, or Superman mentality, which shatters the limitations society has placed on people with extraordinary potential, and 2. tapping into man’s basest instincts. The first theory need not be explained- most everyone will agree that a real Marine pursues his goals with maniacal zeal, and in many respects that should be admired. But there is a backlash, and that comes by way of tapping into the deepest recesses of man’s primal desires in an unrestrained fashion.
The reason why the USMC is now a two-steps-forward-one-step back institution is that they have not yet married the concepts of reason and zeal within the enlisted ranks. Moderation. Marines have a reputation for being the best fighters, runners, lovers and workers due to their love for the Corps. Even though this really isn’t true, it’s a theme they’ve embraced. I’m going to drop another bomb here, and again, it’s not what you might think. Adolf Hitler believed that if you’re going to endorse an ideology, you need to abandon any and all “contemplation” on the issue and embrace it entirely. Balls-to-the- wall energy and passion is the order of the day. What does this rhetoric remind you of? But he also celebrated the lapses his adversaries suffered from by not taking the time to THINK. I suppose I should explain that I’m not calling Marines Nazis, nor am I an adherent to any kind of racial superiority. If you’re going to attack this argument, at least be fair about it.
There is a disconnect running rampant in the Corps, and it’s found most acutely in POG Land. Some of you may be wondering why POGs are some of the most infamous motards. It’s because they’re operating under a distorted view of what it means to be a Marine on the universal level, regardless of how they view it individually. I was an enlisted POG. There is a greater balance between Motivation and Diligence being advocated among the commissioned ranks; so what kind of indictment does this bring down on the enlisted ranks, particularly the POGs? In POG Land, reasonable and mature behavior eclipses college fraternity antics by an unacceptable margin. That 10% is more like 20%, and frankly I think the 10% theory is a cop-out. Conversely, the Commandant of the Marine Corps, who has most likely gone to War College and is classically educated doesn’t tell his commanders to execute a battle plan without a sound strategy. The motivation is effective because he’s attached it to a repertoire of skills his men already possess. In the enlisted ranks, in my experience, it was the opposite: “motivation” was given as a prerequisite in order to accomplish whatever menial task that was assigned for the day.
So I am tempted to say the commissioned ranks are part Nietzsche/part Plato, which is an almost perfect marriage of existence. Nietzsche accused his fellow Germans of thinking too much while Plato encouraged deconstruction and logic. The enlisted ranks are mostly Nietzsche, if you’ll follow the analogy in its proper context (in this sense I’m labeling many enlisted POGs as reactionary and purely instinctual). The Corps is doing its job at the “tip of the tip of the spear” in an effective manner, where the execution of the combat mission is most crucial. But it’s doing something wrong at the lower levels, which is an injustice to many enlisted Marines who are absolutely brilliant at their respective jobs and deserve a reprieve from the childishness of “motivation.” We’re not talking about intellectualism here, where a butter bar who has majored in English literature is pretending to be superior to a LCPL on his third deployment. The issue here is fusing the berserker-like persona of a PFC with the maturity and knowledge of an officer. THAT is the definition of a real Marine, but so few exist.
So to whom am I assigning responsibility for this? If you track down the epidemiology of this “disease” of motardedness, it lies squarely on the shoulders of the SNCOs and the lower recruiting standards. It’s a combination of their lack of combat experience, a lot of overcompensation by way of their self-styled motard antics, and the disillusionment of just waiting for retirement. For a lot of SNCOs, it’s just not fun anymore. As for the latter issue, the standard for the enlistment quotas have gone down the toilet. How can you expect a depraved pedophile, ex con, or juvenile delinquent to learn anything when his superior could be a depraved pedophile, ex con, or juvenile delinquent? You can’t expect optimum results when one cross-eyed nitwit is leading a gaggle of cross-eyed nitwits.

Busted down from E-5 to E-3 for reporting hazing

I am getting fucked by my command I was doing grate in the corps I was a Cpl reenlisted and made Sgt when my command njp’d me for correcting three of my piers and a Ssgt for the treatment of our marines they where hazing and I wasent going to stand for it I spoke up expecting the problem to be solved it wasent and I got busted down to Lcpl and when I got busted down they hazed me harder than I’ve ever seen them haze anyone I took it up the chain of command (Coc) three time’s I took it to the Chaplan several times it didnt matter nobody cared so I am currently facing court martial where I will bring to light all of the wrongs that have been comitted

Submitted by: ninja kick

I reported hazing and now life is going to be hell.

My command is bullshit, I’m with the MEU and I got hazed twice, but I spoke up for myself and got them reprimanded and they’re on deployment now so I still got a couple months before they get back. A couple of buddies I know got word of them saying because of what happened now my life is going to be hell and I just want to get out of this unit but I’m scared if I request mass nothing will be done about it based off of what I seen. I just want to keep my record clean and do my 4 years with my head held high and get the FUCK OUT. I see the Corps for what it is and only the ass-kissers truly make it up the ranks so I’m getting out. Please help me; I want to leave this unit and they drove me to see a Psychiatrist cause’ I’m always getting picked on and singled out. I don’t know what to do but I can’t stay here because the slightest fuck up and they’re definitely going to charge my ass. What can I do? Thanks!

-Semper FuckTheUSMC

Submitted by: Tactfully belligerent

I was hazed, need advice

Hello everyone i am a pfc in the marines corps ive been in the fleet now for about 6 months im a 0331 machine gunner long story short my unit got back from afgahanistan immediatly after i gt to the fleet i was hazed for about 2 months untilll finally after an incedent getting physically assaulted i turned it in since then there has been an investigation to where marines are supposedly getting held accountable njp and i also have been severly depressed because of this horrible enviorment im constantly tormented especially after doing the right thing and reporting hazing now im that bitch who cryed hazing so ive been reccomended by a navy medical officer to get admin seperation due to my depression and anxiety of being here and they told me i was on my way out now my co and bc are saying they want me to stay and think im salvagble i want nothing to do with the corps i hate this place im tired of constantly playing this my dicks bigger competition im almost being forced now to go ua

Submitted by: jones0331

As a Marine I understand some of your frustrations

As a Marine I understand some of your frustrations, and we ALL did field day and dealt with the bullshit but all in all I got to see a shitload of countries as an embassy guard (cuz I was motivated enough to strive for something I thought was interesting and worthwhile and other than a barracks) after being a a combat engineer for 2 years. I nailed a whole wide world of eastern European chicks, held down an embassy during a revolution and left with a letter of recommendation from an Ambassador thats helped out alot in my professional career. I got money for school and now I’m an engineer with one of the top 3 Aerospace companies in the world. And I did all that without being a buddy fucker Marine and I made friends that I will have for the rest of my life due to the Corps. Its like they said buddy “No one promised you a rose garden”. You’ve also heard the following I’m sure…”The Marine Corps is what you make of it”. You dont like where you’re at? You wanna be high speed? If you’re a grunt, try out for recon, try out for security forces. If youre a pogue try out for MSG duty. And if you’re weak and cant make it, work out more, if you have a bad record and they wont take you, whose fault is that??

Dont get me wrong, there are a ton of pricks that with a shred of Administrative power, will try to fuck you over, Ive requested mast before and that didnt do shit. I get it, but if you think its better in the Army or Air Force then you’re welcome to go and put on their gay ass colors.

Semper Fi

USMC Sgt.
2000-2005

Submitted by: gomelo2

Is the Marine Corps this incompetent?

Is the Marine Corps this incompetent? So, I am getting a medical separation which I couldn’t be happier about. Camp Pendleton has been nothing but pure hell. I cannot stand 95% of the people I work with. Don’t even get me started on the worthless garbage “superiors”.Within the past day, two ridiculous things have happened. Payday was supposed to be today, or technically yesterday for those of us with Pacific Marine Credit Union.Who of course, has the worst luck and didn’t get paid? Me. I go to speak to the finance people and they tell me, “Whoops, someone put the wrong code on your file so your paycheck will be late.”… “How late?”, I asked. They respond with a “Up to a week.” You see, my problem with this is that I have a family and like a majority of Marines, we live paycheck to paycheck. Rent was due today so I had to borrow money. How is this acceptable at all? Now I’m scraping the empty barrel. Next thing, I get my medical record.What do they do? They screwed it up. Apparently I have been in the Marine Corps since 2001, I was a teenager in 2010, none of which is true. Now I have to fix it before they release me.

Submitted by: What the hell

Forever E3

I was born in Italy and enlisted in the Corps in
1966 and stated I was a citizen. While on active duty at Cherry Point, NC as an E3, I received a draft notice from Italy telling me to report to the Italian Army. I brought the letter to the JAG and expressed my wish to remain in the Corps. I was asked to produce my citizenship papers. Which I did not have. I was under the age of 15 when both parents became citizens so I automatically was awarded citizenship. Well neither I nor my parents had them. I was put under watch by 2 Marines until I was sent home to clear things up the FBI did a background check and I received a secret clearance.
I returned to base and was not given the opportunity to test for E4, I was told by Gunny in S3 that I would never get promoted. While serving in Chu Lai I had 29 months in grade as an E3 and I was pissed off so I snuck of base with no weapon except for my K BAR. I was going to exact my rage
on the gooks in the ville. I was caught by the Army MPS and brought back to base and was busted to E2. That was 2 months shy of 3 years and did not receive my Good Conduct Medal.
After leaving RVN for Conus, I was immediately put on mess duty for thirty days and when that was completed, I was assigned to more shit duty. I was busted again with 77 days
left till discharge and am still bitter about not receiving my Good Conduct Medal and never being promoted past E3. I was discharged after serving 4 years and had 4.3 and 4.4 pro con scores.
Thanks for reading this I’m somewhat relieved by getting this of my chest after all these years. I’m
still a Marine and Semper Fi brothers.

Forever E3

I’m curious to see what you all would do to fix this organization (other than disband it)?

As an NCO, my job is to enhance the effectiveness of the Marine Corps. However, I don’t see that happening when the following aren’t fixed:
1. Boot Camp (DIs and SDIs) needs to be able to weed people out more. I’m not talking about letting DIs abuse recruits. There are recruits who get through boot camp who has no business being a Marine. Some even want to drop out. Instead of discharging them and USMC decides to ‘punish’ them by recycling them, over and over, and over again even though it’s clear that they don’t want to be there. Guess what? You have to waste money and manpower going to a recruit or Marine that doesn’t want to be there and is gonna be liabilities later on. What are they? Well you see them mentioned here: buddy fuckers, they become bad leaders, incompetent Marines, mass punishments, etc. It doesn’t take much to see this compounds. Forcing them to go through by recycling isn’t doing anything. If you can’t handle 3 months of boot, what makes you think you can hack SOI, the operating forces or deployment? This is coming from my experiences and my conversation with a former Marine DI and recruiter. What kind of elite unit keeps undesirables who don’t even want to be in around? I do give some credit to some recruiters and Marines on RA who help poolees prepare for boot which contributed somewhat to lowering failure rates in boot camp.
2. Let Marines (active duty) choose their MOS- not just the field. I don’t get how the Marines generally wait until after boot camp to tell new Marines what their ‘exact’ MOS is and the reason for it is ‘the demands of the Marine Corps.’ This is an example of piss poor personnel management. While working Recruiters Assistance, I have seen several people turned away because they are not guaranteed to choose the exact MOS who had the potential to benefit the Marines.
3. Less advertisement. I swear I’m in an organization with attention whores. And you don’t even have to see the commercials (ie Katy Perry music video). If we are elite and cut down on the stupid BS by 25%, people will flock to join.

I’m curious to see what you all would do to fix this organization (other than disband it)?

Submitted by: dee dee dee

CivilianFirstClass USMC Advice – Prepare yourself for EAS NOW! Not later

Good morning, boys and girls! How the hell are we? You may be asking yourselves, “Who’s this douchebag and why does he sound so happy?” Well, I’ll tell you why. I recently separated from the Marine Corps with no ties with the organization (no IRR time left). This is going to be a bit long-winded so bear with me.

It was a bittersweet transition from being a man-baby who was coddled to a real adult. Before you motards start jumping on my back, I’ll ask you to think about it before you post. Marines aren’t allowed to take initiative or think for themselves. Ever hear “Good initiative, bad judgment” or “Who the hell told you to do that, Devil?!” Yeah, we’ve all been there. And that’s my point. Marines aren’t treated like adults, unless they’re SNCOs or officers. While in the Marine Corps everything is provided for you. You really didn’t have to worry about anything and money will be rolling in. Once you’re out you’ll have nothing but the things you work for. This is what I mean by bittersweet.

Well, I’ve been on this site a back and haven’t returned until now. Looks like there are a lot more
people since I last lurked through here. Which I think is great. Aside from the smoke pit, this is a wonderful medium for Marines to come and vent their anger and frustration. To the moderators/creators I say, keep up the great work. And to the Marines – come on here when you need to vent. Get it out of your system here and don’t lash out to those jerks around you (even though they may deserve it); don’t give them a reason to pick on you. Last time I was here, I replied to some troll that commented on the page. Looking through the anon boards, I don’t see too many trolls anymore. Although they are annoying, I do like it when they post. It’s fun to see Marines who’ve been mistreated or kept their anger bottled inside pounce on the troll. Because let’s face it, we couldn’t do that in real-life.

The main reason why I’m writing today is to try and impart some advice to Marines. The posts on
this board are loaded with sound advice so heed them. My advice is to milk the Marine Corps for all it’s worth. They’re going to get what they want from you so why not take what you can get? There are loads of things that can accomplish this without breaking the law. Tuition assistance is a MAJOR one. If you’re in right now, you’d be an idiot and not to take advantage of it. It’s free money. I can’t stress that enough. I started taking classes for three reasons: 1. Education 2. Milking the Marine Corps 3. Getting out of field day. I don’t mind cleaning my room because I’m a neat person by nature. But what I didn’t like was to clean after other Marines. Why should I clean the lounge if I don’t ever go in the lounge? Or clean the NCO deck if I’m not an NCO? So instead of getting black-out drunk, why not just take a class or two? It’ll make you’re time go by much faster and make you more marketable when you’re ready to transition.
Next thing you should do is go to medical to claim every ache and pain. I’m sure some of you have heard this before so just do it. If you have enough claims you may get money after you leave the service. This is simple and doesn’t take much time. And even if it does, it’ll get you out of work for a bit.

Lastly, my advice is to save money. This is very important especially if you are planning to get out. It’s never too early to start. A few hundred dollars a month will add up and will give you a good start when you’re out in the real world looking for a job. Or while you’re in school if you plan to go that route. With a good amount of savings to supplement your Post 9/11 GI Bill, you’ll be in a good position to start your new life semi-worry free. While you’re out, it’s amazing how much you have to pay for when you’re on your own and I just hope you’re properly prepared for it. It’s not easy but it sure is satisfying to know that you are on your own.

In no way am I saying you have listen to me because I’m a nobody, just a former cog in a huge machine which is the Marine Corps. But I genuinely do want Marines who gets out to succeed. On my way back to my home of record, I ran into a former Marine and started shooting the shit. He was bitter with his current situation and I asked what he did to prepare before he got out. I found out, he didn’t do much. He was so used to the security that the military provided that he didn’t properly prepare. I don’t want to be in the same situation and I don’t want to see you guys there either. So please prepare yourselves because it’ll make a world of difference once you’re out.

Nothing feels better than leaving with your DD214, Navy Comm (worthless in the real world), and a check for the leave days I sold back while driving off base for the last time. The feeling is invigorating and liberating. It’s the next chapter of your life so make sure that it’s going to be a
good one by doing what you need to do now. Don’t wait for later to get your shit together. Do it now.

A little about myself: I am a former NCO and was just an average Marine. I got out a few months
ago and now living a normal life. I didn’t do anything special while in the Marine Corps but I didn’t manage to get an associate’s degree (I wish I would’ve started right away so I would’ve gotten a bachelors). I am working for the government (not DoD) and planning to finish my schooling.

Again, I wish all of you the best of luck. I know your EAS seems like forever away but make the time in between count and do something meaningful that’ll prepare you for the real world. It’s going to be worth it in the end.

Submitted by: CivilianFirstClass

If I enlist (Infantry MOS) what will I really be getting?

Hey there, I’ve been thinking about joining for a long time now (I’m about to be a senior in High School) and I’m wondering why I shouldn’t. I read the novel Jarhead, and like Swofford, I think I’m afraid that in civilian life I’ll faulter, and I see the Marines as a way to gain access into maturity and manhood. My family’s become distant, and I feel like I’m not really close to friends I’ve had, so the brotherhood aspect is also appealing. I have always had a strong sense of national pride and I think joining would fill me with pride, but I’ve read a few horror stories on here, so if I enlist (Infantry MOS) what will I really be getting? Are the aspects of the Corps that appeal to me merely hype? Also, I’m sorry if this is redundant. I have read many posts, but I wanted to see if I could get some direct responses, thanks.

Submitted by: Johnny2X4

NINJA_PUNCH’s Response:
Hey, no need to apologize, that’s what this site exists for. I can understand the concept of wanting maturity and manhood out of the military, after all that’s how they advertise it. However, what you’re more likely to find are people who joined because they “want to go kill people”. A good friend of mine once said “the military is a great place for people who never want to grow up: You always have someone who outranks you to hold your hand and make sure you get everything done.” That really is how it is. Every NCO, or Staff NCO will tell you “you’re a grown man I’m not going to babysit you.” But it won’t take long before you’ll find yourself wishing that this was actually true. In reality, even something as simple as cleaning your room, or exercising will be micromanaged to death. You have to stretch out in a group, go do exercises in a group, go running in a single-file line, because all of these “grown men” can’t be trusted to exercise and stay in shape on their own. You need to have a day set aside where the people who outrank you will breath down your neck as you clean every last speck of dust from your room, because “grown men” can’t be trusted to not live in squalor.

Furthermore, most people in the military will turn a blind eye to underage drinking, so they keep having “High School parities” then they turn 21 and they don’t have to worry about getting caught so they want to show off how they can drink and not have to hide it, and it just never stops. Pretty soon you have a 30 year old alcoholic who wears his alcoholism like a badge of honor, and everyone younger than him thinks he’s just so cool because he’s drinks so much!

As far as the Infantry goes, I was attached to an infantry battalion for my deployment, and it’s as if these guys never leave boot camp. Their Sgts yelled and screamed over nothing every bit as much as Drill Instructors did, and the “Senior LCpls” were constantly on the search for new and inventive ways of circumventing hazing laws.

In conclusion, yes, the aspects of the marine corps that you find appealing are almost entirely recruiting propaganda. If you really feel the need to join the military out of fear of failing in the civilian world, I would recommend joining the any branch of the reserves or the National Guard, just so you have some kind of job security while you get yourself on your feet in Civilian life.

Safety and Peace

NINJA_PUNCH

Disgruntled Former 0311

I went to boot camp during the summer of 2008. After that it was off to ITB. I was soooo excited to go the fleet after that. I wanted to do amazing things with my life. What I got instead was horrible. My “senior marines” didn’t haze me. They physically and mentally abused me. Everyone says “I would stand up and fight them.” But when it’s a uniformed gang, there’s no fighting against them. I spun into depression. Everyday was a struggle to not go U.A. I hated everyone. But most of all, I hated myself. I felt worthless. THEN it came time to deploy. About a week before we left for Afghan, the company 1st Sgt asked each squad leader for one marine to send to H&S company for FOB Guard Duty. While the rest of the company was in the “REAL” combat zone I was stuck standing 12 hrs of post a day, going on a bullshit patrol (so close to the wire I could spit on it) and doing massive amounts of S-4 working parties. I worked 18 hr days as an 0311 in a POG’s world. I wanted to fight. I wanted to have the satisfaction of trading rounds with my enemies. But I guess I didnt rate. All this time building up the anticipation. And the marine corps stole it from me. By the time I was able to go with my original company, the shooting had stopped. I was berated so badly by my peers for my so called “cowardice” that there were several times i had to pull my M16 barrel out of my mouth. I told my team leader I was suicidal. He said I was a bitch. my entire squad “no balls’ed” me to kill myself. I plotted their murders and my suicide shortly following their demise. I lost my Faith in Jesus Christ. i lost my faith in my “fellow” marines and their so called “brotherhood.” I lost faith in myself. I never ended up killing anyone including anyone in my squad. my second deployment was an uneventful MEU. I have since EAS’ed. I hate the Marine Corps. I wasnt the best marine, but I always did what I was told and followed the rules. Fuck The Marine Corps.

Submitted by: Disgruntled Former 0311

This site is a joke!

What a joke. The site, the members, the
moderators, and all contributors. This is nothing more than another internet
black hole for the pathetic youth of our nation to spew their one sided lie.
I’m sick of reading and hearing self centered snowflakes whine and complain
about how everything in life wasn’t handed to them. ~>Anonymous<~ of
course it is. Because liars, cheats, lazy, dirty, and pathetic incompetents
NEED ~>Anonymous<~ zero accountability for actions is what feeds this
generation of losers. So munch on my
drainers of the economy, and keep your arms extended for all the freebies you
feel no need to earn. Go ahead and plaster your stories and so called experiences
all over the web, because we all know that they’re the only ones you will
really remember.

The United States Marine Corps has forever
impacted your life, both during and after. You will remember.

Submitted by: Anyonomous <– Haha

 

THE RESPONSE!

Yeah, some youth, and some guys who’ve been in for 18+ years. But yeah mostly youth, I guess that’s what happens when you let people join at 17 with parental consent (woah, that makes sense! Amazing right!)

One-sided lie… Alright, for the most part I’ll give you one sided, I try to be fair but I suppose sometimes even I fail. But which part of what’s been said here is the lie? I’d be rather surprised if you could pick out one lie on this site (other than someone saying how great the marine corps is).

“Liars, cheats, lazy, dirty, and pathetic incompetents NEED ~>Anonymous<~ zero accountability for actions is what feeds this generation of losers.” My, that’s an ironic condemnation… watch this: “Liars, cheats, lazy, dirty, and pathetic incompetents NEED Rockers, zero accountability for actions is what feeds this generation of losers.” You see that? Just like that I turned it into an accurate depiction of SNCO’s.

But you’re right, I will remember. Some things you don’t forgive, some things you don’t forget, and in the short time that I’ve been out I’ve already successfully stopped 2 people from joining and I’m working on preventing more.

Safety and Peace

P.S.
Ooohhhh OPSEC. Scary. I’ll tell you what, do whatever you like, oh and if you could get this site into the marine corps times, or even just an annual training brief, that be great!

– NINJA_PUNCH

 

RESPONSE 2

I too, challenge this individual to find a single lie on this website. And also, just the mere existence of this website has deterred many young men from wasting 4 precious years of doing absolutely nothing. People like you have been making threats against this site for years, and it is still up, and continues to grow. Over 200,000 people have visited this site, and that growth shows no signs of slowing down. In fact, iHateTheUSMC has been breaking traffic records monthly.

Good luck with whatever it is you try to do to harm this site.

– Stanimus

My husband is trying to join the Marines.

My husband is trying to join the marines. First he wanted to join when I was pregnant and I was really supportive but now I’m just scared and don’t want to lose him. We just had our son, and I thought he would change his mind but he hasn’t.. he says all he wants to do in life is be a marine and blow peoples heads off, Everyone keeps saying that it is a decision that we both need to agree on but I know if I don’t let him he will hate me, but I really don’t think I’m strong enough to be the marine wife I thought I could be… I just want us to be together as a family and he doesn’t seem to understand my feelings. When he leaves I will have to sign a note saying that me and my two kids will be financially taken care of for 3 months while he’s in boot camp, and honestly, we wont be, I cannot find a babysitter so I can work and my parents cannot afford to support us.. I just don’t understand. And I’m not trying to sound like a pussy when it comes to me not being able to handle it, it’s just I really DONT think I can handle it as I am prone to severe depression/ postpartum depression.

Submitted by: scared_wife

 

“Recruiters Don’t Lie” – SSGT3529

“You all need to get a life and stop blaming the Corps for your problems. Your recruiter didn’t lie to you and it’s not your 1stSgt or SgtMaj’s fault. Man the fuck up and look yourselves in the mirror. IT’S YOU THAT IS FUCKED UP! Whether you’re on BCP or have been NJP’d or just can’t hack it, that’s your problem not the Corps’s. All of the tools are there for you. You just have to use them and stop expecting everyone to hold your hand. But it’s ok, because mommy and daddy will take your side of the story and they’ll start blaming the Corps too. They’ll start telling their friends how the Corps messed you up and they’ll let you live in their house where you can eat hot pockets and tell everyone on the Internet that you were a stellar Marine. GO FUCK YOURSELF!” – SSGT3529

RESPONSE

“Your recruiter didn’t lie to you” Thank you, I needed that laugh. I’ll admit I had a pretty straight-forward recruiter, but even he lied and sugar-coated things. I remember some of the other recruiters at the station and they were so bad that some times on the ride home my recruiter would tell me things that the other recruiters were just out-right lying about, just because he felt bad for the other kids! So don’t try to tell yourself that recruiters wouldn’t lie to get someone to join because that’s just plain ignorance.

Now, to be fair, I do know a few people who were straight up worthless human beings, compulsive liars, took no responsibility for their actions, I even know one guy who was blaming the cop for his DUI, so I know those people exist. However, some of those people are SNCOs, like the 1st Sgt who decided that “setting the example” meant walking around outside the wire, with no gear, no guards, not even a rifle, just him and his pistol, outside the wire in Afghanistan, and then yelling at one of the guys on guard as he came back inside the wire, because one of them wasn’t wearing gloves.

Next, the whole reason I got out was the hand holding! I expected that after boot camp (Or at least SOI) that they would let you stand on your own two feet. Boy was I wrong, I’ve seen Gunnys and SSgts, holding the Sgts and Cpls hands because the SNCOs don’t trust the NCOs to be NCOs. Meanwhile the NCOs are holding the junior marines hands every step of the way because they don’t dare let the junior marines take responsibility for anything except their failures. Any success is the result of good leadership, any failure is the result of individual incompetence. That way it’s never the SNCOs fault, even if he’s the one who gave the order, and the order was followed to the letter.

Maybe if the so-called “leadership” would actually let junior marines take responsibility for their successes as well as their failures, and would let them stand on their own every once in a while there’d be fewer mishaps. Maybe if you TREATED them like men, they would ACT like men! Amazing huh?

Lastly, no I don’t tell everyone I was a stellar marine. I openly deny that I ever was a marine. When I meet someone I tell them I was in an engineering company that was contracted to do work on a marine base in Afghanistan. That way I can tell them what bottom of the barrel types the marine corps actually is, and how foolish it is for the military to even be over there, without having to admit to ever being a part of such a fucked up institution.

Safety and Peace

– NINJA_PUNCH

What has the marine corps done for you?

so far the only thing I can say is they’ve fucked me like it’s going out of style. I joined 11 months ago, I went through boot camp, in itb I injured my knee the second week, what did they tell me? the corpsman called me a pussy and told me to suck it up, the combat instructors blasted me non stop for it. I finished and got to the fleet, and the co gunny saw me limping and made me go to medical. The corpsman could see my knee was fucked up and told the mo, he looked at it and said it was nothing but inflammation. After going back everyday for about a week or two, I convinced them to take an xray which showed that my tibia was fractured, when I told them it wasn’t just my shin, it was mostly my knee, they told me it was just inflammation. it took about 3 months to finally convince them to look at my knee, they saw that my knee wasn’t just inflamed but that it was seriously fucked up. I finally got a bone scan and an MRI, they told me it was just a small tear in my ACL that physical therapy would heal, about 3 months of that with no improvement, they put me on limdu. While they were looking up my medical files on the computer, I snuck a peek and noticed that it said my ACL was torn, my meniscus was torn, my proximal patellar tendon was torn and I had PFPS (twisted knee cap). the surgeon told me my knee is so fucked that he’s afraid he’ll fuck it up more if he cuts me open. he also told me I’m never going to run again, I’ll be lucky if I can stop having to use a cane and if I stop limping. anywho, they are doing absolutely nothing for my knee, and they stopped physical therapy, if that wasn’t bad enough, my chain of command is disregarding my limdu chit that says no prolonged standing (more than 5 minutes), no pft/cft, pt at own pace, and making me stand during (3) hour and a half long formations, running a partial pft, and making me pt for an hour everyday. If I say anything about this, what happens? I get in trouble on paper, and the nco’s snco’s make my life a living hell.

If that’s not bad enough, I’m JUST getting started.

Theeeen, there’s mental health. Starting in boot camp, getting a little worse in itb, and then plummeting in the unit is my depression. It’s gotten bad enough that I’m on anti depressants, have a snco that I have to check with everyday, and I have to go to mental health appointments every week to keep from killing others or myself.

There’s also the anxiety and stress set on by my unit, it’s gotten so bad that I have panic attacks almost every day or every other day, it’s so bad that when my phone rings, I start freaking out thinking it is my coc calling to SOMEHOW fuck me over. Even if it’s on my home phone which the unit doesn’t know the number to. I don’t answer my cell or home phone when I’m off work anymore, my wife does.

and then there’s the shear stupidity of the unit. I’m in rbe since the unit is deployed, our bright ass 1stsgt is being investigated for hazing, disrespect, and a handful of other ucmj orders that have been broken. He went to peoples houses on AND off base to do field day inspections. His idea of running the bn? making all of us broken guys go to the field and running training ops to “retain our infantry skills” (Thanks you boot ass supply/di piece of shit that has never actually been in combat)(made 1stsgt in 14 years, target time is 17.5-20 years).

Because of my mental health status, the psychiatrist has deemed me unfit to stand barracks duty, he even gave me a chit to give to the command saying such and he told me that if they do not want to oblige it, they can call and talk to him. I handed the chit up the coc, they decided that it was only a recommendation and decided I needed to get fucked and made an example of. I am still standing duty, my plt sgt is just ITCHING to njp me. for example, after duty, my unit does a 24 recovery period where you are off work, I went to the formation and I was supposed to be off so I went home. When the next formation rolled around, they called asking where I was, when I told them, they recalled me and gave me a negative counseling for being ua to a formation, I’m still awaiting the 6105/njp. Then my wife last night decided to give me a hickey, today when I went to work, I got a negative counseling and got told that if they see another one ever again, they are going to njp me and apparently I have a lot of 6105’s in my record which would mean I would get processed out. I was under the impression that if you got a 6105, you would be informed or would have to sign something acknowledging that you understand why (me having ANY 6105’s is news to me).

So to all then poolees/wannabe’s that think this corporation is for you, all it did for me was break me down physically, break me down mentally, and now they are trying to make it so they can kick me out punitively so I don’t get benefits.

FUCK THIS SHIT HOLE, IT IS NOT WORTH ALL THE BULLSHIT THEY TELL YOU, IF YOU ARE THINKING OF JOINING, DON’T FUCKING DO IT!

Submitted by: fucked like its cool